Monthly Archives: October 2016

Ask Dr. Universe – Cheetahs

Why do cheetahs run fast? –Shanyu, 9, London, UK

Dear Shanyu,

Cheetahs are in really good shape. Not only are they good runners, but the actual shape of their body helps them move at incredible speeds.

As the fastest cats on the planet, they can reach 75 mph. Whenever I lace up my shoes and run, I can only reach about 30 mph. Us tabby cats are pretty quick, but not quick enough to outrun a cheetah.

The difference has to do with a cheetah’s amazing anatomy—everything from its head and skeleton to its muscles and feet.

That’s what I found out from my friend Bethany Richards. She studies veterinary medicine here at Washington State University and is president of the Zoo, Exotics and Wildlife Club.

“Cheetahs are so lean and just cool,” she said, recalling a recent safari in Africa, where she saw them running around.

She explained that a cheetah’s spine is very flexible. It’s more flexible than other cat spines. The spine is so flexible that it allows the cheetah to quickly move its two back feet ahead of its two front feet. Along with some unique hips, this movement helps the cheetah get more distance per stride.

This allows the cheetah to take four long strides each second. In fact, if you slow down video of a sprinting cheetah you see it spends more time in the air than on the ground.

A cheetah also has strong muscles to help the spine move. They are made of special fibers that are ideal for sprinting short distances. Their small skulls and narrow bodies keep the big cats aerodynamic as they zip through the air. They also use their big nostrils and big lungs to breathe as they run.

Richards explained that another important tool that cheetahs use for speed is their claws. Unlike the rest of us cats, cheetahs can’t retract their claws into their paws. This lets their paws work more like cleats. They can dig into the ground and not have to worry about swerving out of control at high speeds.

Cheetah populations are actually pretty small. They are an endangered species—they are at risk of extinction—and the mothers don’t have too many cubs. They need their speed to survive, Richards explained.

“It made sense that the fastest cats would be able to get to the best food to provide for their limited number of young,” she adds.

Of course, speed can be very useful when looking for dinner. But once the cheetahs catch their prey, they have to rest before eating. Scientists have also found that a cheetah’s agility—its ability to turn quickly and sharply while running—may be just as important to the hunt as speed. Put the two remarkable abilities together and you’ve got one cool cat.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Ask Dr. Universe is a science-education project from Washington State University. Send your science question to Dr. Universe at AskDrUniverse.wsu.edu.

Ask Dr. Universe – Cheese

What is cheese exactly? –Mark, 11

Dear friends,

Cheese is delicious. At least, that’s this cat’s professional opinion. For the more scientific answer, I visited the cheese makers here at Washington State University.

Cheese is the fat and protein from milk, said my friend John Haugen who runs the WSU Creamery where they make Cougar Gold Cheese.

At the creamery, students test milk from the dairy to make sure its fat and protein ratio is just right for cheese. They also heat up the milk to get rid of any bad bacteria—it’s a process called pasteurization. Not all bacteria are bad, though. In fact, some bacteria are really helpful for making foods, including yogurt, pickles, and cheese.

All cheese is made with a kind of lactic acid bacteria. These tiny little organisms are so small you would need to use a microscope to see them. They eat the sugar in the milk and make acid. The acid gives the cheese its tangy flavor.

There are even certain kinds of bacteria that are in charge of making the holes in Swiss cheese.

As Haugen explained how they add bacteria into the milk, I wondered how the liquid mix becomes a solid.

Haugen said that we need an enzyme, a protein that has a very special job to do. In cheese, enzymes work on protein in milk to break the bonds that keep it together. The protein opens up and sticks to other proteins around it to create a solid. If the enzyme does its job, the liquid will thicken, or coagulate.

“It’s almost looks like thick yogurt,” he said.

After that, the cheese makers will cut up the coagulated milk. When it starts looking a bit like cottage cheese, a machine pumps the mix onto a metal table.

This mix is partly made up of whey, which is mostly water. The other part of the mix is the soft, fresh curds. You can eat the cheese curds. They are tasty. Trust me. But they aren’t quite officially cheese yet.

First, the student cheese makers will pack the curds together into big loaves. They will flip the loaves over several times in a process called “cheddaring.”

If you wanted your cheese to be stringier, softer, crumblier, or harder, you might treat it a little differently. But at the creamery, Cougar Gold gets cheddared, chopped up, and salted to kill off some of the remaining bacteria and to keep it from liquefying.

The cheddaring process is actually named after the place where cheddar was first invented—Cheddar Gorge in England.

During the 12th century, people kept their cheese in caves. The temperature and humidity was just right for storing cheese.

At the WSU Creamery, cheese is also stored at just the right temperature, but inside tin cans.

“It’s almost like its own little cheese cave,” said Haugen. The cheese will stay in the can one full year before we eat it. Aging the cheese helps bring out the flavors.

After my visit to the creamery, I learned cheese is not just delicious. It’s milk, bacteria, enzymes, and salt. It’s science.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

ISM Greater Grand Rapids – Affiliate Dinner Meeting

Tuesday, November 8, 2016

Affiliate Dinner Meeting
GRAND RAPIDS MICHIGAN – ISM the Greater Grand Rapids Affiliate is pleased to announce their affiliate dinner meeting on Tuesday, November 8, 2016 at the GVSU University Club, 401 West Fulton Street in Grand Rapids. Dr. Steven A Melnyk, Michigan State University, will present “The Emergence of the Supply Chain Leader.” The deadline for registration is Wednesday, November 2nd at Noon. Reservations can be made online by email at ISMGGR@aol.com or by credit card at www.ismggr.org. The non-member cost for the dinner meeting is $35.00; full-time students is $12.00.

