Monthly Archives: February 2018

Car Trunk Abortionist Gets Slap on the Wrist for Three Felonies

Lansing, Mich. — On Thursday, December 7, Michigan abortionist Michael Roth received a $798 fine and 18 months of probation for three felony convictions in Macomb County Circuit Court. The convictions stem from his suspected practice of illegal at-home abortions.

Roth pled no contest on October 16 to three counts of larceny in a building. Roth had a person steal drugs and medical equipment from his former employer Angel Ojeda, an abortionist who runs the Eastland Women’s Center in Eastpointe, Michigan.

Right to Life of Michigan President Barbara Listing said, “It’s outrageous that a man with a long record of violations can get off with so little for three felony convictions.”

In September 2015 Roth was involved in an accident when his car struck a 31-year-old man with special needs. Police found several stolen items along with tissue from aborted babies in the trunk of his car. Given Roth’s previous history of performing abortions in women’s homes in 1998 and 1999, it’s likely he was committing illegal at-home abortions.

Roth was facing other criminal charges, including identity theft and possession with intent to deliver the schedule 2 narcotic Fentanyl, but those charges were dismissed in June. The Michigan Board of Medicine suspended Roth’s license on September 13 for a year and fined him $25,000 for unlawful possession of a controlled substance.

Listing said, “We hope Roth’s license to practice medicine will be permanently revoked. He should never practice medicine again, anywhere.”

Lynn Mills is a citizen journalist who attended Roth’s sentencing hearings. Mills has followed the case from the beginning, and said she was frustrated that no media outlets have sent reporters to the hearings to cover this story since Roth’s initial arrest.

Mills said, “In court this man looked oblivious. There were no real consequences, and he will not stop doing it. Where have the reporters been? I guess this story hasn’t been sensational enough.”

Listing said, “Just like the Kermit Gosnell case in Philadelphia, abortionists with long records don’t receive needed public scrutiny. It allows these abortionists to continue to get away with things others couldn’t. Roth is not an outlier, but the face of the abortion industry in Michigan and nationally.”

Right to Life of Michigan released a report in 2012, Abortion Abuses and State Regulatory Agency Failure, including details on several of Roth’s violations. In addition to his at-home abortions, Roth was disciplined in 2002 for drug-related violations, including prescribing drugs without a license. He was disciplined in 2004 for violating patient consent laws and was accused of falsifying medical records by a former employee and performing illegal late-term abortions.

In 2012 Roth received six months of probation and was ordered to pay a $15,000 fine for Public Health Code violations involving botched abortions. Roth’s most recent abortion business, the bizarrely-named Novi Laser and Aesthetic Center, was closed in 2014.

Background information:
Abortion Abuses and State Regulatory Agency Failure report
Criminal charges and case background
Other charges dismissed

Ask Dr. Universe – Cold in the Mountains

Dear Dr. Universe: Why is it so cold up in the mountains if heat rises and it’s closer to the sun? –Andrea, 11 

Dear Andrea,

You’re right. If we took a trip into the mountains, we would find that it felt a lot colder. It all has to do with our atmosphere. We may not always think about it, but we are basically living in a giant ocean of air.

“It’s a big part of what makes Earth livable,” said my friend Shelley Pressley. She’s an environmental engineer at Washington State University’s Laboratory for Atmospheric Research. “Without gravity and our atmosphere, all the oxygen we breathe would fly out into space.”

Our atmosphere contains small building blocks, or gas molecules, that make up the air we breathe, she said. We can’t always see or feel how much gas there is, but we can measure it. We can calculate the mass of gas, or the number of molecules there are in a certain area.

Air is actually pushing down on us all the time, even if we can’t really feel it.

“Imagine you are standing on Earth’s surface,” Pressley said. “There’s a column of air above your head that stretches up to the top of the atmosphere. The column of air is pushing down on your head. This is pressure.”

“Now, climb the tallest mountain you can find and stand on it,” she adds. “The column of air pushing down on your head is shorter. It has less mass than the column in the first spot.”

The air pressure is greater when you are closer to the level of the ocean’s surface. Here, the building blocks or molecules are pretty squished together. When the gas’ pressure is greater, temperature increases.

Maybe you’ve heard people say the air is thinner up in the mountains, where there is less pressure and the molecules or building blocks are more spread out. When the pressure of a gas decreases, so does temperature.

Pressure is a big part of the answer to the first part of your question. The other part of your question involves the sun. Our sun is about 490 billion feet away from the surface of the Earth.

While a mountain might seem tall, it’s pretty puny in comparison to the distance between Earth and our sun. It actually doesn’t make a huge difference in temperature.

Pressley said that pressure and our sun also have a lot to do with weather. When sunlight travels through the atmosphere, it heats the surface of the planet. When the surface gets warmer, it sends heat back up to air molecules near the surface and warms them up. The molecules of air rise. As they do, they expand and cool.

Somewhere else, air over a mountain that is even colder actually starts to sink. This sinking air gets compressed, squished together, and heats up. This mixing of air is called convection and is at the heart of our weather. This system also keeps the surface of our home planet warm enough to live—from the colder mountains to the warmer beaches around our world.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Fruitport Township Planning Commission Meeting Agenda – 02/20/18

AGENDA

PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP
5865 AIRLINE RD
FRUITPORT, MI  49415

February 20, 2018
6:30 PM WORK SESSION
7:00 PM BOARD MEETING

WORK SESSION
Continue review of ordinances

BOARD MEETING
01. Roll Call
02. Approval of Planning Commission Minutes:  January 16, 2018
03. Approve / Amend Agenda
04. Correspondence / Reports
05.  Public Comments pertaining to agenda topics

New Business
06. Site Plan Review – Teddy Spaghettis – 3032 Hts. Ravenna Rd.
Parcel: 61-15-530-000-0009-00
Purpose: Addition to existing restaurant

07. Site Plan Review & Special Use – 2963 Hts. Ravenna Rd.
Parcel: 61-15-293-000-0001-00
Purpose: Smokehouse/General Store and Seasonal Outdoor Market

08. Informational – Sternberg/Quarterline Hotel Development

Old Business
None

09. Public Comments
10. Adjournment

The township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the Township Clerk:  Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Charter Township, 5865 Airline Rd, Fruitport, MI 49415   (231) 865-3151.

Fruitport School Board Special Meeting – Agenda – 02/16/18

Fruitport Community Schools
SPECIAL SCHOOL BOARD MEETING
Friday, February 16, 2018 – 11:30 a.m.
Board of Education Meeting Room

AGENDA

I. CALL to ORDER

II. ROLL CALL

III. APPROVAL OF AGENDA

IV. GENERAL BOARD BUSINESS
1. Approval of Board Meeting Minutes of January 22, 2018 (attachment IV-1)
2. High School Bond Work Bid Update

V. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC*

VI. OTHER

VII. ADJOURNMENT

 

*Time is provided for members of the audience to address the Board of Education regarding any topic including items on the agenda. The board is providing one opportunity for the public to comment during the meeting. Members of the audience may wish to bring issues to the Board of Education for board consideration. Time limits may be placed if a large number of individuals would like to address the board.

Fruitport Board of Education Meeting Agenda – 02/19/18

Fruitport Community Schools
BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING
Board of Education Meeting Room
Monday, February 19, 2018 – 7:00 p.m.

I. CALL to ORDER

II. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

III. ROLL CALL

IV. APPROVAL OF AGENDA

V. PRESENTATIONS
1. Kickstart to Career – Chris McGuigan and Janelle Mair
2. Science Projects – Kathy Six

VI. COMMUNICATIONS

VII. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC*

VIII. SUPERINTENDENT/ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS

IX. CONSENT AGENDA
1. Approval of Special Meeting Minutes of February 16, 2018 (attachment IX-1)
2. Approval of Bills (attachment IX-2)
General Fund                         $255,713.60
Other Funds:
•  Early Childhood Center              937.95
•  Food Service                             5,953.00
•  Coop Ed (ISD) Tech Millage    3,118.92
•  Capital Projects (Bond)       190,432.42
Total Bill List                        $456,155.89

3. Acceptance of Monthly Financial Report and ACH Transactions (attachment IX-3)
4. Acceptance of Student Activity Summary Report (attachment IX-4)
5. Acceptance of Credit Card and Utilities Report (attachment IX-5)
6. Approval of Personnel Report (includes confirmation of new hires, resignations, retirees, and transfers) (attachment IX-6)

X. GENERAL BOARD BUSINESS
1. Approval of High School Bond Project Bids (attachment X-1)
2. Approval of the 2018-19 School of Choice Resolution (attachment X-2)

XI. BUSINESS & FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Elroy Buckner, Chairperson
1. Report of Committee Meeting held February 12, 2018 (attachment XI-1)

XII. PERSONNEL COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Steve Kelly, Chairperson
1. Report of Committee Meeting held February 13, 2018 (attachment XII-1)
2. Approval of the Superintendent’s Evaluation (attachment XII-2)

XIII. STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Jill
Brott, Chairperson
1. Report of Committee Meeting held February 14, 2018 (attachment XIII-1)
2. Approval of New High School Art Courses (attachment XIII-2)
3. Approval of Overnight Trip Requests (attachment XIII-3)

XIV. BOARD MEMBER REPORTS AND DISCUSSIONS

XV. AGENDA ITEMS FOR FUTURE MEETINGS & SCHEDULING OF SPECIAL MEETINGS
1. Schedule Business & Finance Committee Meeting
2. Schedule Personnel Committee Meeting
3. Schedule Student Affairs Committee Meeting
4. Re-schedule March Board Meeting from March 19 to March 26, 2018. Roll Call Vote…
5. MCSBA Spring Dinner, May 3, 2018 5:30 – 8:00 pm, The Lake House
6. Schedule Board Workshops (April, June, September and October)

XVI. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC*

XVII. ADJOURNMENT

 

*Time is provided for members of the audience to address the Board of Education regarding any topic including items on the agenda. The board is providing two opportunities for the public to comment during the meeting. The first is for people who wish to bring issues to the Board of Education for board consideration.
At the end of the meeting the board will provide a brief opportunity for community members to comment on activities and/or discussion that took place during the board meeting. Time limits may be placed if a large number of individuals would like to address the board.

City of Muskegon Agrees to Produce Taste of Muskegon

MUSKEGON, MI – After building up the highly successful and popular Taste of Muskegon event over the past 11 years, Downtown Muskegon Now and the city of Muskegon have agreed to transfer the local downtown festival to the city.

Muskegon City Manager Frank Peterson and DMN Chairman Andy Maciejewski have signed a “letter of understanding” in passing the Taste of Muskegon event to the city with the goal of sustaining and growing the event celebrating Muskegon food, community and local businesses.

“The Taste of Muskegon over the past few years has outgrown our small agency’s ability to produce and take the risk for such a large annual event in Hackley Park,” Maciejewski said. “The DMN board is grateful for the hard work and dedication of the volunteer team that took a struggling event and created one of the largest gatherings in Hackley Park every year.”

Taste of Muskegon — the third weekend of June in 2017 — drew record crowds both Friday night as a Party in the Park and all day Saturday. The event was a huge boost for the nearly two dozen food vendors who had significant sales and were able to promote their products and restaurants.

After looking for a non-profit to take over the Taste of Muskegon, DMN entered discussions with city officials, who want to keep the event as a kickoff to the downtown Muskegon festival season.

“We want to continue to support and build up downtown events and activities,” Peterson said of the city’s interest in Taste of Muskegon. “We see this event raising funds to support community projects to better the quality of life for everyone in the city.”

Taste of Muskegon proceeds will support programs and events at the city’s Muskegon Farmers Market, Western Market, Hackley Park, Pere Marquette Park and the Smith-Ryerson Playfield among other city facilities, city officials said.

“We hope that longtime Taste of Muskegon sponsors, organizers and volunteers will help us keep building and improving the event that draws a wide variety of people from across the community,” Peterson said of an event slated for the weekend of June 15-16, 2018.

The city of Muskegon has incorporated many of the Taste of Muskegon vendors into its popular Food Truck Rallies this summer at the Muskegon Farmers Market. Next year’s Taste of Muskegon is expected to launch an expanded schedule of Food Truck Rallies at the market for 2018.

Key to the recent success of Taste of Muskegon has been incorporating it into that Friday night’s Party in the Park. Parties in the Park President Ami Gongalski said that the Friday night Taste of Muskegon was its largest and most successful party in 2017.

“Parties in the Park has been thrilled to incorporate Taste of Muskegon into our schedule the past few years,” Gongalski said. “We look forward to reaching out to the city to see how this collaboration can continue in 2018 and future years.”

Ottawa Administrator Delivers the ‘State of the County’ Address

alvanderbergOttawa County is where people want to be. Low property taxes, a flourishing economy, and a region rich in natural beauty are just a few qualities attracting residents to the area. Ottawa County Administrator Al Vanderberg shared this and other Ottawa County highlights from 2017 during January 23rd’s State of the County Address. Other themes in the report include Ottawa County government’s strong financial position; the collaborations and partnerships that enhance services and save tax dollars; exciting park and paved trail developments, and innovative improvement processes.

Vanderberg also listed some of the challenges and projects on the horizon for 2018 including opioid abuse, the increasing need for mental health services and corresponding funding, affordable housing, pension liability, cyber-security, and planning for a new Juvenile Justice Center.

The full speech can be read here.

Workforce Shortage is the Top Concern

from Jodi Kittle, Communications Manager for the Muskegon Lakeshore Chamber of Commerce

If you are looking for work, look no further than Muskegon County! Finding and recruiting workers is the number one concern of area businesses according to Muskegon Lakeshore Chamber of Commerce members. Each year, the chamber surveys local businesses to find out how to make Muskegon County the best place to live, work, and play. At the end of 2017, 68% percent of the businesses surveyed stated that the workforce shortage was the number one concern.

“It is great to have a strong economy, yet now we must work to develop local talent and recruit new talent to the community,” says Cindy Larsen, President of the Muskegon Lakeshore Chamber of Commerce. “This means supporting effective workforce training programs like skilled training funds,” says Larsen. Last year, over $700,000 in state training funds was distributed to local businesses according to records from Muskegon Area First, Muskegon County’s economic development agency.

Also important to the business community is infrastructure improvement for roads, waterfront development and the port development. At the same time, more public transportation opportunities including walkable/bikeable pathways rated high on the chamber survey list.

Over 150 businesses responded to the annual survey which is used to determine the chamber advocacy agenda for the following year. The Muskegon Lakeshore Chamber of Commerce will now promote these issues to local and state elected officials for their consideration when determining community needs. Activities that support business and education partnerships will be a high priority in 2018 as well.

The Muskegon Lakeshore Chamber of Commerce is celebrating 125 years as the area’s premier business organization. Click here for further survey results.