Editorial: FHS School Millage

Destroy a school – to build a new school?

Fruitport’s CAP Scores

Controlling for differences in the socioeconomic status of the students each school served provides a more accurate assessment of a school’s performance, since research has shown that student backgrounds can have a large impact on academic performance. The Michigan Context and Performance Report Card (CAP) measures school performance by adjusting standardized test scores to account for student background – the “context” of a school.

The CAP score for schools in Michigan put out by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy has Fruitport rated 456 out of 659 (almost a grade D). There are other measurements that rate Fruitport about average. Fruitport obviously has problems educating our kids.

The only school in this area with a lower CAP rating than Fruitport is Muskegon Heights and they have a much newer high school. North Muskegon is rated at 77 (almost a grade A) with the oldest buildings.

Fruitport’s problem is not the age of the buildings. They are made of cement and steel which can last a thousand years, and they have been continuously updated with past bonds and millages.

The problem is not the income for the school system because Fruitport has the Mall development area which gives us extra money without any extra kids, a financial advantage most school districts don’t have.

The problem is not the teachers.

The problem is not the parents.

What does that leave?

The problem is the management.

The management (Superintendent and school board) keeps pushing one ill-advised millage after another, instead of addressing the issue of how to better educate our children.

Voting for the millage will also make it more difficult for new development in the Mall area to come, which is the real financial benefit Fruitport has had. One of the reasons the Mall was built in Fruitport to begin with, was because of our reasonable taxes. Now we are being asked to do away with that tax advantage, with no promise of better educating our children.

Voting for this millage is not likely to give our children a better education, and will unnecessarily increase our taxes which won’t help anything or anyone!

Trump or not?

Whether we like it or not, America is drowning and the Trump boat, though less than desirable, is the only viable option for rescue we have to keep us afloat for the time being.

If we do not vote for Trump and therefore vote for Hillary, we will have lost our right to complain about the escalating murders of third trimester, unborn lives in America and increasing the span of Parental Rights, because we had our chance to do something and we did nothing.

If we do not vote for Trump and therefore vote for Hillary, we will have lost your right to complain about future liberal Supreme Court Rulings, because we had our chance to do something and we did nothing.

If we do not vote for Trump and therefore vote for Hillary, we will have lost our right to complain when our pastors are imprisoned for hate speech crimes, because we had our chance to do something and we did nothing.

If we do not vote for Trump and therefore vote for Hillary, we will have lost our right to complain when we lose our right to bear arms and fret over the safety of our families, because we had the chance to do something and we did nothing.

I am not arguing that Trump is a great man.

I am not even arguing that Trump is a good man.

I am arguing that in the words of Christ Himself, God can use an individual that is “not one of us” to further His purposes and protect His people.

I am arguing that in this time, and in this particular circumstance as the only nominee for the Republican Party, Trump is the RIGHT man to serve as President of the United States.

Excerpt from an article written by a highly educated, staunchly theologically and politically conservative Pastors’s wife.

P.S. Please take the time to check out the wisdom of Wayne Grudem, renown theologian and his thoughts on “Why Voting For Trump Is A Morally Good Choice.” Luke 9:49-50, NIV; 1 Timothy 2:1-4, NIV

Candidate Bio: Max Riekse

Candidate for State Rep 91st District

max-riekse> Lt. Colonel Max Riekse; U.S. Army Retired; 32 years; Vietnam War and Iraq War Veteran; Michigan K-12 Public Schools Retiree; 23 years.
> Fruitport Public Schools K-12; graduated 1965
> Rated (A) twice by the NRA – National Rifle Association – for his strong support of our Second Amendment Individual Rights. Max is a Life Member of the NRA & has been a member since 1964
> Endorsed by Right to Life of Michigan – PAC – June 2014
> Past Commander of Fruitport VFW Post for many years
> Former Board Member of Fruitport Township Parks Commission; elected to 2 terms.

Max has one son who attends Fruitport Public Schools; both are involved in Fruitport Boy Scouts.
• Max does not support Common Core;
• End the legislative war against Public Schools; public school Teachers; and Retirees. Max has absolutely no use for the liberal MEA
• Max will work to eliminate property taxes on homes of seniors 70 & over.
• Eliminate the tax on senior pensions that Holly Hughes voted for
• Marriage is between a man & woman; that is Biblical going back thousands of years
• Revoke all unconstitutional Michigan asset forfeiture laws which go against 4th Amendment due process
• No more tax dollars to Detroit; after years of bad government, Detroit needs to get its act together without our money
• Max strongly supports Donald Trump because he will end unfair trade deals like NAFTA which has cost hard working Americans millions of dollars

Candidate Bio: Marjorie Stonecypher

Candidate for Fruitport School Board

marjorie-stonecypherI am the Treasurer/Clerk for the Village of Fruitport. I am currently a student at Baker College working on a Business Degree. I am taking the Muskegon in Focus Leadership program through The Muskegon Lakeshore Chamber of Commerce. I am a mother. We live in the Fruitport Township and our family runs the Red Rose Farm.

I am passionate about Children, Education, and the Fruitport Community. I have a unique perspective due to my position as the Treasurer Clerk of the Village enabling me to act as an effective link to other Fruitport and Muskegon County government.

Some of the issues facing schools today are shrinking budgets, education requirements, test scores, class sizes, buildings, staff, etc. I plan on handling these issues by defining the challenges, prioritizing them based on our ability to make improvements to them,

I would like to collaborate with as many agencies and residents as possible to do what is best for the children and our community. This is not about what is best for me, it is what is best for Fruitport.

My top five objectives are:
• Attracting and retaining the best teachers
• Education
• Improve test scores
• Cutting class size
• Improving Buildings

Candidate Bio: Mark Grant

Candidate for Muskegon County Drain Commissioner

Mark Grant:
• 53 year old Life long resident and US Navy Vet.
• With 27 years experience at Heating and Air Conditioning repair
• Served as President of MI ACCA and West MI ACCA and sits on Board for Michigan Irish Music Fest.
• Knows how to listen to people and lead and Fix things, deal with engineers and contracts.
• Willing to Serve the Constituents of Muskegon County with integrity and transparency.
• Will protect property rights,Protect your money and keep your agenda not my own.
• Vote for Mark Grant for Drain Commissioner for Muskegon

Candidate Bio: Bill Stone

Candidate for Fruitport Village Council

I am running for another term on the Village Council because I love Fruitport. I am married to Rose, and have 4 adult children. I am a 1980 graduate of FHS, and have lived here most of my life. I graduated from GVSU with degrees in History, Political Science, and Education. I am starting my 18th year as a teacher, most of which was spent teaching Government, Economics, and History with Shelby Public Schools. I am now at the Muskegon Area Career Tech Center and I love it. What a great opportunity for the students of FHS and Muskegon County. In my short time on the FV Council, I have witnessed many changes. I believe there are many still to come. We have a wonderful opportunity with the waterfront and the park, and need to take advantage of and improve this asset to the Village. Additionally, the residents need somewhere to go where they can get their questions answered well and factually. We need honest answers in real time. Too many people have heard “I will need to check on that and get back to you,” only to never be contacted again. Transparency is vitally important when working with the residents of the Village of Fruitport. Thank you.

Zika Spreads in USA; Planned Parenthood Stalls Vaccine Bill

The dangerous Zika virus strikes across the United States and her territories, but Planned Parenthood encourages a pro-abortion faction in the Senate to filibuster a bill providing $1.1 billion in emergency funding for vaccine development because they believe that the bill should provide money to Planned Parenthood as well.

The Zika virus is an infectious disease spread by mosquitoes as well as by sexual contact. Symptoms may last up to a week in a victim, or they may not be exhibited at all. But for an unborn child, the effects can be deformity and death. According to the CDC, as of October 19, 2016, findings indicate that 4,016 cases of Zika have been reported in the US and Washington DC, as well as over 27,000 cases throughout US Territories. These figures include nearly 2,000 pregnant women who have shown lab evidence of infection.

While Planned Parenthood has no experience in vaccine development, or in control of the disease’s mosquito vector, the organization still demands that funds be allocated for its services or it will continue to stall the bill’s progress. According to Barbara Listing, President of Right to Life of Michigan, in an October 2016 newsletter, accusations have been made that the vaccine bill would be used to defund Planned Parenthood. However, the bill will not take funds from Planned Parenthood in the least way. Also, pro-abortion Senator, Harry Reid, claims that Planned Parenthood must have a stake in the bill in order to “protect women and babies”, prompting some to ask, “Really?” The fact remains that Planned Parenthood currently receives $1.5 million in Federal funding per day, while asking that the proposed bill send additional taxpayer money to their organization, which provides more abortion services than any other organization on earth.

The spread of the Zika virus is a public health emergency, and has nothing to do with funding Planned Parenthood. Right to Life of Michigan believes exposing Planned Parenthood’s insidious agenda should be one of the top priorities of the pro-life movement. Americans can further the protection of life by retiring pro-abortion elected officials who want to use taxpayer dollars to fund abortion, and by supporting legislation to protect women and their unborn children. Taxpayers should not allow Planned Parenthood to continue to hold Congress hostage while the Zika virus emerges throughout the United States and her Territories.

Visit www.RTL.org to learn more about Planned Parenthood and its life-threatening game of blackmail against the American people. “Thank you and God bless you for your support and for your prayers,” says Listing, “Get ready to cast your vote for life on November 8.”

For more information, see the CDC’s website with information on the spread of the Zika virus.
www.cdc.gov/zika/geo/united-states.html
www.cdc.gov/zika/index.html

Contact your representatives at:
Senate:
Gary C. Peters – (D – MI)
724 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-6221
Contact: www.peters.senate.gov/contact/email-gary

Debbie Stabenow – (D – MI)
731 Hart Senate Office Building Washington DC 20510
(202) 224-4822
Contact: www.stabenow.senate.gov/?p=contact

Congress, 2nd District:
Bill Huizenga
Republican
1217 Longworth HOB
Washington, D.C. 20515
Phone: (202) 225-4401

Other Representatives: https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/MI

A Trail of Michigan Authors 2016

Barnes & Noble will be hosting it’s annual Trail of Michigan Authors on Friday, October 28th from 6 PM to 9 PM.

This is one of the top events in Michigan for the number and the quality of authors in attendance.  The gathering includes 40 Michigan authors from all over the state.  Many authors are best sellers and have won top awards for their books.