Muskegon County Calendar of Events 02/12/18 – 02/19/18

Presented by the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau
www.visitmuskegon.org


The Vietnam War: A Film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick
Monday, February 12 @ 6:00 pm

Monday evenings at 6:00pm, January 29 – April 2, come to the USS Silversides Submarine Museum, located at 1346 Bluff St. for The Vietnam War by Ken Burns! Each episode will be followed by a discussion. Admission is free with the purchase of museum admission. Members are free. For more information, call 231-755-1230.


Planetarium Show: Faster than Light! The Dream of Interstellar Flight
Tuesdays and Thursdays 7:00 pm – 7:35 pm

January 16 – March 29 on Tuesdays and Thursdays, come to Carr-Fles Planetarium for “Faster than Light! The Dream of Interstellar Flight!” The impulse to strike out into the unknown, to see what’s over the horizon is as old as humanity. Today, a whole new horizon beckons. Scientists now believe that our galaxy is filled with solar systems, including up to 9 billion Sun-like stars with planets similar to Earth. Astronomers are racing to find habitable worlds, including any that might exist in the neighborhood of our Sun. But if we find one, how will we ever get there? How long will it take? What rocket designs might one day conquer the voids of space? Faster Than Light! The Dream of Interstellar Flight will dazzle audiences with virtual rides aboard spacecraft of the future. This is a 35-minute presentation. (The campus will be closed March 6 and March 8 for College Spring Break) For more information, call (231) 777-0289.


Muskegon Museum of Art: Postcard Salon
February 1 – February 15

Don’t miss the “Postcard Salon” exhibition happening February 1 – 15 at the Muskegon Museum of Art! Over 1,400 cards from artists from West Michigan and beyond were on display last year, offering a huge range of materials and subject matter to enjoy. Now in its 12th year, the Postcard Salon reflects the Muskegon Museum of Art’s commitment to Michigan artists, a chance for people of all ages and skill levels to share their work with the public.

The exhibition is free to enter and all submitted cards are installed, making the show a true community endeavor. The exhibition is also a great opportunity to support the area arts community by purchasing an original work of art. Join them this year for the first ever juror awards, singling out four remarkable cards.

Beginning at 7:00pm on Thursday, February 15, all of the postcards on display in the Wiener Gallery will be for sale at $30 apiece. Don’t miss this opportunity to own an original artwork by your favorite regional artists. Buyers will be able to take the works directly from the walls and pay for them at several locations throughout the museum. Muskegon Museum of Art members will be given a five-minute head start beginning promptly at 6:55pm. The sale ends at 8:00pm, so don’t miss out! Memberships can be obtained in the Museum Gift Store, or in the gallery on the 15th. For more information, call 231-720-2570.


Movies @ the Library: Hidden Figures
Tuesday, February 13 at 5:30pm

Come to Hackley Public Library for the film “Hidden Figures” (127 mins. PG) as they celebrate Black History Month! This film portrays the true story of how NASA found untapped talent in a group of African-American female mathematicians that served as the brains behind one of the greatest operations in U.S. history.“Movies @ the Library” happens first Tuesday of the month. Bring your own snacks and non-alcoholic beverages. Brought to the community through a generous bequest from Bess Commodore. WUVS 103.7 “The Community Station” the Beat is the media sponsor.


Muskegon Lumberjacks Hockey Home Game
Wednesday, February 14 @ 7:00 pm       

Spend Wednesday February 14 (Valentine’s Day) at Lumberjacks home game. The puck drops at 7:15pm as the Jacks take on the Bloomington Thunder at the L.C. Walker Arena. Purchase tickets by calling 231-724-5225. GO JACKS!


Dining in the Dark
Wednesday, February 14 6:00pm – 9:00pm,

Come to Kitchen 242 inside the Muskegon Farmers’ Market for “Dining in the Dark,” an event that will heighten four of your five senses. Enjoy a fun, out-of-your comfort-zone experience while dining in a whole new way. Enjoy a delicious meal by Chef Jack Page, designed to stimulate the palate and challenge your sense of smell and taste. Of course, all of this will happen while eating completely in the dark! Wearing older clothing is encouraged. There is limited seating and this event will sell out! A cash bar will be available with Happy Hour from 6:00pm – 7:00pm. Dinner begins at 7:00pm. Dietary restrictions can be accommodated with advance notice. Please indicate any restrictions by emailing ann.meisch@shorelinecity.com. Tickets are $50 and available through www.eventbrite.com. For more information, call (231) 722-3251.


Muskegon Museum of Art: Free Thursday Evening Tours
Thursdays @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Every Thursday from 4:00pm – 8:00pm, you’re invited to the Muskegon Museum of Art for a free tour guided by MMA docents, compliments of Meijer! Call 231-720-2570.


Learn to Luge Weekend
Friday – Sunday @ 6:00 pm

Every Friday – Sunday at 6:00pm (weather permitting), you can learn to luge at the Muskegon Winter Sports Complex, offering one of only four publicly accessible luge tracks in the United States! Although shorter in overall length than the Olympic tracks in New York and Salt Lake City, the Muskegon Luge track provides an Olympic thrill with the safety of the participant in mind. The track was designed by three-time Olympian Frank Masley and consists of six curves and two starting areas. For more information, call 1-877-TRY-LUGE or visit the website below to make reservations.

Safe & Easy to Learn:

Safety is the number one priority when teaching new sliders or conducting races with seasoned sliders. All participants must be at least 8 years old at the time of their session. Participants are outfitted with elbow pads, a helmet and a well-maintained luge sled. An instructor carefully goes over each part of the sled with a beginning slider and teaches easy to learn methods of steering the sled. Over three decades, the program has instructed thousands of sliders from age 8 to 80 to safely and successfully luge. While luge is referred to the fastest sport on ice, this track is designed for the novice slider at slower speeds than an Olympic track, where sliders can reach speeds of 90+ mph. The top speeds at the Muskegon Winter Sports Complex track are approximately 30 mph on a “good ice” day although to most new sliders it still feels like 90 mph!

Get Some Physical Activity in the Winter:

The sleds weigh between 25-40 lbs. and are transported up a flight of stairs to the top of the luge track by human power…you! Small children will most likely need adult help to get their sled back up the hill. If you have heart troubles or health issues that may be complicated by climbing stairs or participating in adrenaline pumping outdoor thrill sports, this activity may not be recommended.

What to Expect:

The size of each session is limited, so participants can expect to get 3-6 runs depending on weather conditions and efficiency of the group and personal pace. The first 20 minutes of the session you will receive instruction from an experienced luge coach about safety and equipment. During free sliding time, coaches will be positioned along the track to give you instruction throughout the session. The last 15 minutes of each session is set aside for participant certificates and a medals ceremony.


A Raisin in the Sun
Friday, February 16- March 3 @ 7:00 pm – March 3 @ 7:00 pm

Come to the Beardsley Theater for “A Raisin in the Sun,” presented by the Muskegon Civic Theatre! Set on Chicago’s South Side, the plot revolves around the divergent dreams and conflicts within three generations of the Younger family: son Walter Lee, his wife Ruth, his sister Beneatha, his son Travis, and matriarch Lena. When her deceased husband’s insurance money comes through, Mama Lena dreams of moving to a new home in a better neighborhood in Chicago. Walter Lee, a chauffeur, has other plans: buying a liquor store and being his own man. Beneatha dreams of medical school. The tensions and prejudice they face form this seminal American drama. The Younger family’s heroic struggle to retain dignity in a harsh and changing world is a searing and timeless document of hope and inspiration. For more information, call 231-727-8001.


Dancing with the Local Stars 2018
Friday, February 16- Saturday 17 & Feb 22-24

Muskegon’s highly popular charity event, Dancing with the Local Stars, is back for its 10th star-studded year and accepting applications from local food pantries and food programs.The event, produced by the Women’s Division Chamber of Commerce, benefits food pantries and food programs in Muskegon, upper Ottawa and lower Oceana counties. The first nine events enabled WDCC to donate more than $755,000 to those food-giving organizations thanks to generous community members and business leaders. Traditionally, Dancing with the Local Stars pairs local dignitaries, business leaders and people of interest with local dance professionals in four performances. However, this year’s event will feature more than 60 returning cast members in nine dance teams with 11 professional dancers in six performances happening February 16-17 and February 22-24, at the Holiday Inn & Conference Center Downtown Muskegon. To apply for funds from the event, food pantries and food programs should download the WDCC Donation Request Form found under the “Quick Links” on the home page at www.womensdivision.org. Completed applications must be submitted by January 15, 2018 to Women’s Division Chamber of Commerce, Ways & Means Committee, P.O. Box 1665, Muskegon, MI 49443. WDCC will inform donation recipients in April after the event.


Wine Away the Winter Blues
Friday, February 16 @ 7:00 pm – 11:00 pm

Come to SE4SONS and “Wine Away the Winter Blues,” featuring the Rick Hicks Band. Tickets are $20 per person and include four hours of live music, five 2 oz. pours and light appetizers. Se4sons is located in the Muskegon Country Club, 2801 Lakeshore Dr. This is open to the public. Join them for dinner before, during or after at SE4SONS Gastropub. Be sure to make your reservations early by calling 231-759-3405.


Free Fishing Weekend
Saturday, February 17 – February 18

Michigan’s Free Fishing Weekends: An annual tradition. Two days twice a year, families and friends can enjoy one of Michigan’s premiere outdoor activities, Michigan Fishing, for FREE!

All fishing license fees will be waived for two days. Residents and out-of-state visitors may enjoy fishing on both inland and Great Lakes’ waters for all species of fish. All fishing regulations will still apply. For many, the annual Free Fishing Weekend has become a tradition – a time to get together and have some fishing fun. While some may find time to reflect while fishing, there are no limits to variations on a great theme!


Pierogis and Dumplings with Chef Char
Saturday, February 17 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

You’re invited to Kitchen 242 for the culinary class, “Pierogis and Dumplings with Chef Char!” In this class, you’ll work with two similar types of dough to make a classic American comfort food and a traditional Polish treat. Pierogis will be constructed and stuffed with an assortment of fillings before cooked or prepared for your freezer. Fluffy dumplings will also be prepared to make a hearty kettle of chicken and dumplings to try in class or take home. Sign up for classes at Eventbrite.com or call 231-769-2202 for more information. The cost is $40.


Valentine’s Day Murder Mystery Special
Saturday, February 17 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Bring your sweetie to the Back Alley Comedy Club, 1531 W. Sherman Blvd. (in Sherman Bowling Center) for the Valentine’s Day Murder Mystery Special! Your evening begins with a delicious dinner catered by Ryke’s, then it’s Clue style goodness that happens right in front of your table. The moment you walk through the door you will be immersed in a thrilling murder mystery experience, mingling with crazy characters and shady suspects in a game of murder you get to play! As the night continues you will get to interrogate the suspects, gather the clues, and work with your team to help their mystery experts crack the case before the killer gets away! Tickets are $40 when at Sherman Bowling Center or $42 when purchased online. Pre-Show drinks and mingling begin at 7:00pm with dinner at 7:30pm. The show will begin at 8:00pm. For more information, call (231) 755-1258 or visit the website below.


Indoor Farmers’ Market
Saturday @ 9:00 am – 2:00 pm

The Muskegon Farmers’ Market invites you to come inside their warm barn and shop this winter! They’re open every Saturday from 9:00am – 2:00pm, November – April. They will be closed Saturday, December 30. For more information, call (231) 722-3251.


Spring Film Fest
Sunday, February 18 @ 2:00 pm

Every Sunday at 2:00pm, February 11 – March 25, come to the Harbor Theater, 1937 Lakeshore Dr. in Lakeside for the Spring Film Fest to benefit Muskegon’s historic military vessels! Tickets are only $6. For more information, call (231) 375-5228. Today you will view “African Queen


Winners and Winds
Sunday, February 18 @ 4:00 pm    

Come to the Frauenthal Center, 425 W. Western Ave. for “Winners and Winds,” presented by the West Michigan Concert Winds! The Winds will honor senior solo scholarship recipients, as well as share the stage with two area high school band members and their conductor. Tickets are $12 for adults and students. Children under 18 are free with a ticketed adult. For more information, call 231-727-8001.


Authentic African Cuisine with Chef Damon
Sunday, February 18 @ 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm      

February is African Heritage Month! Sunday, February 18 from 5:00pm – 8:00pm, Kitchen 242 inside the Muskegon Farmers’ Market, 242 W. Western Ave. will celebrate by exploring the many essences of authentic African Cuisine and prepare a four course meal that you will sit and enjoy at the end of class. This four course meal will utilize local, seasonal market ingredients. The cost is $50. For more information, call (231) 769-2202. The Menu: •Callaloo •Shrimp Piri Piri, •Lamb Curry & Yellow Rice •Banana Fritters & Pure Honey


The Vietnam War: A Film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick
Monday, February 19 @ 6:00 pm

Come to the USS Silversides Submarine Museum, 1346 Bluff St. for The Vietnam War by Ken Burns! This film will be followed by a discussion. Admission is free with the purchase of museum admission. Members are free. For more information, call 231-755-1230


The Ebony Road Players: The Meeting
Monday, February 19 @ 7:00 pm   

The Norton Shores Library, 705 Seminole Rd., hosts The Ebony Road Players as they perform excerpts from the play “The Meeting.” This is a fascinating and eloquent play by Jeff Stetson that depicts the supposed meeting of two of the most important men of modern times: Malcolm X and Dr. Martin Luther. Differing in their philosophies, but alike in their mutual respect, the two men debate their varying approaches to the same grave social problems, both prepared to die for their beliefs but neither aware of how soon their assassins’ bullets await them. No registration or tickets required.

This production is designed to tie in with “X: A Novel,” the 2017-2018 Great Michigan Read title. The Great Michigan Read is intended for young adults to senior citizens, with broad goals of making literature more accessible and appealing while also encouraging residents to learn more about our state and individual identities. Copies of “X: A Novel” are available at the Library to check out now while supplies last.

This program, funded by the Friends of the Norton Shores Library and the Almeda Boulton Memorial Fund of the Community Foundation of Muskegon County, is free and open to the public with no registration required.   For additional information, contact Alison Purgiel, lead librarian, at 231-780-8844 or apurgiel@madl.org .

Visit our website
www.visitmuskegon.org
www.facebook.com/visitmuskegon
www.twitter.com/visitmuskegon

SCHA-MI Honors Advocates with Apple, Marilynn Keeslar Awards

Every year, the School-Community Health Alliance of Michigan recognizes advocates who make outstanding contributions to school-based health centers. This year, we received over a dozen nominations from some of the most dedicated supporters of school-based health. They ranged from volunteers and funders, to practitioners and CEOs.

Apple Winner Co-Winners: Mark and Christine Fazakerley; and Linda Juarez

schami

Pictured: Linda Juarez (middle)

Mark and Christine Fazakerley are loyal advocates for the health and wellness of the community they call home.  A few years ago, they noted a critical need for health care in Oakridge Public Schools where their children had graduated and their grandchildren now attend.  They worked with the schools, helped to assess the needs, and provided private funding for a community health worker. This initial philanthropic investment spurred a movement to develop a school-based health center which opened in December 2015.  The Fazakerley family was a key supporter as well as a catalyst for generating community funding for the construction of the clinic.  The compassion, vision, advocacy, and philanthropy of the Fazakerley family was key to the launch of this health center that now serves hundreds of students with medical, dental, and behavioral health care.

Linda Juarez is a champion for school-based health care.  She leads a team of 180 employees at Hackley Community Care which operates two school-based health centers, serves four satellite schools, and supports additional behavioral health centers.  When Oakridge Public Schools Superintendent Tom Livezey was looking to bring health services to his students, Linda and her team joined the effort, brought expertise to the project, and helped to rally community support. Before long the two were celebrating the opening of the Oakridge Teen Health Center at Oakridge Middle and High School campus.  The area had been a healthcare desert, with not one medical or dental practice in the school district and no public transportation to travel to care. These factors left students without access to care. The clinic now provides medical, dental, and behavioral health services to students in a safe and welcoming environment.  Linda’s strong leadership and care for the students has really made a difference in this community.

“Each time someone stands up for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others… he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope.” – Robert Kennedy

A State Of Grace

By Mike Simcik

This last Christmas Eve my wife and I went to church in the early evening. A gentle snow fell, it was indeed a silent night, a holy night and all was calm. Of course, the decorations inside abound with poinsettias, and lighted Christmas trees bordering the altar. This pristine setting was pretty much the same as I remember in years past.

We sat and listened to the sermon about the events of the past. Everyone was quiet except for a few fidgety babies not yet impressed with the liturgy and the point of interest. We sang songs about the Christ Child and the miracle of birth. We listened to how and why he was placed here on earth. After all, it is common knowledge that we are sinners by nature and it would take nothing less than an act of God to save us from ourselves.

A second thought had occurred to me, we know that Christ was born to teach us a better way to live our lives. We know he died to pardon and forgive us our sins. But is it absolutely necessary for us to sin quite so often and in so many ways?

Everything that night in church appeared the same, except me, this time I became acutely aware of my surroundings. It was no secret that I was not a member of this church like my wife is but I attended service with her on all the special occasions throughout the year.

No one took notice of my presence there because I always knew that Christians opened their hearts to all that believe in God and Christ. This year I noticed so many things about the others as they prayed, sang, and knelt in the pews before the altar.

As the parishioners walked up to the altar to receive holy communion, heads bowed in reverence, then returning to their pews, I noticed their faces. It became clear to me that these individuals were in a state of grace. For a brief hour or so, these Christians no feelings of persecution, injustice, or malice towards anyone else.

I had wondered, perhaps we should attend church six days a week for an hour free of sin, anger, and fear and on the seventh day give ourselves a rest from the turbulent world we live in.

Wouldn’t be nice, instead of hearing an irritating alarm clock buzzing every morning, we listen to Louis Armstrong’s old song, What A Wonderful World. Maybe that will put us in a state of grace before getting to that daily workplace.

Caleb Przybylek’s First Buck

by Rich Przybylek

calebsbuck

Caleb Przybylek’s first buck, a 6pt, shot on November 3 with a crossbow at 25 yards out. He has a heck of a story if you want to hear it. He is a 7 th grade student at Fruitport Middle School .

Let me start by telling you that I was not too enthused about hunting this year. That’s until Caleb came home from school about a week before the youth hunt, and told me he wanted to hunt and shoot a deer this year. I am an avid hunter and I have definitely been blessed but just felt like my hunting was missing something. Well I got our crossbow out and we went and sighted it in and let’s just say Caleb only needed to take one practice shot, bullseye first shot at 20 yards. So the youth weekend was here and it was gonna be miserably hot. I warned him that it was probably gonna be too hot to see deer, and we saw none. I was worried, for I just got him to hunt and not seeing deer can be a turn off and he told me he didn’t care to see deer he just wanted to spend time with me😢. It’s now the third week of bow and I can’t get him to come back out with me, but he got me excited about being out and I shot a 5pt. We hunt state land so just seeing bucks at times is tough. I went up on the 27th of October again by myself and I had a real nice 6pt coming in but I could not shoot it but knew my son could and that this might boost his confidence. I came and talked him in to going by telling him I guarantee you’ll shoot a deer, possibly a buck. I convinced him to go with me on Friday nov. 3rd and not 20 minutes in the stand, 4:15 to be exact the 6pt was coming in. I had Caleb pick up the bow, turn the safety off, and get ready. I could see he was getting nervous. He was shaking and breathing hard so I whispered to him over and over to take deep breaths and calm down. I also told him to aim at his shoulder and to not take it off. Caleb had to hold the red dot on him for 10 minutes until he cleared a few trees. He was doing so great being patient letting that buck take his time and he did not speed the shot, I teach him to never take bad shots. Finally the buck turned his head only to look behind him and in doing so he stepped forward a foot giving my son a shot. I was gonna tell him to shoot but before I could he did. Direct hit right through the heart, it only ran 20 yards and dropped. The deer did not suffer, for it was a perfect shot. I look to Caleb and say good shot and grab the crossbow so he doesn’t drop it in excitement. Then I noticed Caleb was in full tears.. I asked if he was crying because he’s sad he killed a deer and he said no. I said why then do you cry, he says to me these are tears of glory dad, I never thought I would ever shoot a buck. He didn’t know but I shed a tear myself, because I knew exactly what I was missing in my hunting, my new hunting partner Caleb. On the way home the fun competition and heckling started toward me, Caleb was teasing by saying I shot a bigger deer than you dad. I smiled and said yes! Yes you did. I so look forward to future hunting with him and my other 3 kids in the future. Thanks for letting me tell you this, Caleb is an amazing 12 year old trying to find who he is like most boys and girls his age and he lacks confidence in himself. After this hunt, I’ve seen a change in him and see him starting to gain confidence.

Fruitport Township Board Meeting Agenda – 02/12/18

AGENDA
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP BOARD OF TRUSTEES
FRUITPORT TOWNSHIP HALL
5865 AIRLINE ROAD, FRUITPORT, MI 49415

FEBRUARY 12, 2018

6:30 P.M. WORK SESSION
7:00 P.M. BOARD MEETING

01. Pledge of Allegiance
02. Roll call
03. Approval of board minutes: 1/22/2018
04. Approve / amend agenda
05. Correspondence / reports
06. Public comments regarding agenda items

07. Unfinished Business
A. Employee handbook
B. Land use fees resolution
C. Trustee appointment
D. Swear-in newly appointed Trustee

08. New Business
A. Swearing in new Firefighters
B. Extrication demonstration and discussion
C. Police Department vacancy
D. Quarterline water main
E. 2018-2019 budget discussion

09. Approval of Bills
10. Reports
11. Public Comments
12. Adjournment

The Township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the following Township Clerk: Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Township Hall, 5865 Airline Road, Fruitport, MI 49415 (231) 865-3151

How You Get Norovirus

norovirusHaving direct physical contact with a person who is infected, such as caring for or shaking hands with a sick person and then touching your hands to your mouth.

Eating food or drinking liquids that are contaminated with norovirus.

Touching surfaces or objects with norovirus on them and then putting your hands in your mouth.

People with norovirus illness are most contagious from the moment they begin feeling ill and for the first few days after they recover. Some people may be contagious for even longer.

“We are receiving an increase in stomach virus reporting. Primary outbreaks are within school and childcare settings. To reduce the risk of illness in our community, people need to take preventive measures to stay healthy,” said Marcia Mansaray, epidemiologist.

Protect Yourself and Others from Norovirus
•  Wash hands with soap and water, especially after using the toilet and changing diapers – and always before eating or preparing food. Hand sanitizers are generally not effective for norovirus

•  Handle and prepare food safely. People with norovirus illness should not prepare food for others while they have symptoms and for at least two days after they recover from their illness.

•  Clean and disinfect contaminated surfaces (such as toilets, counters and doorknobs). Always clean up the entire area immediately after someone with norovirus vomits or has diarrhea. Put on disposable gloves and disinfect contaminated surfaces using a bleach-based household cleaner as directed on the product label or with a solution of five tablespoons of bleach to a gallon of water.

•  Wash laundry thoroughly. Immediately remove and wash clothing or linens that may be contaminated with vomit or stool. Handle soiled items carefully – try not to shake them – to avoid spreading the virus. If available, wear disposable gloves while handling soiled clothing or linens and wash your hands after handling.

•  Stay home if sick for at least 24 hours after symptoms end to avoid spreading the illness to others.

For more information, visit www.cdc.gov/norovirus.

Ask Dr. Universe – Parasites

Dear Dr. Universe: What can you tell me about parasites? -Brianna, 12, Eastern Wash.

Dear Brianna,

A parasite is an organism that steals resources from another organism in order to survive. Our planet is home to all kinds of parasites and organisms that host them.

My friends Kevin Zobrist and Lisa Shipley, scientists at Washington State University, told me about a few holiday-inspired parasites. After all, ‘tis the season.

The first parasite is a type of plant that people often smooch under around the holidays: mistletoe. There are a lot of species of mistletoe, explains Zobrist, a forester at WSU.

An example in the Pacific Northwest is hemlock dwarf mistletoe, which explosively releases sticky seeds during the summer. The seeds can fly up to 50 feet and stick to tree branches they fall on. When the seeds land on trees like western hemlock (the state tree of Washington), the mistletoe starts to grow.

Some kinds of mistletoe have leaves they can use to take in sunlight and help make food. But they still aren’t able to get enough food on their own. They have to feed off trees. Dwarf mistletoes don’t have any leaves. They get everything they need from their host.

In the process, this little mistletoe parasite causes trees to form weird clumps called “witch’s brooms” that can ultimately end up killing them. While the trees might die and become snags of dead wood, this can actually be a good thing for the forest ecosystems.

Zobrist explained that some animals, including some endangered species, will use witch’s broom branches or the insides of dead trees to make their habitat or nest. Even though the parasite takes life from the tree, it’s not all bad for life in the forest.

While some parasites live off plants, other parasites need animals. Lisa Shipley, a WSU professor who works with animals in the deer family, said some reindeers are host to a parasite that is so small we’d need a microscope to see it. It’s a kind of nematode more commonly called a brain worm.

Before the nematode finds the reindeer host, it lives in a different animal. When it’s young, it will go into the slimy bottom part of a snail, called its foot.

As snails slide along leaves of plants, reindeer that are munching on leaves will sometimes eat a snail, too. When they eat the snail, they eat the young nematode. The young nematodes move through the body and are eventually pooped out. But along the way, they can lay eggs and cause damage to the reindeer’s brain.

“The worm can be treated with parasite medications, so if you have your own reindeer—like some people in the North Pole do—you can give them medicine,” Shipley said.

Mistletoe and nematodes are just two of many parasites. Other parasites like ticks or fleas rely on hosts like us cats to get their food. Parasites can be inconvenient and even deadly, but to them, it’s all about survival.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Missing Dog

titanTitan has been missing since December. He is male one blue eye one brown he is three years old, if you’ve seen him or have any information please contact me at (231)-736-9416

Kira Fisher

United Way of the Lakeshore Announces Free Tax Filing Tool and Personal Support for ALICE

(MUSKEGON, MI) – Today, United Way of the Lakeshore announced two free options for people to file their income taxes. The online system is MyFreeTaxes, a product of H&R Block. It allows most filers to complete their taxes online in under one hour. For those seeking in-person help, Goodwill Industries in the Lakeshore Region administers VITA, the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance program that uses MyFreeTaxes to file taxes for taxpayers needing assistance. Income eligible people are invited to schedule an appointment by calling 2-1-1.

The United Way has partnered over the past decade with H&R Block and Goodwill Industries of West Michigan to provide free tax filing services for federal and state taxes, the partnerships have helped people file their returns, bringing more refunds back to help their families in our local communities. These resources are a direct benefit to ALICE – Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed. These people work across the Lakeshore Region yet struggle to meet their families’ basic needs.

“Tax season is a source of confusion and stress for most Americans,” said Christine J. Robere, President & CEO, United Way of the Lakeshore. “Many are worried they’ll make a mistake, won’t get their full refund or will pay too much. With MyFreeTaxes, filers can get support from IRS-certified specialists and cut down the time it takes to complete their returns online.” Robere added, “Otherwise, income tax filers who want personalized customer service can feel free to call 2-1-1 to schedule an appointment with a VITA specialist to have their taxes prepared in person. Either way, these are two wonderful options to help people file their taxes and put money in their pockets.”

Taxpayers earning less than $66,000 can either call 2-1-1 for a personal appointment, or enter their data through MyFreeTaxes.com. This links to a secure H&R Block website, making it easy to complete their federal and state taxes from home, at work or on mobile devices. It offers unlimited, personalized real-time chat and phone support in English and Spanish from IRS-certified specialists at 1-855-MY-TX-HELP. The helpline operates from January 22 through April 30, 2018 from 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. EST Monday through Friday, and from noon to 9:00 p.m. EST on Saturdays.

United Way of the Lakeshore is uniting to inspire change and build thriving communities. Our Bold Goal – 10,000 more working families meet their basic needs by 2025. For more information, contact United Way of the Lakeshore at 231-722-3134 or visit www.unitedwaylakeshore.org.

Give Kids a Smile Day

givekidsasmileDr. Robert Kamminga was the dentist on the Ottawa County Department of Public Health’s Miles of Smiles mobile dental unit this past Friday, Feb. 2 for Give Kids a Smile Day. He provided comprehensive dental care for Medicaid insured and financially qualifying uninsured children at Great Lakes Elementary. Every child received a gift bag complete with a toothbrush, toothpaste, prize and oral health education.

“Our Miles of Smiles program is the best example of a community collaborative effort that I could ever envision,” said Debra Bassett, RDH, BHS Ottawa County Department of Public Health Oral Health Supervisor.

Pain from untreated dental disease makes it difficult for children to eat, sleep and concentrate in school. Poor oral health also affects their self-esteem.

Ottawa County Department of Public Health Miles of Smiles mobile dental unit provides dental services for Medicaid insured and financially qualifying uninsured children in Ottawa County. Partners include dental society involvement, dentist and hygienist volunteers, school administration dedication, community support, funder’s generosity, Ottawa County Administration support and Ottawa County Department of Public Health’s commitment to help improve the health of children.

Please call 1-800-467-5905 to schedule an appointment for your child if they are in need of a dentist, have Medicaid or are uninsured and qualify for the free/reduced lunch program.