The featured authors include Laurie Keller, Margaret Willey, Amy Young, Aaron Zenz, and H. William Ruback.  Also returning for the second year are: Christine Byron, Deanna Compton, C.J. Coombes, Kelli Czuchna, Kari de St. Germain, Jennifer Fisch-Ferguson, Melissa Keir, David Kolb, Elisa Koopmans, Steve LeBel, Bob Lenz, Mark Love, Mary Mathews, Tricia McDonald, J. Michael McFadden, J. Scott Payne, Kristi Porter, Ingar Rudholm, Jeffrey Schoenherr, Melanie Hooyenga, and Peter Welmerink.  And attending this event for the first time: Amy Bowling. Cassandra Crull. Vincent Egolf. Bob Hartson, Lon Hieftje, Amy Johnson, Cyrus Keith, Roberta King, Tom Laughlin, Norma Lewis, Patricia Lewis, Patricia Miller, Anthony Mondal, Diane Plopa, Kittye Sharron, Andrew Smith, Ken Welsch, Tnae Wilcox, and Linda Williams

The genres include everything from young adult, mystery, fantasy, science fiction, historical fiction, suspense, inspirational, and more.  Everyone is sure to find something they like.

Barnes & Noble is donating a percent of the revenues to the Friends of Hackley Library.

This is a great chance to get a head start on your holiday shopping by getting books signed by the authors who wrote them.

This is the Second Annual Trail of Michigan Authors Event.

Barnes & Noble Booksellers is located at 5275 Harvey Street, Muskegon, MI 49444.

Many authors at this event offer a chance to win free copies of their books.

Michigan Authors exists to promote Michigan authors and their work through book signing events, publishing opportunities, networking, and idea and resource sharing, The organization also hosts and promotes events featuring local authors at various locations.

Agents of Change Business After Hours

Business After Hours – Agents of Change
MEET THIS YEAR’S AGENTS OF CHANGE:

Hoby Thrasher – Bear Lake Tavern
Jason & RandiLynn Talsma – Blended Furniture Market
Allen Serio – Burning Foot Beer Festival
Ellen Berends – First Fridays
John Severson & Megan Byard – Muskegon Promise
Erin Kuhn – Port Day
John & Barb Hermanson – Sails Ablaze
Toni Seyferth – Muskegon STAR! Student Program

Agents of Change are community members or organizations that have made a positive impact on the greater Muskegon Lakeshore community through their leadership and action.

To rsvp go to our Facebook page. https://www.facebook.com/events/1114732535273574/

Register now. https://muskegonmicoc.wliinc16.com/events/Agents-of-Change-Business-After-Hours-6001/register

Event Details:
Thursday, November 03, 2016 5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Bella Maria’s Ristorante & Event Center
513 West Pontaluna Road
Muskegon, MI 49444

$5 donation at door

Event Partner:
WGVU Public Media

Event Host:
Bella Maria’s Ristorante & Event Center

Event Sponsor:
Consumers Energy

Fruitport Township Residents – Library Information

On November 19, 2016 the MADL will no longer staff the Fruitport Library. We will continue to see the inventory decrease at the Fruitport Library until that date.

Your current yellow MADL library card will be good to use at any MADL member libraries until December 31, 2016.

Your MADL card will be good until December 31, 2016.

Fruitport will join the Lakeland Library Cooperative giving us the circulation of books our residents currently have. Our residents will be able to use any library that has a membership with Lakeland Library Cooperative.

Until December 31st you can still continue to place books on hold as is your current practice using your MADL card. After that date you can continue to do that with your new library card.

The Fruitport Library will need to hire new staff.

The Fruitport Library plans to continue programs in the same manner our residents now experience them.

We are working with Spring Lake District Library to ensure our residents have library service should the Fruitport Library be unable to open January 1, 2017.

All books on hold will go to the Norton Shores Branch Library from November 19th until December 31, 2016.

The Fruitport Library drop box will not be accepting return books as of November 19th. Books should be returned to other MADL member libraries.

Contact the Library Committee for additional information:
Rose Dillon
231 865-3151
rdillon@fruitporttownship.com

Donna Pope
231 366-6030
d.irlenepope25@gmail

Muskegon County Calendar of Events 10/24/16-10/31/16

Presented by the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau

Obituary Tour
October 25 – October 26
Special evening tours of the Hackley & Hume Historic Site, the homes of Muskegon’s most well-known lumber barons, will include information from the obituaries and funerals of some of the family members who died in the houses.  Autopsies conducted during the early 1900s will also be addressed. Admission is $10 for Museum members and $15 for non-members.

Tour Dates:
Tuesday, October 25 – 7:00-8:00pm and 8:30 to 9:30pm
Wednesday, October 26 – 7:00 – 8:00pm and 8:30 to 9:30pm
For more information, call 231-722-7578.

Cocktails & Canvas
October 25 @ 6:00 pm
| $30
Tuesday, October 25 at 6:00pm, enjoy drinks at Pub One Eleven while you paint your own piece of art at Cocktails and Canvas!  The cost is $30 per person and will cover all of your art supplies.  You can pay by cash or Check the night of the event.  Call the Nuveen Center at 231-894-2787 for more information.