Scolnik Healing Center of Harbor Hospice Now Accepting Applications for 25th Annual Camp Courage 2018

campcourageHarbor Hospice has been offering Camp Courage for 24 years as a way to help children and their families following the death of a loved one. The emotions of grief can be overwhelming and isolating for children who have not yet developed the verbal and emotional skills to navigate the grief process.

Children grieve differently than adults and need time to just “be kids” as well as time to honor and remember their loved one. Kids often feel alone in their grief and thrive when able to connect with others who understand their unique experience.

Harbor Hospice staff and trained volunteers create a safe, stable environment for children to explore and express their grief, remember their loved one, and connect with others who have experienced a death. Children participate in traditional camp activities such as swimming, hiking and campfires, along with grief-tailored activities that teach healthy coping skills.

Camp Courage, an overnight camping experience for children ages 6-12 and teens 15-19 as Junior Counselors, is held at Pioneer Trails on Big Blue Lake in Muskegon County beginning Friday, June 22, 2018 at 10:00 am through Sunday, June 24, 2018 at 2:00 pm. Application deadline is May 31, 2018. The only cost for camp is a one-time $10 registration fee. For more information or to register, contact Laura Ecker or Melanie Dekkers at 231.728.3442 or 1.800.497.9559 or email info@HarborHospiceMI.org or visit our website at HarborHospiceMI.org.

https://harborhospicemi.org/resources/camp-courage/

Frauenthal Center Presents: Comedian Louie Anderson

louieanderson

Date: March 9, 2018
Time: 7:30 pm
Place: Frauenthal Theater
Tickets: $29 – $49

Muskegon, MI — Iconic comedian Louie Anderson takes the Frauenthal stage in a one-night only hilarious stand-up act! The three-time Emmy Award winner is one of the country’s most recognized and adored comics; named by Comedy Central as “One of 100 Greatest Stand-Up Comedians of All Time.”

With a career spanning more than 30 years, Anderson currently co-stars in the hit FX comedy series Baskets, winning the 2016 Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series. He is a best-selling author, star of his own stand-up specials and sitcoms and he continues to tour the country performing to standing-room-only crowds worldwide.

Tickets are $29 – $49 and can be purchased at the Frauenthal Box Office via phone at 231.727.8001 or in person, open Monday – Friday from 11:00am to 5:30pm or by calling Star Tickets at 1.800.585.3737. Tickets can also be purchased at startickets.com.

Frauenthal Center Presents Richard Dowling: The Music of Scott Joplin

Date: Sunday, March 4, 2018
Time: 3:00 pm
Place: Frauenthal Theater
Tickets: $20 – $30 / $12 Youth

Muskegon, MI — RICHARD DOWLING: THE MUSIC OF SCOTT JOPLIN‘s piano concert features the beloved Scott Joplin ragtime piano works used in the 1973 Academy Award winning movie, “The Sting,” (including The Entertainer) plus many other dazzling, delightful, and rarely-heard Joplin compositions.

The program features an Audience Choice selection — a Joplin work randomly selected by an audience member from the remaining complete Joplin piano repertoire (53 rags, waltzes, marches and cakewalks). Richard Dowling is the first pianist in the world to perform all of Scott Joplin’s piano works in public. On April 1, 2017 — exactly 100 years to the day that Joplin died in New York City — Mr. Dowling performed the complete Joplin cycle in two historic sold-out recitals at Carnegie Hall in New York. Rivermont Records recently released Mr. Dowling’s 3-CD definitive set of The Complete Piano Works of Scott Joplin, recorded on a magnificent Hamburg Steinway concert grand piano.

Tickets are $20 – $30 Adult / $12 Youth (18 and under) and can be purchased at the Frauenthal Box Office via phone at 231.727.8001 or in person, open Monday – Friday from 11:00am to 5:30pm or by calling Star Tickets at 1.800.585.3737. Tickets can also be purchased at startickets.com.

Watch Muskegon Beautification

WATCH MUSKEGON… BEAUTIFY

watchusgoThe goal of the Watch Muskegon Campaign is to enhance the overall image of the Muskegon area and to share positive changes both locally and regionally – early data results show that our efforts are working!

As we continue to focus on our three pillars of Education, Beautification, and Marketing, we’d like to share how the Watch Muskegon campaign has made an impact with Beautification!

DID YOU KNOW?

The Watch Muskegon Beautification pillar focuses on Muskegon County with an emphasis on one of our main corridors, Sherman Boulevard. We began our beautification process with a study identifying ways to improve Sherman Boulevard. A complete link to the Beautification Study can be found here. Since the beginning of the campaign, Watch Muskegon has…

verticaltwo• Created and been involved with multiple clean-up projects along Sherman Blvd.
• Coordinated a major clean-up project on Sherman Blvd. which included curb enhancements on a 1.5 mile stretch from Seaway Dr. to Getty St.
• Began an implementation strategy for gateway features in key areas along Sherman Blvd. from US-31 to Lake Michigan.
• Identified multiple locations for pocket parks on Sherman Blvd. and began the approval process for one pocket park.
• Facilitated an Adopt-a-Lot Program.
horizontaltwos• Added permanent trash receptacles in locations with significant foot traffic and debris.
• Worked with organizations to clean-up blighted properties.
• Painted fencing along Sherman Blvd.
• Researched and drafted a proposal for an anti-litter campaign.
• Created relationships with municipalities, local residents and businesses along Sherman Blvd. to implement change.

GET INVOLVED!

The Watch Muskegon campaign is comprised of several local businesses and individuals throughout Muskegon County and is funded 100% by private donations. The “US” in WATCH US GO is everyone, and anyone can be part of the positive change!

SIGN UP FOR THE WATCH MUSKEGON NEWSLETTER

HELP SUPPORT ANOTHER 3 YEAR CAMPAIGN

Have questions? Contact Carla Flanders at cflanders@muskegon.org.

 

Fruitport Township Planning Commission Meeting Agenda – 01/16/18

AGENDA

PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP
5865 AIRLINE RD
FRUITPORT, MI 49415

January 16, 2018
6:30 PM WORK SESSION
7:00 PM BOARD MEETING

WORK SESSION
Continue review of ordinances

BOARD MEETING
01. Roll Call
02. Approval of Planning Commission Minutes: December 19th, 2017
03. Approve / Amend Agenda
04. Correspondence / Reports
05. Public Comments pertaining to agenda topics

New Business
06. Special Use: Timothy L. Bakker, 2028 E. Hile Road
Parcel: 61-15-640-000-0001-10
Purpose: Retain Federal Firearms License (FFL)
– No business to be conducted at this address

Old Business
None

07. Public Comments
08. Adjournment

The township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the Township Clerk: Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Charter Township, 5865 Airline Rd, Fruitport, MI 49415 (231) 865-3151.

Fruitport Township Planning Commission Meeting Minutes – 12/19/17

MINUTES

PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP
5865 AIRLINE RD
FRUITPORT, MI 49415

December 19, 2017
6:30 PM WORK SESSION
7:00 PM BOARD MEETING

WORK SESSION 

Continue review of ordinances.42-92, B 1, Change “Ag Agricultural” to “R-4, R6, or the R-1”. Next week start at 42-93.

BOARD MEETING 

Chair Michelli called meeting to order at 7:01.

01. Roll Call: Chair Michelli, Kyle Osterhart, Brett Suchecki, Jason Franklin, Geoff Newmyer, Matthew Farrar, Jeff Jacobs. Staff present, Lela Miller, Supervisor Tice, & Jacob Mason.

02. Approval of Planning Commission Minutes: December 6th, 2017. Motion by Jacobs to accept the minutes as changed. Support by Franklin and carried.

03. Approve / Amend Agenda: Agenda accepted by the chair as presented

04. Correspondence / Reports: Chair Michelli referenced the memo from Lesli Lehner relative to the noise ordinance violation alleged. The PC prefers to let the problem be solved rather than change an ordinance to regulate garbage pick-up times. Board discussed the issue on Pleasantwood that was brought to the PC’s attention in July of 2017 relative to trailers which a resident views as trailer blight. All trailers are in compliance and registered. There is no prohibition against utility trailers in the yard. The PC does not wish to change the ordinance to prohibit utility trailers in the front yard.

05. Public Comments pertaining to agenda topics: None.

New Business 

06. Special Use / Site Plan – LRBOI / All Seasons RV
Parcel: 61-15-115-300-0026-00
Purpose: Storage of non-motorized recreational vehicles

Motion by Osterhart, supported by Newmyer to open public hearing.

Ed Geerlings 4701 Airline Road. Stated they wanted to lease Tribal land to store non- motorized RV’s. The RV’s will be fenced in and stored on existing pavement. They proposed to use 30,000 square feet of the property. This would be overflow of duplicate models so customers would not be on the site. The stored units would not have gas or batteries in them until they are moved across the street.

Motion by Jacobs, supported by Newmyer to close the public hearing. Unanimous.

1. The motion is made by Osterhart to grant the special use request for parcel number 61-15-115-300-0026-00 for the following requested special use:

2. The motion is based upon specific findings by the Township relative to the factors specified in Section 42-157 of the Zoning Chapter.

a. The special use [will/will not] be harmonious with and in accordance with the general objectives or with any specific objections of the Master Plan. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): ______________________________ _________________________________________________________________.

b. The special use [will/will not] be designed, constructed, operated, and maintained so as to be harmonious and appropriate in appearance with the existing or intended character of the general vicinity, and it [will/will not] change the essential character of the same area. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): ___________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________.

c. The special use [will/will not] be hazardous or disturbing to existing or future uses. This finding is based upon the following facts: _______________________ _________________________________________________________________.

d. The special use [will/will not] be a substantial improvement to property in the immediate vicinity and to the Township as a whole. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): ________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________.

e. The special use [will/will not] be served adequately by essential public facilities and services, or have them adequately provided by the applicant; facilities and services include highways, streets, police and fire protection, drainage structures, refuse disposal, and schools. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): __________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________.

f. The special use will not create excessive additional requirements at public cost for public facilities and services and [will/will not] be detrimental to the economic welfare of the Township. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): No additional requirements from the Township.

g. The special use will not involve uses, activities, processes, materials, and equipment and conditions of operation that will be detrimental to any persons, property, or the general welfare by reason of excessive production of traffic, noise, smoke, fumes, glare, or odors. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): storage for business only and no public or customers will be brought to the site

h. The special use [will/will not] be consistent with the intent and purposes of the Zoning Chapter. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): ____________ _________________________________________________________________.

i. Any other findings regarding any other factors established by the Zoning Chapter for the proposed special use: __________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________.

3. If the motion is to grant approval, the following conditions are established as authorized by Section 42-158 of the Zoning Chapter.

a. The special use must comply with the site plan, dated 11-13-17, submitted to the Township, as well as any written material submitted by the applicant to the Township.

b. The special use must comply with all federal, state, and Muskegon County laws, rules, regulations, and requirements.

c. The special use must be acquired, developed, and completed in conformance with the Zoning Chapter, as amended, and the rest of the Fruitport Charter Township Code of Ordinances.

d. The construction of the special use must be completed within ____ years. This deadline may be extended by the Township, without going through the entire application process, upon request by the applicant and evidence showing that the applicant is proceeding in good faith toward completion.

e. If the special use approval is contingent upon public water service or public sanitary sewer service or both being provided, then no construction of the special use may begin until all required easements are in place, all required forms have been completed, and all approvals for service have been obtained.

f. A financial guarantee is required as allowed by Section 42-158(d) of the Zoning Chapter. The details of the financial guarantee are: _______________________ _________________________________________________________________.

g. A digital copy of the site plan as approved shall be provided to the Fire Inspector at brian.michelli@mcd911.net, or such other e-mail address as the Fire Inspector may designate.

h. Any other conditions placed by the Township upon the special use: New models only.

Motion was supported by Jacobs. Roll call vote was unanimous.

Old Business 

Motion was made by Jacobs to amend the agenda to include the Journey Church to old business #8.. The motion was supported by Suchecki and carried. 6-1.

08. PC discussed the Journey Church SLU. Staff handed out updated plans from the Consultant/Contractor. General consensus was they met the intent of the elevation changes requested by the PC.

A motion was made by Jacobs to approve the site plan, dated 12-15-17 as submitted. The motion was supported by Newmyer. Motion carried 5-2.

09. Public Comments

10. Adjournment: Chair Michelli adjourned the meeting at 8:20.

The township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the Township Clerk: Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Charter Township, 5865 Airline Rd, Fruitport, MI 49415 (231) 865-3151.

Fruitport Township Planning Commission Meeting Minutes – 12/06/18

MINUTES
PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP
5865 AIRLINE ROAD
FRUITPORT, MI 49415

December 6, 2017
7:00 P.M. BOARD MEETING

BOARD MEETING 

Chair Michelli called the meeting to order at 7:00

1. Roll Call: Present: Jeff Jacobs, Mike Michelli, Kyle Osterhart, Brett Suchecki, Jason Franklin Absent and excused: Matthew Farrar, Geoff Newmyer
2. Approval of Planning Commission Minutes: November 21, 2017 : Chair Michelli corrected athletic in section of New Business item 06. line number 7. to esthetics. Board accepted the minutes with correction.
3. Approve/Amend Agenda: Chair set the meeting agenda as presented.
4. Correspondence/Reports. None.
5. Public comments pertaining to agenda topics.
a. Dale McClain address 432 Farr Rd Norton Shores, MI 49441; owner of 5694 S Quarterline gave the members a letter stating his concerns and pictures; addressing the Journey Church site plan. He suggested a six foot berm in front of parking space 42 to keep the headlights from shining in windows and reduced noise for his renters that are in the Quarterline home. Also concerned that his well is less than 50 foot from proposed drain field. His home has open field and worried that with removal of trees to build, not enough boundary separation. Commissioner Michelli stated the health department would give them the placement of their drain field. Commissioner Jacobs felt a six foot berm may be a bit too high however feels some type of berm there would be prudent.

NEW BUSINESS 

No new business

OLD BUSINESS 

6. Follow up on Special Use / Site Plan – Hughes Builders / Journey Church
Parcel: 61-15-122-100-0020-10
Purpose: Build New House of Worship

Commissioner Franklin would like to see spot elevations on the asphalt. He is concerned the elevations that are given will not retain the water. Stated the retention pond doesn’t calculate for capacity given on the plan, rest of the board agreed. There was much discussion of how the contractors could back up the statement that “all water would remain on the property”.

Representative for Hughes Builders asked if pump for fire suppression can be in the church even though it will hold a small amount of water. Also would like to know if the tank for the system can be buried. Commissioner Jacobs attempted to contact Public Safety Director Brian Michelli, however unable to get through. He then stated they would need to get in touch with Brian and configure it in a way that is approved by him. He also needs to see the materials and specific dimensions and placement of the pump house.

Commissioner Jacobs stated they need to see better detail of the berm, screening at parking spaces 35-42 for water retentions and screening for the neighbors. He stated all trees south of the south drive need to remain for screening purposes; only remove enough for the drive. Commissioner Osterhart agreed either a berm for screening on those parking spaces or omit them.

All Commissioners felt north and south elevations still needed more break up and more plantings. Commissioner Osterhart would like different material on west elevation above the small amount of split block. Suggested to wrap west elevation around to north and south elevation from east. Possible different tones of gray. He was frustrated and felt the Planning Commissioners were having to design the building for Hughes Builders.

Chairman Michelli expressed frustration with the letter from Stephen Parker. He feels the corrections they required at the last meeting were not followed and the reasoning given by Mr. Parker of “no set requirement in the Fruitport Zoning Ordinances” is offensive and inadequate.

Commissioner determined lighting was okay suggested to shine entrance light toward church yet contain on the property. Sign was approved.

Discussion ended with a determination that the site plans needs to come before them again with the changes and corrections.

7. Public Comments: No comments given
8. Work Session: Determined to forego due to time.
9. Adjournment: Chair Michelli adjourned the meeting at 8:45

Fruitport Township Planning Commission Meeting Minutes – 11/21/17

MINUTES

PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP
5865 AIRLINE RD
FRUITPORT, MI 49415

November 21st, 2017
6:30 PM WORK SESSION
7:00 PM BOARD MEETING

WORK SESSION

Continuing review of new zoning ordinances. Begin at 42-88.

No change to 42-88

42-89 D: table. Change gravel to “6” of finished compacted MDOT Aggregate. Eliminate 1100t and change 1.75 inches to “minimum 220# per square yard.” I, 1, add “or engineer of the township’s choosing” after the township engineer.

BOARD MEETING 

Chair Michelli called the meeting to order at 7:05 

01. Roll Call: Mike Michelli, Kyle Osterhart, Brett Suchecki, Geoff Newmyer, Matt Farrar, Jeff Jacobs, & Jason Franklin.

02. Approval of Planning Commission Minutes: October 17th, 2017: Motion by Osterhart to accept the minutes with changing the hours of operations of Item H to “8:00am to 7:00 pm. Motion was supported by Newmyer and carried.

03. Approve / Amend Agenda: Agenda was accepted as presented.

04. Correspondence / Reports: Supervisor Tice presented a request to extend its construction period by 6 months. This was granted by the Supervisor.
Tice also reported the status of the Hazekamp noise complaints. Supervisor Tice feels Hazekamp is in compliance with what the planning commission has approved.

05. Public Comments pertaining to agenda topics:

New Business

Motion by Newmyer, supported by Osterhart to open a public hearing. All in favor.

06. Public Hearing on Special Use / Site Plan – Hughes Builders / Journey Church
Parcel: 61-15-122-400-0020-10
Purpose: Build new House of Worship

Matt Lewis, 847 Torrie Circle. Robert Tusk 3279 east Laketon (Hughes Builders).

Dale McLain 5694 Quarterline requested to see a copy of the plans (Hughes Builders gave him a copy of the plans.

Kyle Osterhart:
1. Did not see the storm water calculations or topography on how the water will get to the retention pond.
2. Commented on the landscaping. Would rather see something other than grass in light of the fact that future development will be medium density residential. Would rather see more plantings.
3. Would like to see some sort of landscape/green area buffers between the development and the existing homes.
4. Ingress/egress: suggests looking at a combined curb-cut.
5. Exterior wal packet on the outside of the building but did not see any parking lot lighting. (Pastor Lewis stated most of the use will be during the day).
6. Utility plan: no public water? (There will be a well and a pump with a 20,000 gallon underground storage for domestic and fire suppression. Hughes stated that they will move the storage tank out from under the building structure.)
7. Exterior elevations: The proposed exterior elevations do not seem to blend into the area with other buildings in the area. Since this is a special use, the PC must be cognizant of esthetics. Recommends some architectural elements on south elevation. East elevation is 22’ of sold metal panel. The west elevation facing the road, the roof is also visible which makes for a lot of metal panel. The south elevation split face block looks very similar to the roof. Like to see difference colors in the steel and architectural elements and details to blend better with the immediate area, along with more landscaping.

Jeff Jacobs affirmed Osterhart’s comments and reiterated this area will be residential and supported more architectural elements and landscaping to better blend with current and future development. Because this is a special use, the PC must be aware of the appearance. Wants to see the storm sewer plan including flows, hydraulics, elevation, and the like.

Pastor Lewis stated they planned on leaving the high density forest in the 20’ buffer zone.

Franklin questioned how the water was to convey from the roof to the pond. Hughes stated it will be piped.

Jacobs prefers if changes are made and it comes back that it be approved by the Chair and Osterhart.

Dale is concerned with a landscaping/buffer between his house and the church. Also concerned with lighting bleeding over to his property.

Jacobs/Newmyer to close. Unanimous.

1. The motion is made by Jacobs to grant the special use request for parcel number(s) 61-15- 122-400-0020-10, for the following requested special use: Journey Church

2. The motion is based upon specific findings by the Township relative to the factors specified in Section 42-157 of the Zoning Chapter.

a. The special use [will/will not] be harmonious with and in accordance with the general objectives or with any specific objections of the Master Plan. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): ______________________________ _________________________________________________________________.

b. The special use [will/will not] be designed, constructed, operated, and maintained so as to be harmonious and appropriate in appearance with the existing or intended character of the general vicinity, and it [will/will not] change the essential character of the same area. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): ___________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________.

c. The special use [will/will not] be hazardous or disturbing to existing or future uses. This finding is based upon the following facts: _______________________ _________________________________________________________________.

d. The special use [will/will not] be a substantial improvement to property in the immediate vicinity and to the Township as a whole. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): ________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________.

e. The special use [will/will not] be served adequately by essential public facilities and services, or have them adequately provided by the applicant; facilities and services include highways, streets, police and fire protection, drainage structures, refuse disposal, and schools. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): __________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________.

f. The special use [will/will not] create excessive additional requirements at public cost for public facilities and services and [will/will not] be detrimental to the economic welfare of the Township. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): ___________________________________________________________.

g. The special use [will/will not] involve uses, activities, processes, materials, and equipment and conditions of operation that will be detrimental to any persons, property, or the general welfare by reason of excessive production of traffic, noise, smoke, fumes, glare, or odors. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): __________________________________________________________.

h. The special use [will/will not] be consistent with the intent and purposes of the Zoning Chapter. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): ____________ _________________________________________________________________.

i. Any other findings regarding any other factors established by the Zoning Chapter for the proposed special use: __________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________.

3. If the motion is to grant approval, the following conditions are established as authorized by Section 42-158 of the Zoning Chapter.

a. The special use must comply with the site plan, dated _______________, submitted to the Township, as well as any written material submitted by the applicant to the Township.

b. The special use must comply with all federal, state, and Muskegon County laws, rules, regulations, and requirements.

c. The special use must be acquired, developed, and completed in conformance with the Zoning Chapter, as amended, and the rest of the Fruitport Charter Township Code of Ordinances.

d. The construction of the special use must be completed within ____ years. This deadline may be extended by the Township, without going through the entire application process, upon request by the applicant and evidence showing that the applicant is proceeding in good faith toward completion.

e. If the special use approval is contingent upon public water service or public sanitary sewer service or both being provided, then no construction of the special use may begin until all required easements are in place, all required forms have been completed, and all approvals for service have been obtained.

f. A financial guarantee is required as allowed by Section 42-158(d) of the Zoning Chapter. The details of the financial guarantee are: _______________________ _________________________________________________________________.

g. A digital copy of the site plan as approved shall be provided to the Fire Inspector at brian.michelli@mcd911.net, or such other e-mail address as the Fire Inspector may designate.

h. Any other conditions placed by the Township upon the special use, to be approved by the PC:

1. Applicant comes back to the PC with the following changes for approval before work begins.
2. Add architectural elements and breakups which can be a color change, design features on the north and west and south elevations suitable for the surrounding area.
3. Detailed water run off plan including roof and parking area including hydraulic calculations
4. Landscape plan that softens the look of the parking lot.
5. Detailed lighting plan.
6. Move suppression tank outside of the building footprint
7. Directional traffic signs shown on plan.
8. Pictures of the natural buffer between the neighbors’ homes,
9. Sign design (this can come back to the chair for approval at a later date).

Motion was supported by Farrar. Roll Call: Unanimous.

07. Site Plan Revision – Walid Jamal (IHOP) – Christian Cini (General Contractor)
Parcel: 61-15-122-100-0009-51
Purpose: Tenant Space Drive Thru

Christian Cini with Newco. Explained they want to add a drive thru to the building (IHOP). Add one window to the south elevation.

They will not lose any parking spaces.

1. The motion is made by Osterhart to grant the site plan request for parcel number(s) 61- 15-122-100-0009-51

2. The motion is based upon specific findings by the Township relative to the factors specified in Section 42-224 of the Zoning Chapter.

a. All elements of the site plan are harmoniously and efficiently organized in relation to topography, the size and type of lot, the character of adjoining property and the type and size of buildings. The site will not impede the normal and orderly development or improvement of surrounding property for permitted uses. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): site plan and building use.

e. Buildings or groups of buildings are arranged as to permit emergency vehicle access. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): Plan will be approved by the public safety department of Fruitport.

f. Every structure or dwelling unit does have access to a public street, walkway, or other area dedicated to common use. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): Site plan

i. Exterior lighting is arranged so that it is deflected away from adjacent properties and will not impede the vision of traffic along adjacent streets. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): site plan

j.

3. If the motion is to grant approval, the following conditions are established.

a. The development must comply with the site plan, dated 1-25-17, submitted to the Township, as well as any written material submitted by the applicant to the Township.

b. The development must comply with all federal, state, and Muskegon County laws, rules, regulations, and requirements.

c. The development must be acquired, developed, and completed in conformance with the Zoning Chapter, as amended, and the rest of the Fruitport Charter Township Code of Ordinances.

d. The development must be completed within 2 years. This deadline may be extended by the Township, without going through the entire application process, upon request by the applicant and evidence showing that the applicant is proceeding in good faith toward completion.

e. If the site plan approval is contingent upon public water service or public sanitary sewer service or both being provided, then no construction of the development may begin until all required easements are in place, all required forms have been completed, and all approvals for service have been obtained.

f. A digital copy of the site plan as approved shall be provided to the Fire Inspector at brian.michelli@mcd911.net, or such other e-mail address as the Fire Inspector may designate.

g. Any other conditions placed by the Township upon the site plan approval: Place internal drive thru signage to divert drive thru traffic shall be placed to the far west isle. 

Supported by Newmyer. Roll call-unanimous

Old Business
None

08. Public Comments

09. Adjournment: 8:34


The township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the Township Clerk: Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Charter Township, 5865 Airline Rd, Fruitport, MI 49415 (231) 865-3151.

Fruitport Township Planning Commission Meeting Minutes – 10/17/17

MINUTES
PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP
5865 AIRLINE RD
FRUITPORT, MI 49415

October 17th, 2017
6:30 PM WORK SESSION
7:00 PM BOARD MEETING

BOARD MEETING: call to order at 7:03

01. Roll Call: Mike Michelli, Brett Suchecki, Jason Franklin, Matthew Farrar, Kyle Osterhart, Jeff Jacobs, Geoff Newmyer. Also present, Supervisor Tice, Jacob Mason, Lela Miller, Mr. Tice.

02. Approval of Planning Commission Minutes: September 19th, 2017: chair Michelli accepted the minutes as presented.

03. Approve / Amend Agenda: Chair Michelli accepted the agenda as presented.

04. Correspondence / Reports. Supervisor reported the lions club will be selling trees at the driving ranges as they do each year. Supervisor to make sure the trees do not interfere with the line of sight.

05. Public Comments pertaining to agenda topics. No comments were heard.

New Business
06. Public Hearing on Special Use – Garry M. VanDyke III
Parcel: 61-15-110-300-0018-00
Purpose: Gunsmith (repairs) within residence

Motion by Newmyer\Jacobs to open public hearing. Unanimous.

No shooting of long guns will occur on the property. The work will be done on the main floor.
There will be an electronic security system and a safe for firearms. All firearms stored on site will be in a safe. This type of work requires a federal license and a FFL. Machinery will include a lathe, drill press, grinders, and the like. Customers will have the option to drop off guns or pick up. Hours of operations are proposed to be 8:00 am to 8:00 pm.

Mr. Kubanek, who lives on Towner on the other site of the site. Concerned if in the future this site could sell guns. Mr. Kubanek is concerned people could target this site due to the future sale of guns. Commissioner Jacobs pointed out that this permit is for working on guns and not for the sale.

Gordon Becklin is concerned about signage and gun sales.

Mr. Tice (8th). Commented on gun shops in general.

Motion by Osterhart/Newmyer to close public hearing. Unanimous.

1. The motion is made by Osterhart to grant the special use request for parcel number(s) 61-15-110-300-0018-00 for the following requested special use: Gunsmith.

2. The motion is based upon specific findings by the Township relative to the factors specified in Section 42-157 of the Zoning Chapter.

b. The special use will be designed, constructed, operated, and maintained so as to be harmonious and appropriate in appearance with the existing or intended character of the general vicinity, and it will not change the essential character of the same area. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): No change to the exterior or site.

d. The special use will not be a substantial improvement to property in the immediate vicinity and to the Township as a whole. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): No change to the exterior.

e. The special use will be served adequately by essential public facilities and services, or have them adequately provided by the applicant; facilities and services include highways, streets, police and fire protection, drainage structures, refuse disposal, and schools. This finding is based upon the following fact(s): No changes to the current site which is adequate.

3. If the motion is to grant approval, the following conditions are established as authorized by Section 42-158 of the Zoning Chapter.

a. The special use must comply with the site plan, dated _______________, submitted to the Township, as well as any written material submitted by the applicant to the Township.

b. The special use must comply with all federal, state, and Muskegon County laws, rules, regulations, and requirements.

c. The special use must be acquired, developed, and completed in conformance with the Zoning Chapter, as amended, and the rest of the Fruitport Charter Township Code of Ordinances.

d. The construction of the special use must be completed within 2 years. This deadline may be extended by the Township, without going through the entire application process, upon request by the applicant and evidence showing that the applicant is proceeding in good faith toward completion.

e. If the special use approval is contingent upon public water service or public sanitary sewer service or both being provided, then no construction of the special use may begin until all required easements are in place, all required forms have been completed, and all approvals for service have been obtained.

f. A financial guarantee is required as allowed by Section 42-158(d) of the Zoning Chapter. The details of the financial guarantee are: _______________________ _________________________________________________________________.

g. A digital copy of the site plan as approved shall be provided to the Fire Inspector at brian.michelli@mcd911.net, or such other e-mail address as the Fire Inspector may designate.

h. Any other conditions placed by the Township upon the special use:
• Licensed FFL specific to gunsmithing,
• No exterior signage,
• Storage and solvents shall reported to and inspected the Fruitport public safety department
• Machining to be separately approved.
• 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. (hours of operations everyday)
• No test firing at the site,
• Electronic security and safes required prior to beginning of operations of business. Safe capacity to cover the number of guns on property.
• No gun sales

Motion supported by Jacobs and carried unanimously on a roll call vote.