We Are Stars
Tuesdays & Thursdays 7:00 pm
There’s a new show at the Carr-Fles Planetarium!  “We Are Stars” is a 35-minute, family-friendly adventure that that spans the billions of years between the Big Bang and modern day, and follows the thread that connects us all to those early times through the atoms from which our bodies are formed.  Where did they come from?  How did they get here?  And is it true that we really are all made of stars?  The science content is most appropriate for ages 11 and up; however, the entrancing animation and award-winning soundtrack will draw all ages into the magical universe created within this incredible show.  No reservations are needed for this FREE program, which runs August 23 – October 27 on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:00pm (doors open by 6:45), and includes a brief demonstration of the current night sky.  The planetarium is in room 135 of Muskegon Community College (221 S. Quarterline Rd, Muskegon).  For more information, or to schedule a private show for groups of 15-44, please call (231) 777-0289 or email tamera.owens@muskegoncc.edu.

Sugar Skull Decorating
October 26 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
| $3 – $5
Muskegon Center for the Arts presents sugar skull decorating in conjunction with our of Dias de Los Muertos art exhibit. Four different designs in 2 sizes will be available for purchase. Royal frosting & sequins will be provided, along with examples and a brief history. Participants may bring other embellishments.

AhFest: Films Inspired by Dennis Lehane
October 26 @ 6:00 pm
Sit back, relax and enjoy a free movie and popcorn during AhFest!  “Mystic River,” “Gone Baby Gone,” “Shutter Island” and “The Drop” will be shown during the Muskegon Area Arts and Humanities Festival throughout October.  All four movies are based on novels by Dennis Lehane, whose lecture will close the festival on Thursday, October 27.  All movies will be shown at 6:00pm on Wednesdays at the Muskegon Museum of Art.  Beer and wine will be available at a cash bar.

Here’s the schedule:
Oct. 5: “Mystic River” (2003)
Oct. 12: “Gone Baby Gone” (2008)
Oct. 19: “Shutter Island” (2010)
Oct. 26: “The Drop” (2014)

Project 22
October 27
October 27, come to the USS Silversides Submarine Museum for a free viewing of the documentary, “Project 22.”  In the United States alone, twenty-two veterans commit suicide every day.  In Project 22, two combat-wounded veterans go on a mission to search for hope.  They find it EVERYWHERE!  Join the Muskegon County Department of Veterans Affairs for the movie at 12:00pm, 3:00pm or 6:00pm, followed by discussions and presentations.  Food and beverages will be available to purchase.  There is no charge to attend this event, but you are asked to please bring toiletries as a donation to the Veterans Food Bank.  Reserve your seat at www.project22muskegon.eventbrite.com.

Little Goblins Boo Bash
October 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
The 3rd annual Little Goblins Boo Bash at Watermark 920 is October 27 from 6:00pm-7:30pm. Bring the little ones for this ultimate dance party. Show off their costumes and let them dance the night away. Just $5 each (2 years and younger are FREE) gets you in with activities, costume parade, snacks, dancing and more! New this year is a cookie decorating station by the Coffee Factory!

Dennis LeHane, Live!
October 27 @ 7:00 pm
October 27 at 7:00pm, come to the Frauenthal Theater for Dennis LeHane, Live!, presented by Muskegon Writer’s Series.  Dennis LeHane is an award winning writer, producer and screenwriter.  His works include novels, “Gone, Baby, Gone,” “Shutter Island” and “Mystic River,” which have been adapted into award winning films.  There will be a Q & A and book signing following the show.  There will also be live music in the Frauenthal Theater Lobby from 6:00-7:00pm and a cash bar.  Tickets are $20  or $12 with student ID.  For tickets or more information, call 231-727-8001.

First Edition Jazz Band
October 27 @ 7:00 pm
Thursday, October 27 at 7:00pm, come to the Book Nook & Java Shop for live jazz from the First Edition band!  For more information, call 231-894-5333.

Haunted Hall
October 28 & 29
Haunted Hall, one of the county’s oldest haunted attractions, is back in 2016, and this year it’s designed to be bigger and better than ever. The attraction, which debuted in 1999, will take place at the Muskegon County Fairgrounds, 6621 Heights Ravenna Rd. in Fruitport Township, Fridays and Saturdays, October 1-29. This year’s theme is “The Quarantine Zone” and features three haunts for the price of one; The Foundry, The Bunker and The Containment Zone!  Enter all three haunts for only $15.00. Tickets can be purchased at the door with cash or credit card. Save $1.00 for every canned good you donate to Love, Inc. at the ticket office. Maximum of $3.00 off per ticket. This attraction is NOT recommended for children under 12 years of age or the faint of heart.   For more information, visit www.hauntedhall.com.

October Ghost Story Series: Speaking of Spirits
October 28 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
October 21 from 5:00-6:00pm, come to the Red Lotus Gallery “October Ghost Story Series: Speaking of Spirits!” Admission is free and refreshments are provided. Parental discretion is advised. Hear some chilling stories of the dead with this collaboration of true stories and first person encounters. Participants are encouraged to share their own first person encounters after the readings.

On Friday, October 28 from 5:00-6:00pm, it’s “True Irish Ghost Stories” by St. John D. Seymour (St. John Drelincourt). Take a trip back in time with the tales of peculiar events that take place in the 1800’s to early 1900’s. Participants are encouraged to tell old family or cultural ghost stories after the readings.

If you would like to RSVP or have questions email Sabryna at sabrynasnaturalcreations@hotmail.com.