Members discussed the animal ordinance.

Old Business
07. Public Comments: None were heard

08. Adjournment: Chair Michelli adjourned the meeting at 8:25

The township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the Township Clerk: Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Charter Township, 5865 Airline Rd, Fruitport, MI 49415 (231) 865-3151.

FCS – Board Workshop Minutes – 01/10/18

Fruitport Board of Education
Board Workshop
January 10, 2018 6:00 p.m.
Board Room

I. The Workshop of the Board of Education was called to order at 6:00 p.m. by Board President, Dave Hazekamp.

II. ROLL CALL: Present – Elroy Buckner, Kris Cole, Susan Franklin, Dave Hazekamp, and Steve Kelly. Absent – Jill Brott and Tim Burgess.

III. APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Item 18-001. MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Cole to approve the agenda as presented.
MOTION CARRIED 5-0

IV. GENERAL BOARD BUSINESS
1. Approval of Regular Meeting Minutes.
Item 18-002. MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Franklin to approve the Regular Meeting Minutes of December 11, 2017.
MOTION CARRIED 5-0

2. Superintendent Evaluation Work
•  Board members discussed the superintendent’s evaluation.

3. Schedule Quarterly Board Workshops
•  Board members were asked to select 4 months to hold Board Workshops.
It was decided to schedule workshops for April, June, September and October.

XVI. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC
None.

XVII. OTHER
•  Board members were asked to think about grouping all committee meetings into one meeting. No decision was made.

•  An update was given on the football coach search.

XVIII. ADJOURNMENT
Item 18-003. MOTION by Hazekamp, SECOND by Buckner to adjourn.
MOTION CARRIED 5-0

The meeting adjourned at 8:25 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,

Steve Kelly, Board Secretary

FCS – Student Affairs Committee Meeting Minutes – 01/16/18

STUDENT AFFAIRS
Tuesday, January 16, 2018
4:30 p.m. ~ Superintendent’s Office
MEETING MINUTES

Attendance: Jill Brott, Susan Franklin, Dave Hazekamp, Allison Camp, Bob Szymoniak

1. The Work-Based Learning high school curricular offering which went through two Instructional Council readings was reviewed and approved for Board action. Implementation to take place the fall of 2018 through the placement of 5 students at work sites.

2. A new Developmental Kindergarten program was reviewed and approved for Board action. Approval at the January Board meeting will allow for continued development of the program toward implementation the fall of 2018.

3. Virtual School for Non-Traditional Students was discussed for informational purposes. Development of the program needs to continue and then be run through Instructional Council for two readings before placed on a Board agenda. Should all go according to plan, the program could be implemented upon Board approval. This would be an on-line program designated for students with health concerns keeping them from school and also for expelled/suspended students.

4. PBIS surveys were discussed and the committee was asked to review the surveys as were presented and offer any feedback before the surveys are implemented. These surveys are primarily for perception and will help drive future PBIS programming.

5. It is being recommended from the committee to no longer count alternative education students in the overall high school student count as reported to the MHSAA for “class” determination.

6. Student behavior was discussed with an emphasis on the importance of fully implementing all the elements of PBIS in order to maximize programming for our most difficult students.

Adjournment at 5:30 p.m.

Respectfully submitted by Bob Szymoniak

FCS – Personnel Committee Meeting Minutes – 01/17/18

PERSONNEL COMMITTEE
Wednesday, January 17, 2018
7:30 a.m. ~ Superintendent’s Office
MEETING MINUTES

Attendance: Dave Hazekamp, Steve Kelly, Tim Burgess, Bob Szymoniak

1. During the January 22, 2018 Board of Education meeting the superintendent will request in writing that the Board go into closed session for the purposes of superintendent evaluation and then return to open session to approve the 2017 superintendent evaluation.

2. Continued dialogue was held regarding the operations director position.

Meeting adjourned at 8:30 a.m.

Respectfully submitted by Bob Szymoniak

FCS – Business and Finance Committee Meeting Minutes – 01/15/18

Business and Finance Committee
Monday, January 15, 2018
11:30 a.m., Superintendent’s Office
Meeting Minutes

Attendance: Dave Hazekamp, Elroy Buckner, Kris Cole, Mark Mesbergen, and Bob Szymoniak

1. Budget
Changes from the Original Budget were discussed. The General Fund budget has a $518,742 unassigned budget deficit and a projected ending unassigned fund balance of $1,974,991 (6.68% of total expenditures). The Special Service Funds were also discussed.

Meeting adjourned at 12:23 p.m.

Respectfully submitted by Mark Mesbergen

Fruitport Board of Education Regular Monthly Meeting – Minutes – 01/22/18

Fruitport Board of Education
Regular Monthly Meeting
January 22, 2018 7:00 p.m.
Beach Elementary Gym

I. The Regular meeting of the Board of Education was called to order at 7:00 p.m. by Superintendent, Bob Szymoniak.

II. The PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE was recited.

III. ROLL CALL: Present – Jill Brott, Elroy Buckner, Tim Burgess, Kris Cole, Susan Franklin, Dave Hazekamp, and Steve Kelly.

IV. ELECTION OF OFFICERS

President
Item 18-004. MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Cole to nominate Dave Hazekamp for President. No other nominations were brought forth.

MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Brott to close nominations and cast a unanimous ballot for Dave Hazekamp for President. Roll Call Vote: Brott, Yes; Buckner, Yes; Burgess, Yes; Cole, Yes; Franklin, Yes; Hazekamp, Yes; and Kelly, Yes.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

Superintendent Szymoniak passed the gavel to President Hazekamp.

Vice President
Item 18-005. MOTION by Franklin, SECOND by Brott to nominate Kris Cole for Vice-President. No other nominations were brought forth.

MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Brott to close nominations and cast a unanimous ballot for Kris Cole for Vice-President. Roll Call Vote: Brott, Yes; Buckner, Yes; Burgess, Yes; Cole, Yes; Franklin, Yes; Hazekamp, Yes; and Kelly, Yes.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

Treasurer
Item 18-006. MOTION by Cole, SECOND by Brott to nominate Elroy Buckner for Treasurer. No other nominations were brought forth.

MOTION by Franklin, SECOND by Brott to close nominations and cast a unanimous ballot for Elroy Buckner for Treasurer. Roll Call Vote: Brott, Yes; Buckner, Yes; Burgess, Yes; Cole, Yes; Franklin, Yes; Hazekamp, Yes; and Kelly, Yes.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

Secretary
Item 18-007. MOTION by Brott, SECOND by Cole to nominate Steve Kelly for Secretary. No other nominations were brought forth.

MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Brott to close nominations and cast a unanimous ballot for Steve Kelly for Secretary. Roll Call Vote: Brott, Yes; Buckner, Yes; Burgess, Yes; Cole, Yes; Franklin, Yes; Hazekamp, Yes; and Kelly, Yes.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

V. APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Item 18-008. MOTION by Cole, SECOND by Brott to approve the agenda with the addition of XI-1 Moving Fiber Due to High School Bond Project and adding “for the Superintendent’s Evaluation” to XVIII Closed Session.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

VI. PRESENTATIONS
Beach teacher, Brian Meagher was presented with an Above and Beyond Award for his help with the Wild For Books bus this summer.

Beach teacher, Amy Carlson and students of the Beach Lego League presented information on their program. They demonstrated how they could problem solve using STEM technology and research. The students shared their “Most Innovative” trophy which they received during their November competition.

High school student, Sydney Bleich presented information on her independent study exploring Cyber Security. Her PowerPoint presentation included a newly designed website, information on Cyber Security and resources to help her followers.

Superintendent, Bob Szymoniak spoke about Board Appreciation Month. He thanked board members for their commitment to Fruitport Community Schools. Art teachers, Dawn Jacobson, Robin Latsch, and Macy King, along with their students presented each board member with a beautifully framed piece of student artwork in honor of Board Appreciation Month.

VII. COMMUNICATIONS
Board Secretary, Steve Kelly read aloud a thank you note from Maribeth Clarke.

VIII. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC
None.

IX. SUPERINTENDENT/ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS
Superintendent, Bob Szymoniak gave a bond update explaining the need to add the Fiber Move to the agenda. He stated that ground breaking of the high school project will happen in late March or early April depending on the weather. He also made the Board aware that bids will be awarded at the February Regular board meeting.

X. CONSENT AGENDA
Item 18-009. MOTION by Brott, SECOND by Buckner to approve the Consent Agenda as presented.
1. Approval of Workshop Minutes of January 10, 2018
2. Acceptance of Bills, Monthly Financial Report, and ACH Transactions
3. Acceptance of Student Activity Summary Report
4. Acceptance of Credit Card and Utilities Report
5. Approval of Personnel Report
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

XI. GENERAL BOARD BUSINESS
1. Approval of the Fiber Move.
Item 18-010. MOTION by Franklin, SECOND by Buckner to approve the expenditure of $31,015 of bond funds to move fiber due to the High School Bond Project as presented.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

XII. BUSINESS AND FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Report of committee meeting held January 15, 2018.
Elroy Buckner reported on a Business and Finance Committee meeting held January 15, 2018. Dave Hazekamp, Elroy Buckner, Kris Cole, Mark Mesbergen, and Bob Szymoniak were present. The committee discussed the budget.

2. Approval of the 2017-18 General Fund Budget Amendment.
Item 18-011. MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Brott to approve the General Fund budget amendment as presented. Roll Call Vote: Brott, Yes; Buckner, Yes; Burgess, Yes; Cole, Yes; Franklin, Yes; Hazekamp, Yes; and Kelly, Yes.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

3. Approval of the 2017-18 School Service Fund Budget Amendment.
Item 18-012. MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Brott to approve the School Service Fund budget amendment as presented. Roll Call Vote: Brott, Yes; Buckner, Yes; Burgess, Yes; Cole, Yes; Franklin, Yes; Hazekamp, Yes; and Kelly, Yes.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

XIII. PERSONNEL COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Report of committee meeting held January 17, 2018.
Steve Kelly reported on a Personnel Committee meeting held January 17, 2018. Dave Hazekamp, Steve Kelly, Tim Burgess, and Bob Szymoniak were present. The committee discussed going into closed session for the superintendent evaluation and the operation director position.

XIV. STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Report of committee meeting held January 16, 2018.
Jill Brott reported on a Student Affairs Committee meeting held January 16, 2018. Dave Hazekamp, Allison Camp, Jill Brott, Susan Franklin, and Bob Szymoniak were present. The committee discussed: Work-Based Learning, Developmental Kindergarten, Virtual School for Non-Traditional Students, PBIS Surveys, MHSAA Class Determination and Student Behavior.

2. Approval of Developmental Kindergarten.
Item 18-013. MOTION by Brott, SECOND by Franklin to approve a Developmental Kindergarten program beginning with the 2018/19 school year as presented.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

3. Approval of the MHSAA Student Count for Class Purposes.
Item 18-014. MOTION by Brott, SECOND by Kelly to approve eliminating Alternative High School students in the overall Fruitport High School student count as reported to the MHSAA for class determination purposes as presented.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

4. Approval of Fruitport High School Work-Based Learning Curricular Program.
Item 18-015. MOTION by Brott, SECOND by Franklin to approve the implementation of a Work-Based Learning curricular program as presented.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

5. Approval of Overnight Trip Requests.
Item 18-016. MOTION by Brott, SECOND by Franklin to approve the following overnight trip requests: Business Professionals of America, March 15-18, 2018, Grand Rapids, MI; Fruitport Bands and Choirs, May 5-6, 2018, Chicago, IL; Fruitport High School Cross Country State Meet, November 2-3, 2018, Brooklyn, MI.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

XV. BOARD MEMBER REPORTS AND DISCUSSIONS
None.

XVI. AGENDA ITEMS for FUTURE MEETINGS & SCHEDULING OF ANY SPECIAL MEETINGS
1. Business and Finance Committee will meet February 12, 2018 at 11:30 a.m.
2. Personnel Committee will meet February 13, 2018 at 7:30 a.m.
3. Student Affairs Committee will meet February 14, 2018 at 4:30 p.m.
4. Board Workshops will be held in April, June, September, and October but no official dates were set.

XVII. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC
Community Member, Dave Rutz addressed the board regarding apprenticeship training through the Sheet Metals Worker Union 7 and schools. He suggested that the Board consider companies who offer an apprenticeship training program when awarding bids. Mr. Rutz invited the superintendent and board members to tour his training facility.

Edgewood Principal, Amy Upham spoke about Spellmasters. She explained that after the January 22nd competition, six students would advance to the Regional Spelling Bee held at our middle school on February 27th.

XVIII. CLOSED SESSION FOR THE SUPERINTENDENT’S EVALUATION
Item 18-017. MOTION by Hazekamp, SECOND by Cole to move into Closed Session. Roll call: Brott, Yes; Buckner, Yes; Burgess, Yes; Cole, Yes; Franklin, Yes; Hazekamp, Yes; Kelly, Yes.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

The Board moved into Closed Session at 8:42 p.m.
The Board returned to Regular Session at 9:19 p.m.

XIX. ADJOURNMENT
Item 18-018. MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Brott to adjourn.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

The meeting adjourned at 9:20 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,

Steve Kelly
Board Secretary

Maribeth Clarke
Recording Secretary

Village of Fruitport – Council Meeting Minutes – 01/15/18

VILLAGE OF FRUITPORT
REGULAR COUNCIL MEETING
JANUARY 15, 2018

1. Call to Order
President Roger Vanderstelt called the meeting to order at 7:01pm.

2. Pledge

3. Prayer

4. Roll call
Present: Roger Vanderstelt, Donna Pope, Amy Haack, Carl Rothenberger, Carl Russell, Bill Stone and Will Overkamp, who arrived at 7:05pm.
Also, present: Dave Bossenbroek, Village attorney and Jeremy Statler, DPW Supervisor

5. Approval of previous meeting minutes
Motion made by Amy Haack to approve the December 18, 2017 meeting minutes, supported by Carl Rothenberger. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

6. Approve the agenda for the January 15, 2018 Council meeting
Motion made by Amy Haack to approve the January 15, 2018 council meeting agenda, supported by Carl Rothenberger. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

7. Public Comments
None

8. Correspondence
None

9. Reports from Officers
Donna reported that the library is doing well. They are still in the process of getting a new director.
Amy will report under Unfinished and New Business later in the meeting.
Carl Rothenberger advised that the Personnel Committee has reviewed a new Compensatory Time Off Policy for DPW full-time employees. Carl gave an overview of the policy. A discussion took place. Motion made by Carl Rothenberger to adopt the new policy, supported by Amy Haack. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.
Will expressed that he would like to join a committee. He is currently part of The Friends of the Park group.
Bill had nothing to report.
Carl Russell gave an update on the Planning Commission’s meeting. The Planning Commission reviewed a survey that will be sent to the community. He discussed ways of advertising and distributing the survey. Ann will send a copy of the survey out to council for review. The survey review and discussion were tabled until the next council meeting.
Roger had nothing to report.