A Trail of Michigan Authors
October 28 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Friday, October 28 from 6:00pm-9:00pm, come to Barnes and Noble Book Sellers for the 2nd Annual Trail of Michigan Authors, in support of Friends of Hackley Library.  Over 40 Michigan authors will be on hand to discuss and sign the best of their work.  Come and meet them all!  For more information, call  (231) 798-4388.

Haunted Trail – Heritage Park
October 28 @ 7:00 pm – October 29 @ 10:00 pm
| $15
October 28 & 29 from 7:00-10:00pm, it’s a night of Haunted History at Michigan’s Heritage Park in Whitehall!  They’ve dug up some ghosts and ghouls who are eager to meet you.  Participants will want to watch their backs as they take a walk through time’s most terrifying and bloody moments in history complete with ghost stories and surprises.  The tour is recommended for ages 13 and older.  The cost of the event is $15.

Live Music: Green on Blue
October 28 @ 7:00 pm
Friday, October 28 at 7:00pm, come to the Book Nook & Java Shop for live music from Green on Blue!  For more information, call 231-894-5333.

Muskegon Lumberjacks Home Games
October 28 & 29 @ 7:15 pm
Friday, October 28 and Saturday, October 29 at 7:15pm, come to the L.C. Walker Arena as the Muskegon Lumberjacks take on the Sioux Falls Stampede!  The Muskegon Lumberjacks are proud members of the United States Hockey League, the nations only Tier I junior hockey league and the leading producer of NCAA players and National Hockey League draft picks in the United States. The Lumberjacks’organization prides itself on developing not just premier hockey talent, but also exceptional young men outside the arena of sports. For more information, visit www.muskegonlumberjacks.com.

Performances @The Block: Rodney Whitaker Quartet
October 28 @ 7:30 pm
Tickets: $20-$30, $10 Student tickets with ID
Internationally renowned bassist and Mack Avenue recording artist, Rodney Whitaker and his band present an evening of swinging jazz favorites Friday, October 28 at 7:30pm.  Rodney is one of the hardest working swinging bass players on the scene and has recorded with great musicians such as Roy Hargrove, Pat Methany and Wynton Marsalis.  With one of the most undeniably distinctive “bear- sized” bass tones, Rodney Whitaker is considered to be one of the leading bass performers and teachers of the jazz double bass in the United States.

Call Rita at 231-726-3231 x223 for tickets and more information. Doors and bar open at 6:45pm, concert begins at 7:30pm.

Paranormal Activity Investigation Aboard the USS Silversides
October 28 @ 8:00 pm
Are you a believer?  Evidence of the paranormal has been documented on the USS Silversides Submarine, USCGC McLane and the USS Silversides Submarine Museum, said Mark Briones, co-founder of Marter Paranormal.

It took years for Briones to believe in the supernatural and paranormal.  He founded the investigative company about five years ago, after beginning research about eight years ago.  The Marter team will conduct a paranormal investigation on the Muskegon submarine, USCGC McLane and the adjacent museum October 28 and you are invited!  “I can almost guarantee you we’ll have some kind of occurrence,” Briones said.

He and many other paranormal researchers have already collected electronic voice phenomenon (EVP) and thermal images, and seen movement on the ships and in the museum during an investigation over the summer.

The search for paranormal activity will be held from 8:00pm-9:00am.  There is a limit of 20 people.  Tickets are $50 each.  Participants must be 18 or older.  During the event, Marter will host an investigation and conduct experiments. Attendees may bring handheld equipment to investigate on their own.

Free Tours of the Hackley & Hume Site for Muskegon County Residents
October 29 & 30
Tours of the homes of Muskegon’s most well-known lumber barons are free for Muskegon County residents on weekends during the month of October.  Saturday hours are 10:00am-4:00pm, Sunday hours are 1:00-4:00pm.  For more information, call 231-722-7578.

Michigan’s Edge Challenge MTB XC Race
October 29
| $30 – $35
The Michigan’s Edge Challenge Cross Country Race supporting the MEMBA is back for the second year.  This unique event features one of the best mountain bike courses in the state.  A 13.1 mile trail that crosses rivers, and offers racers some great views is only open for limited parts of the season.  Don’t miss out on your chance to be part of this great event!

Race Format:

Awards/Medals will be given to the top 3 overall in each category for both Men and Women.  The top 3 will be removed from the Age group awards and medals for top 3 per ager group.

1 lap race categories: 10am Start.
Beginner/Sport (19 and under, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60+ male and female age groups)
Clydesdale (Open Age Group)
FatBike (34 and under, 35+ male age groups)
2 Lap race categories: 11am Start
Expert/Elite (34 and under, 35+ male and female age groups)
SingleSpeed (Open Age Groups)

Depot to Depot Fall Color Tour
October 29 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Gather your family and friends to experience the vibrant Fall colors at the Depot-to-Depot Fall Color Tour! This free self-guided tour happens October 8, 15, 22 and 29 from 10:00am – 4:00pm. “Color Tourers” can pick up a map at either the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau located in the historic Union Depot at 610 W. Western Ave. in downtown Muskegon or at the White Lake Area Chamber/CVB at the Whitehall Depot 124 W. Hanson St. in downtown Whitehall. Using the map as a guide you’ll have the opportunity to visit stops along the way to win great prizes! Refreshments will be served at both the Muskegon and Whitehall Depots and kids will receive a free pumpkin that they can decorate on-the-spot. For more information call 231-724-3100.