10. Rental Unit Registration Restatement Ordinance
Carl Russell advised that the Planning Commission reviewed the Fruitport Township Rental Registration information. Carl Russell shared the Planning Commission recommendations of giving adequate notice to the landlords and tenants as the Village is discussing whether they will adopt a rental unit registration ordinance. A discussion took place and the item will be tabled until the next council meeting.

11. Honorary Plaque for Park Lighting Project
Roger advised he has been working with Whitehall products on getting the honorary plaque. He will report again at the next council meeting on the status of the plaque order.

12. 270 Pine St. Property Discussion
Roger gave a summary of the request and the diagram received from Mark Oldenberg, 270 Pine Street. Dave Bossenbroek shared additional information with the council. A discussion took place regarding a plat change, an easement or leaving as is. Roger made a motion to leave 270 Pine Street as is, supported by Amy Haack. Dave Bossenbroek will contact Mark Oldenberg to advise.

13. Discussion on Revisions to existing Park Ordinances
Amy discussed a proposal from the Fruitport Village Parks and Recreation group on proposed updates for Pomona Park. She reviewed the related information and proposed rules. Amy worked with Dave Bossenbroek to update sections of Ordinance 92.09. Amy provided a copy of the changes and read the proposed changes. Amy made a motion that we revise the Fruitport Code of Ordinances section 92.09 and post in the Grand Haven Tribune at a cost not to exceed $400.00, supported by Carl Rothenberger. Roll call AYES: Vanderstelt, Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp, Stone and Russell. NAYES: None
Note: the sign at Pomona Park will be update at a future date.

14. Discussion on Establishment of Park Hours for Pomona Park
Amy discussed a proposal from Fruitport Village Parks and Recreation group to establish designated park hours for Pomona Park of 7am – 10pm, year-round. A discussion took place about excluding the Boat launch and updating the signs in the park. Amy made a motion to establish park hours of 7am – 10pm year-round except for the Boat Launch, supported by Carl Rothenberger. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.
Amy made a motion to purchase 7 signs, to display the new park hours and post restricted parking hours for the 4th street parking lot at a cost not to exceed $250.00, supported by Carl Rothenberger. Roll call AYES: Vanderstelt, Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp, Stone and Russell. NAYES: None

15. Public Comment
None

16. Warrants
Motion made by Carl Rothenberger to approve the warrants, supported by Bill Stone. Roll call AYES: Vanderstelt, Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp, Stone and Russell. NAYES: None

17. Adjourn
Motion made by Bill Stone to adjourn, supported by Carl Rothenberger. With a unanimous vote the motion carried at 9:00pm.

Respectfully submitted by,

Ann LaCroix
Clerk

Village of Fruitport – Council Meeting Minutes – 12/18/17

VILLAGE OF FRUITPORT
REGULAR COUNCIL MEETING
DECEMBER 18, 2017

1. Call to Order
President Roger Vanderstelt called the meeting to order at 7:00pm.

2. Pledge

3. Prayer

4. Roll call
Present: Roger Vanderstelt, Donna Pope, Amy Haack, Carl Rothenberger, Carl Russell and Will Overkamp, who arrived at 7:08pm. Absent: Bill Stone
Also, Present: Jeremy Statler, DPW Supervisor and Greg Mason, Cathy Krol and Lesli Lehner from Michigan Township Services.

5. Approval of previous meeting minutes
Ann reported 5 grammar changes to the minutes. Amy Haack, supported by Roger Vanderstelt made a motion to approve the minutes with the changes Ann reported. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

6. Approve the agenda for the December 18th, 2017
Amy clarified that item 10 on the agenda is a discussion about the Rental Unit Registration that was adopted by Fruitport Township. Motion made by Amy Haack, supported by Donna Pope to approve the agenda. With a unanimous vote the motion carried.

7. Public Comments
None

8. Correspondence
None

9. Reports from Officers
Donna reported that things are going well at the Library.
Amy reported that our attorney, Dave Bossenbroek, is reviewing the park ordinances and rules that may be out of date. She will present any suggested changes at an upcoming meeting.
Carl Rothenberger nothing to report.
Carl Russell gave an overview of the recent Planning Commission meeting. The Planning Commission is reviewing the Master Plan and Ordinances. At the last meeting they reviewed a Master Plan Survey. Carl also discussed the Storm Water Ordinance. Jay Bolt, Secretary of the Planning Commission, discussed the survey and the process of distributing it to the community and making residents aware of the Master Plan review process.
Will nothing to report.
Roger advised the council that we received $1,226.00 from the sale of the old snow blower and push blower equipment.
Roger also advised the council that the motion to purchase the Post Pounder for $2,363.00 at the last meeting didn’t include a case. The new cost is $2,587.00. Motion made by Carl Rothenberger, supported by Amy Haack to approve the cost of the Post Pounder to $2,587.00. Roll call AYES: Vanderstelt, Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp and Russell. NAYES: None.
Roger would like to donate Ann’s old desk to the Crockery Township Fire Department. Motion made by Carl Rothenberger, supported by Amy Haack to donate the desk to the Fire Department. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.
Roger discussed that $260.00 was incurred for payroll and equipment used for the Lion’s Club for Old Fashioned Christmas. Roger suggested that the Village absorb half of the charge. Motion made by Carl Russell, supported by Will Overkamp to pay $130.00 towards the $260.00 charge. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.
Roger discussed that we need to focus on saving for the 2020 3rd Street project instead of doing the budget wish list for the next fiscal year.

10. Roger recapped the Fruitport Township Rental Registration and Checklist that was discussed at the last meeting. Greg Mason from Michigan Township Services advised the council that municipalities with over 10,000 residents are required to have a rental ordinance. Cathy Krol from MTS explained that in the Township rentals are required to register with the Assessing Department for a fee of $10. After registering they need to schedule an inspection for a fee of $50.00. A checklist of requirements is provided to the property owner prior to the inspection. Lesli Lehner from MTS discussed safety issues regarding rental properties. Carl Russell thinks that the Planning Commission should review Rental Registration for the Village and make a recommendation to the council. Motion made by Carl Russell to address the Rental Registration at the next Planning Commission meeting, supported by Will Overkamp. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

11. Honorary Plaque and Thank You Letter Update for Lighting
Roger would like to put a Plaque on the Light Pole. He will follow up with more detail on the plaque at the next meeting.

12. 270 Pine St. Presentation (Owner: Mark Oldenburg)
Mark Oldenburg passed out a diagram to the council. He pointed out that his garage, driveway and sprinklers are on Village property. A discussion took place and Roger suggested that Mark and his attorney contact our Village attorney Dave Bossenbroek and DPW Supervisor.

13. Winter Boots
Carl Russell suggested that we purchase Muck Boots for the DPW staff. A discussion took place about the boots. Motion made by Carl Russell, supported by Amy Haack to purchase new boots for the DPW staff at a cost not to exceed $160.00 per person. Roll call AYES: Vanderstelt, Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp and Russell. NAYES: None

14. Public Comment
John Bumstead, 2186 E 77nd Street, Newaygo addressed the council. He was a State Representative from 2010-2016. He is running for the 34th district State Senator. John offered to answer any questions and passed out his business card.

15. Warrants
Motion made by Carl Russell to approve the warrants, supported by Carl Rothenberger. Roll call AYES: Vanderstelt, Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp and Russell. NAYES: None

16. Adjourn
Motion made by Donna Pope to adjourn, supported by Carl Rothenberger. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried at 8:12pm.

Respectfully submitted by,

Ann LaCroix
Clerk

Muskegon County Calendar of Events February 5-12, 2018

Presented by the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau
www.visitmuskegon.org


Planetarium Show: Faster than Light! The Dream of Interstellar Flight
Tuesdays and Thursdays 7:00 pm – 7:35 pm

January 16 – March 29 on Tuesdays and Thursdays, come to Carr-Fles Planetarium for “Faster than Light!  The Dream of Interstellar Flight!”  The impulse to strike out into the unknown, to see what’s over the horizon is as old as humanity.  Today, a whole new horizon beckons.  Scientists now believe that our galaxy is filled with solar systems, including up to 9 billion Sun-like stars with planets similar to Earth.  Astronomers are racing to find habitable worlds, including any that might exist in the neighborhood of our Sun.  But if we find one, how will we ever get there?  How long will it take?  What rocket designs might one day conquer the voids of space?  Faster Than Light! The Dream of Interstellar Flight will dazzle audiences with virtual rides aboard spacecraft of the future.  This is a 35-minute presentation. (The campus will be closed March 6 and March 8 for College Spring Break)  For more information, call (231) 777-0289.


Muskegon Museum of Art: Postcard Salon
February 1 – February 15

Don’t miss the “Postcard Salon” exhibition happening February 1 – 15 at the Muskegon Museum of Art!  Over 1,400 cards from artists from West Michigan and beyond were on display last year, offering a huge range of materials and subject matter to enjoy.  Now in its 12th year, the Postcard Salon reflects the Muskegon Museum of Art’s commitment to Michigan artists, a chance for people of all ages and skill levels to share their work with the public.

The exhibition is free to enter and all submitted cards are installed, making the show a true community endeavor.  The exhibition is also a great opportunity to support the area arts community by purchasing an original work of art.  Join them this year for the first ever juror awards, singling out four remarkable cards. Artwork must be delivered to the MMA by January 29, 2018.

Beginning at 7:00pm on Thursday, February 15, all of the postcards on display in the Wiener Gallery will be for sale at $30 apiece.  Don’t miss this opportunity to own an original artwork by your favorite regional artists.  Buyers will be able to take the works directly from the walls and pay for them at several locations throughout the museum.  Muskegon Museum of Art members will be given a five-minute head start beginning promptly at 6:55pm.  The sale ends at 8:00pm, so don’t miss out!  Memberships can be obtained in the Museum Gift Store, or in the gallery on the 15th.  For more information, call 231-720-2570.


The Best Italian Pasta Sauces with Sofia
Monday, February 5 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Monday, February 5 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm you’re invited to Kitchen 242 for the culinary class, “The Best Italian Pasta Sauces with Sofia!”  In this informative and fun class, Sofia will unveil the secrets of the authentic “al dente” pasta and sauce, then show you how to pair a variety of pasta shapes with their ideal sauces.  Instructor Sofia Occhialini moved here with her family from Italy four years ago. Sign up for classes at Eventbrite.com or call 231-769-2202 for more information.  The cost is $40.


Comedy Night at Fetch Brewing: Adam Degi
Tuesday, February 6 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm       

It’s Comedy Night with Adam Degi at Fetch Brewing Company! Fetch is located at 100 W. Colby St. in Whitehall. Adam isn’t just another straight white male comedian. He’s bald, and his talent and joke writing separates him from the pack. The opener is Matt Lauria and your MC for the night is Ricarlo Williams-Winston from Muskegon! For more information, call (231) 292-1048.


White Lake Classical Series: 4-Hand Piano
Tuesday, February 6 @ 7:00 pm    

You’re invited to the Book Nook & Java Shop at 8744 Ferry St. Montague, for another installment in the White Lake Classical Series featuring Steve Thielman and Bryan Uecker playing 4-hand piano and performing the music of Beethoven, Brahms, Satie and Cui. The cover charge is only $5. Come early at 6:15pm to enjoy a dinner of Chicken Parmesan with homemade marinara over linguine, broccoli, glass of house wine and double chocolate mocha Napoleon for only $17. Please RSVP for dinner by calling 231-894-5333.


Reception and Special Program – All Me: The Life and Times of Winfred Rembert
Thursday, February 8 @ 5:30 pm  

Come to the Muskegon Museum of Art located at 296 West Webster, downtown Muskegon for a reception and a special program, “All Me: The Life and Times of Winfred Rembert!” Winfred Rembert has a lot of stories to tell, from his childhood on a cotton farm to his near lynching during the Civil Rights movement. The reception begins at 5:30pm and the film (60 mins.) is at 7:00pm. Southern Roots: The Paintings of Winfred Rembert will be on display at the museum December 14, 2017 through March 18, 2018. For more information, call 231-720-2570.


Hearty Soups and Homemade Bread Bowls with Chef Char
Thursday, February 8 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm     

Thursday, February 8 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm, you’re invited to Kitchen 242 located at 242 W. Western Ave., downtown Muskegon for the culinary class, “Hearty Soups and Homemade Bread Bowls with Chef Char!” Warm Up with a hot bowl of homemade soup and a delicious pretzel-style bread bowl. Two soups will be made to try and take home, including loaded baked potato soup and creamy roasted tomato basil. Also learn the secrets to making a delicious bread bowl to serve your soup in. All culinary skill levels are welcome. Sign up for classes at Eventbrite.com or call 231-769-2202 for more information. The cost is $40.


James and the Giant Peach Jr.
Thursday, February 8 @ 7:00 pm – February 10 @ 9:00 pm        

Come to Mona Shores High School, 1121 W. Seminole Rd. for a delightfully offbeat adaptation of the classic Roald Dahl adventure, “James and the Giant Peach JR.” performed by the Mona Shores Middle School Allegrettos. It’s a fantastical tale of a boy, his insect friends, and their amazing journey across the ocean on a giant piece of fruit. Tickets are $10. Call 231-332-8540 or 616-309-4390.


Muskegon Museum of Art: Free Thursday Evening Tours
Thursdays @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Every Thursday from 4:00pm – 8:00pm, you’re invited to the Muskegon Museum of Art for a free tour guided by MMA docents, compliments of Meijer! Call 231-720-2570.


Bling Thing
Friday, February 9 – February 10  

This event is held at the Century Club Ballroom, 356 W. Western Ave. Bling Thing is a fundraiser event to benefit the Hackley Public Library! Friday, the 9th, it’s the early-sale party with wine and chocolate. A minimum $10 donation is requested. Saturday, the 10th, from 10:00am – 2:00pm is the public sale of items, free entry, coffee and hot chocolate provided by Biggby Coffee. Buy costume, vintage and fine jewelry as well as purses, scarves, jackets and other “bling!” For more information, visit www.fohpl.org .