Impromptu Fall Harvest for Kids
October 29 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Saturday, October 29th – Impromptu Fall Harvest for Kids:  Chef Char will have in-season, fall harvested, ingredients for the Power of Produce Kid’s to stop in and create a tasty snack.  They will make it, bake it and take it home or eat it while it is warm!  Kids are welcome to stop in between 10 a.m. and noon, and plan on staying at least 30 minutes to complete.

Go to www.eventbrite.com and search on Muskegon Farmers Market and all currently scheduled classes will pop up. Also subscribe to our Kitchen 242 Facebook Events Page to receive notification when new culinary events are added.

Lakeside Halloween Costume Parade
October 29 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Saturday, October 29 from 11:00am-12:30pm, come to the Pocket Park in Lakeside for the Halloween Costume Parade!  There’ll be prizes, trick or treating and cider and donuts.  Learn more at www.lakesidedistrict.com.

“A House Divided” MSU vs U of M Tailgate
October 29 @ 12:00 pm
Go Blue!  Go Green!  Join the Big Brothers/Big Sisters of the Lakeshore for the big game!  Their annual “A House Divided” MSU vs U of M Tailgate is happening October 29 aboard the USS LST 393 Veterans Museum.  The venue provides a large screen TV, several smaller TV’s and outdoor TVs for more viewing (and Tailgating) options.  Your ticket includes a pulled pork meal.  There’ll also be a bucket raffle, silent auction and a 50/50.  Tickets are $35 for adults and $15 for kids ages 4-10.  For more information, call 231-798-1391.

Culinary Class: Pasta & Pinot
October 30 @ 3:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Fresh pasta and wine, a taste combination that has stood the test of time!   Sunday, October 30 from 3:30-6:30pm, come to the Bygone Basics Culinary School for this adult only cooking class where you enjoy a couple of complimentary glasses of wine of Valerie’s choice (or non-alcoholic beverage), or bring your own favorite wine/beverage to enjoy as you learn techniques to create delicious pasta.  This session you will be making Basil Egg Noodles with a Quick Hearty Chicken Noodle Soup and Cheese Ravioli with Easy Marinara.  Each session includes instructions and samples, plus extra food to take back home.  After your pasta creation class, you’ll sit together and dine on your pasta and sauce creations.  The cost is $54 or $49 if you’re a guest at Amanda’s Bequest Bed & Breakfast.  For more information or to make reservations, call 231-740-4065.

Trunk or Treat
October 30 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Sunday, October 30 from 6:00-8:00pm, come to First Presbyterian Church (2577 Wickham Dr.) for Trunk or Treat! Put on a costume and join them in the church parking lot (or inside in case of rain) for candy, games and fun, all provided free of charge! For more information, call 231-759-1275.

Indoor Trick or Treat: Kainay’s Chocolate Factory
October 31 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
October 31 from 6:00-7:00pm, you are invited to Kainay’s Chocolate Factory for their Indoor Trick or Treat event!  In your wildest dreams you could not imagine the marvelous SURPRISES that await YOU!  This is a FREE family friendly event that is sure to be scrumdiddlyumptious!  For more information, call (231) 767-5246.

Trick or Treat at the South Pierhead Light
October 31 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Monday, October 31 from 4:00-6:00pm, come to the Muskegon South Pierhead Light for Trick or Treating!  Trick or Treating is free, of course!  Tower Climbing admission is $4 for adults and $2 for kids 11 and under.  You must be at least 3 ft. tall to climb.  For more information, call 1-844-MLIGHTS or e-mail Muskegonlights@gmail.com

Mission for Area People Fundraiser

Please join Mission for Area People for our upcoming Fundraiser
Thursday October 27, 2016 from 5:30pm to 8pm.

vines-steins-flyerGreat Silent Auction Items to bid on!
French Cuisine for 4 at the Hearthstone Bistro value $350

 Justin Abdelkader Signed Jersey & Hockey Puck Value $500

 2 exclusive tickets to Detroit Lions vs Jacksonville Jaguars game,
November 20 on the 50 yard line!

 Pandora bracelet from Sanborn’s

 2 oil changes, 5 car wash tickets

Overnight stay & dinner at the Shoreline Inn

NFL Bud Light mirror (16 x 24) from Tyler Sales   JUST TO NAME A FEW…

 Gift Cards from Local Restaurants Pomp a dos, Langlois Furniture. . . JUST TO NAME A FEW!

Entertainment
Billy Ryan, Solo & Dueling Pianos

 Appetizer Bar
Catered by Dave’s Kountry Katering

All this for just $20

 

Dead Candidate’s Name to Remain on Fruitport Township Ballot

Sherry Yonkers, one of the leading candidates for Fruitport Township trustee, is still listed on the ballot even though she has recently passed away. The ballot is already prepared and it is too late to remove her name.

Yonkers received the second highest number of votes in the August primary election. There are five additional candidates running for trustee in the November election, and the top four of these six will become the elected trustees. Apparently, if voters don’t know of her death, and Yonkers receives enough votes to be counted in the top four, the votes for her will not count and the candidate with the next highest number of votes would move up.

Evidently, absentee voters who already filed and voted for Yonkers may go to the Fruitport Township Hall to inquire about a new ballot if they want to change their vote, and write-in candidates may go there to register through October 28th.