Muskegon Lumberjacks Home Game
February 9 @ 7:00 pm – February 10 @ 7:00 pm       

The Muskegon Lumberjacks are proud and dedicated members of the United States Hockey League (USHL), the nation’s only Tier I junior hockey league and leading producer of NCAA players and National Hockey League draft picks in the United States, for five years running! Catch two home games, Friday, February 9 and Saturday the 10th at 7:15pm as the Jacks take on the Madison Capitols at the L.C. Walker Arena located at 955 Fourth St., downtown Muskegon. Purchase tickets by calling 231-724-5225.


The Alley Door Club: Swinging Stem Cells – Classic Rock
Friday, February 9 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm

Celebrating its’ 13th season, The Alley Door Club, upstairs at the Frauenthal Center, 425 W. Western Ave. with live performances from an array of local bands! Performing on select Friday nights through April, The Alley Door Club features live music from popular West Michigan bands in a fun environment which includes cash bar and dancing. Featured in the Ballroom located on the 3rd Floor of the Hilt Building the doors open at 6:00pm for Happy Hour ($1 off all drinks), with live music from 7:00pm – 10:00pm. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at the Frauenthal Box Office via phone at 231-727-8001 or in person Monday – Friday from 11:00am to 5:30pm or by calling Star Tickets at 1-800-585-3737.   Tickets can also be purchased at startickets.com. Tables may be reserved: $65.00 for a 4-top (included 4 admission tickets) / $100.00 for an 8-top (includes 8 admission tickets). Limit of 2 4-tops and 2 8-tops reserved for each performance, available on a first come basis. The Alley Door Club is sponsored by Bayer Crop Science and Hooker DeJonge.


West Michigan Symphony Presents: Hollywood’s Greatest Melodies
Friday, February 9 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm        

Come to the Frauenthal Center located at 425 W. Western Ave., downtown Muskegon as the West Michigan Symphony presents Hollywood’s Greatest Melodies! Scott Speck, conductor Guest Artists – Diane Penning, soprano Paul Langford, piano Join Diane, Pa Diane and Paul return to the WMS to sing a variety of titles from the American Film Institute’s list of “100 Best Songs from Movies” list. Titles include, Climb Every Mountain, Somewhere, The Way We Were, Moon River, and Love is an Open Door from the motion picture Frozen. For more information, call 231-726-3231.ul and the West Michigan Symphony and be transported through a series of treasured movie memories.


Learn to Luge Weekend
Friday – Sunday @ 6:00 pm

Every Friday – Sunday at 6:00pm (weather permitting), you can learn to luge at the Muskegon Winter Sports Complex, offering one of only four publicly accessible luge tracks in the United States! Although shorter in overall length than the Olympic tracks in New York and Salt Lake City, the Muskegon Luge track provides an Olympic thrill with the safety of the participant in mind. The track was designed by three-time Olympian Frank Masley and consists of six curves and two starting areas. For more information, call 1-877-TRY-LUGE or visit the website below to make reservations.

Safe & Easy to Learn

Safety is the number one priority when teaching new sliders or conducting races with seasoned sliders. All participants must be at least 8 years old at the time of their session. Participants are outfitted with elbow pads, a helmet and a well-maintained luge sled. An instructor carefully goes over each part of the sled with a beginning slider and teaches easy to learn methods of steering the sled. Over three decades, the program has instructed thousands of sliders from age 8 to 80 to safely and successfully luge. While luge is referred to the fastest sport on ice, this track is designed for the novice slider at slower speeds than an Olympic track, where sliders can reach speeds of 90+ mph. The top speeds at the Muskegon Winter Sports Complex track are approximately 30 mph on a “good ice” day although to most new sliders it still feels like 90 mph!

Get Some Physical Activity in the Winter

The sleds weigh between 25-40 lbs. and are transported up a flight of stairs to the top of the luge track by human power…you! Small children will most likely need adult help to get their sled back up the hill. If you have heart troubles or health issues that may be complicated by climbing stairs or participating in adrenaline pumping outdoor thrill sports, this activity may not be recommended.

What to Expect

The size of each session is limited, so participants can expect to get 3-6 runs depending on weather conditions and efficiency of the group and personal pace. The first 20 minutes of the session you will receive instruction from an experienced luge coach about safety and equipment. During free sliding time, coaches will be positioned along the track to give you instruction throughout the session. The last 15 minutes of each session is set aside for participant certificates and a medals ceremony.


Indoor Farmers’ Market
Saturday @ 9:00 am – 2:00 pm

The Muskegon Farmers’ Market invites you to come inside their warm barn and shop this winter! They’re open every Saturday from 9:00am – 2:00pm, November – April. They will be closed Saturday, December 30. For more information, call (231) 722-3251.


Postcards Super Saturday
Saturday, February 10 @ 10:00 am – 3:00 pm  

Come to the Muskegon Museum of Art located at 296 W. Western Ave., downtown Muskegon for a “Postcards Super Saturday” Free Family Fun Day! Postcard Salon is one of the most popular exhibitions and the artwork is small, but the creativity is limitless. Super Saturdays are Free Family Fun Days held on 2nd Saturdays of the Month.
•10:00 am & 1:00 pm Family Film
•11:00 am – 1:00 pm Guided Exhibition Tours – Find surprises in Postcard Salon, led with a Museum docent.
•11:00 am – 2:00 pm Make & Take – Create your own postcard-size art.

For more information, call 231-720-2570.


Kids Cooking: Homemade Chicken Pot Pies with Chef
Char
Saturday, February 10 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm

You’re invited to Kitchen 242 located at 242 W. Western Ave., downtown Muskegon for the culinary class, “Kids Cooking: Homemade Chicken Pot Pies with Chef Char!” In this class, the recipe and techniques for a flaky homemade butter crust will be produced, rolled out and filled with delicious assorted vegetables, roasted chicken and savory gravy to be assembled for a tiny meat pie with a big bold taste. Kids ages 7+ Sign up for classes at Eventbrite.com or call 231-769-2202 for more information. The cost is $35.


Sip & Shop
Saturday, February 10 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm  

Watermark 920, located at 930 Washington is proud to host their first Sip & Shop! They will have a variety of local vendors and crafters offering an array of goods from LulaRoe to handmade jewelry! Sip while you shop! A cash bar will be open for the event featuring Mimosas, Wine, Beer and mixed drinks. Non-Alcoholic beverages will also be available! Fatty Lumpkins will be on site serving their sandwiches as well.


Taste at the Lakes
Saturday, February 10 @ 12:00 pm – 9:00 pm 

Lakes Mall located at 5600 Harvey St. invites everyone for “Taste at the Lakes!” Taste craft beers and wines while enjoying their many entertainers throughout the mall. Proceeds will benefit the Muskegon Child Abuse Council. For more information, call (231) 798-7104.


3rd Annual Sweet Soul Food Dessert Contest
Saturday, February 10 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm    

Come to Hackley Public Library located at 316 W. Webster, downtown Muskegon for the 3rd annual Sweet Soul Food Dessert Contest! Get out your recipe files and get registered for a chance to win! Please bring enough to share. Judging will be by Executive Chef Megan Gorstecki with prizes awarded for 1st, 2nd and 3rd places as well as a People’s Choice award. Brought to the community through a generous bequest from Bess Commodore. WUVS 103.7 “The Community Station” the Beat is the media sponsor.


Walk / Skate for Warmth Fundraiser
Saturday, February 10 @ 3:30

L.C. Walker Arena located at 470 W. Western Ave. downtown Muskegon is hosting this event. 3:30 is registration and 4:00 pm is when the skate or walk begins. The walk is FREE. Skating is $5 plus rental. All skating proceeds will benefit Muskegon Oceana Community Action Partnership. All participants will receive a discounted ticket voucher for that evening’s Muskegon Lumberjack hockey game.


Valentine’s Day Cooking for Two with Chef Sofia
Saturday, February 10 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm   

You’re invited to Kitchen 242 for the culinary class, “Valentine’s Day Cooking for Two with Chef Sofia!” In this class, you’ll spend the night with your honey and learn some kitchen skills together along the way. A succulent and romantic hands-on menu includes appetizer, Prosecco Risotto, Martini Chicken with baked rosemary potatoes and chocolate mousse. Sign up for classes at Eventbrite.com or call 231-769-2202. The cost is $75 per couple.


Performances @The Block: Ian Maksin and Gabrielle Datcu – World Music
Saturday, February 10 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm  

Cellist Ian Maksin returns to The Block, located at 360 W. Western Ave. bringing guitarist Gabriel Datcu for a concert of jazz and world music. Maksin has gained international recognition for his beautiful tone, his own unique innovative style. Call 231-726-3231 x223 for tickets and more information. Doors and bar open at 6:45pm and the concert begins at 7:30pm


Local Author: Cookbook Release Party at Fetch
Sunday, February 11 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Come to Fetch Brewing Co. located at 100 W. Colby St. Whitehall as they celebrate Muskegon’s own entrepreneur Valerie Hanson and the release of her humorous and instructive new cookbook, “What Have We Learned!” Valerie is the owner and operator of Bygone Basics Cooking School and Bakery in Montague, where she also owns and operates Amanda’s Bequest Bed & Breakfast along with her husband, John. Their release party will feature a book signing and sampling of foods created by Valerie herself from her recipes! For more information, call (231) 292-1048. Muskegon is proud of you Val.


The Vietnam War: A Film by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick
Monday, February 12 @ 6:00 pm

Monday evenings at 6:00pm, January 29 – April 2, come to the USS Silversides Submarine Museum, located at 1346 Bluff St. for The Vietnam War by Ken Burns! Each episode will be followed by a discussion. Admission is free with the purchase of museum admission. Members are free. For more information, call 231-755-1230.


Visit our website
www.visitmuskegon.org
www.facebook.com/visitmuskegon
www.twitter.com/visitmuskegon

Pine Hill Cemetery: Preserving Its History

By Kimberly Slezak

pinehillFruitport Township’s Cemetery, The Pine Hill Cemetery, is located in section 36 at Brooks and Pontaluna Roads. Commonly referred to as “Fruitport Cemetery”, there are no legal records to support it ever being called that. We do know that much of Fruitport’s history can be told through the cemetery.

Originally a part of Norton Township until it separated and organized under the name of Lovell in 1867, Fruitport officially became its own township on March 31, 1871. Due to the lack of paper records, exact dates are unknown for many pieces of the cemetery’s history. It is known however that in its earliest years, land for the cemetery was deeded to the township by Thomas and Ellen Smalley, Edward and Julia Craw, and Jesse H. Cooley.

Township records do not exist, but it is said that a potter’s field, for those residents who had no means for a proper burial, was located in the area of Bridge Street and Brooks Road. It has also been said that a Native American burial ground was located near the cemetery as well. Native American artifacts have been found in the area over the years, suggesting a burial ground.

The exact date of the first burial in the cemetery is unrecorded, but the oldest legible headstone dates back to 1877.

There are six known Civil War Veterans buried in Pine Hill Cemetery. These include Augustus Converse, Henry C. Barnes, Silas H. Hendryx, Moses Bigelow, Levi Bigelow, and Daniel Blackmer. These particular headstones are marked with the bronze star of the Grand Army of the Republic (GAR). The GAR was a fraternal organization for Civil War Veterans, specifically of the Union Army, organized in 1866. The organization became extinct in 1956 when its last member died.

ford

Harry Ford, Joseph C. Ford, Joseph Jr. Ford

One of Fruitport’s most notable residents, Joseph C. Ford, is also buried at Pine Hill. The Ford family headstone is one of the largest to be found in the cemetery. Joseph was Superintendent of Spring Lake Iron Co. and also served as Fruitport Township Supervisor for a period. He and his family made their home at what is now The Village Park Bed and Breakfast located across the street from the present Pomona Park. The Fords had nine children, one of which died as an infant. Their youngest child, Harry, drowned in Spring Lake in 1902, in front of the Pavillion dance hall during its first year in operation. Joseph, his wife Alice, Harry, and their infant child are buried at Pine Hill.

In 1960 the mausoleum was built at Pine Hill and its first internment was in 1961. A small section of land located adjacent to the mausoleum was set aside specifically for babies and infants. Commonly referred to as “Baby Land”, the first burial in this location was Baby Akins in 1963.

The George Forsberg Memorial Chapel was added in 1973. Due to the lack of use, it is now part of the garage and storage for the cemetery.

Pine Hill and its interred residents have a great amount of history waiting to be shared. In an effort to save accurate information for future generations, The Fruitport Historical Society is seeking family biographies for those buried at Pine Hill. If you have any information that you would like to share, please contact the Fruitport Historical Society at fruitporthistory@gmail.com, or through our Facebook page. Information can also be dropped off at the Fruitport District Library.

To date, members of the Fruitport Historical Society have photographed and cataloged each and every headstone in the Pine Hill Cemetery. All of this can be found on the Pine Hill link of the Muskegon County Genealogical Society web page at www.genealogymuskegon.com. The society would eventually like to add any biographies that can be obtained.

The “cemetery project” team of the Fruitport Historical Society would like to thank the present caretaker, Jerry Darga, for his excellent job maintaining our beautiful cemetery. His hard work and pride shows and is greatly appreciated!

Solar Electric Investment Analysis Webinar Series

Webinar series assists participants to properly evaluate solar power proposals
by M. Charles Gould, Michigan State University Extension

Photovoltaic (PV) panels are an increasingly common sight on urban rooftops and rural properties across the U.S. The declining cost of equipment and installation makes installing a behind-the-electric-meter (net metered) solar electric system enticing for consumers. Evaluating the financial prudence of an investment in solar requires careful consideration of installation costs, the value of production, and operation and maintenance costs.

Michigan State University Extension is offering a six part webinar series entitled Agricultural Solar Electric Investment Analysis Webinar starting Thursday, January 18. It is important to note that even though the webinars are geared to an agricultural audience, the information that will be shared applies to anyone looking for information on making a wise solar energy investment.

This six part webinar series will provide practical guidance to anyone considering investing in a solar electric system so they are able to make fully informed investment decisions. Each session is 60 minutes long followed by 10-15 minutes of questions and answers. Participants will be given access to every webinar presentation as well as other information pertinent to the specific webinar topic. Participants will also be able to go back and view any webinars they missed.

The webinar series features two solar power experts, Eric Romich with Ohio State University Extension and John Hay with the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension, and is based on the six bulletins in the Solar Electric Investment Analysis Bulletin Series. Over the six sessions Romich and Hay will help webinar participants take a critical look at the investment required for a solar electric system. Registration information and a complete schedule can be found at https://events.anr.msu.edu/SolarAnalysisWebinar/.

If you have questions about the webinar series, or would like more information on energy efficiency practices or renewable energy projects, feel free to contact Charles Gould at 616-994-4547 or gouldm@msu.edu or Al Go at 517-353-0643 or goaluel@egr.msu.edu.