For more information:
http://www.wzzm13.com/news/politics/dead-trustte-candidate-in-fruitport-township-on-the-ballot/339501583

Ask Dr. Universe – Leaves Changing Color

Why do leaves change color? –Lucy, 5, Seattle, WA
 
Dear Lucy,
 
Ever since I was a kitten, I’ve loved picking up big maple leaves in the fall. I’d take them home, put them under a piece of paper, and rub the side of a crayon over the top. It makes a great print of the leaf.
 
Leaves actually get their color from things called pigments. While scientists can use chemicals to make different crayon colors, nature can use pigments to create its own colors.
 
When leaves are green, they have a pigment called chlorophyll. Chlorophyll is not just important for color, though. Plants also need chlorophyll to collect energy from the sun to make their own food. Imagine if you could soak up sunshine, water, and stuff from the air to make your own food. That’s what plants do. They make their own food in a process we call photosynthesis.
 
My friend Asaph Cousins is a scientist at Washington State University who knows a lot about how plants function. He’s really curious about photosynthesis, too.
 
“It’s a remarkable process that helps convert energy from the sun into food for plants,” he said. “It’s a key part of life on our planet.”
 
Cousins explained that chlorophyll has the job of soaking in the sunlight and using energy to convert some gas from the air into sugars. In the spring and summer, when the sun is out, a plant needs to make a lot of chlorophyll to help create food. But in some places of the world, like here in the Pacific Northwest, the sun starts to set earlier and it gets colder in fall.   
 
As we pull out our scarves and mittens, trees get ready for the changing season in their own way. Their growth decreases and they start to store up some of that energy they made earlier in the year. This means photosynthesis slows down and they don’t need as much chlorophyll to make food. Photosynthesis slows and the chlorophyll inside the leaves breaks down—so we see less green before the leaves fall off.
 
Chlorophyll isn’t the only pigment in a leaf. There are also carotenoids, which are pigments that give fall leaves the yellow and orange colors we see. It’s the same pigment we find in sunflowers and carrots, too. You may remember from our question about apples, that the pigment called anthocyanin is responsible for the red color in the fruit. The same is true with red leaves.
 
Because there is so much chlorophyll in the leaf, it isn’t until the chlorophyll breaks down that the fall colors really start to pop out. Of course, not all trees lose their leaves in fall and grow new ones back in the spring. But the ones that do lose their leaves—the ones we call deciduous trees—can transform their colors in just a matter of weeks.
 
Once the leaves finally fall to the ground they make for some great piles to jump in, inspiration for art projects, and beautiful autumn scenes.
 
Sincerely,
Dr. Universe 
 

Try it out! What can you create with leaves? Send a pic of your own fall leaf project to Dr.Universe@wsu.edu. Ask Dr. Universe is a science-education project from Washington State University.

Ask Dr. Universe – Lunar Rovers

How do lunar rovers work? -Pedro, 10

Dear Pedro,

When I got your question, I started to imagine what it would be like to drive a rover on the moon. As we bounced along craters, we could kick up moon dust and stop to gather samples of moon rock.

Rovers on the moon, and other kinds of exploration vehicles, have helped us learn about places that are hard for humans to reach on their own. Each rover has a mission and they need a few key things to work.

First, a rover vehicle needs a power source. Some rovers are battery-powered, like the lunar roving vehicle. Other rovers use solar panels to harness energy from the Sun. These solar panels are usually on top of the rover. The electricity they produce powers the wheels and the sensors the rover uses to conduct science experiments.

Scientists and engineers ask questions about what job they want a rover to do, and the environment where the rover will be working. The moon, for example, has no air. The tires we Earthlings have on our bikes and cars wouldn’t work on the moon. In fact, these kinds of tires would explode there. On lunar roving vehicles, tires are made up of a steel wire mesh. They support the rover’s weight, and astronauts don’t have to worry about getting a flat tire.

While lunar roving vehicles required astronauts to drive them, some rovers go on solo missions. Well, they aren’t totally alone. As they dig in the extraterrestrial soil and take pictures of these distant places, they communicate what they learn back to Earth.

Scientists send out computer commands that tell the rover what to do using super-powerful radio transmitters. The rover’s antenna helps send and receive the messages. It takes about a one second delay to command a rover on the moon and up to 22.5 minutes to communicate with one on Mars.

I decided to meet up with my friend Phil Engel to learn more about Mars rovers. He and a team of fellow student engineers from Washington State University recently brought back their award-winning rover from a global competition at the Mars Desert Research Station in Utah.

Their rover has an arm, or excavator, to dig for samples of dirt. The rover also uses sensors—like those you can buy to test your garden’s soil—to get the scoop on what’s in the dirt, including its temperature, humidity, and saltiness.

“What a rover vehicle does on Mars is pretty simple,” Engel said. “But what we are doing here on Earth with that rover is pretty extraordinary.”

While it might not sound exciting to look for dirt, these samples can tell us a lot about the planet or moon. The elements in these samples can help us find answers to some of our big questions about life on Mars—if there used to be life there, if there’s life now, or if life could be there in the future.

Whether on Mars, the moon, or even remote places on our own planet, rovers roam around to help us explore and discover. Who knows—maybe one day you’ll help find new ways to make them work and build rovers that are out of this world.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe
Ask Dr. Universe is a science-education project from Washington State University. Send your question to Dr.Universe@wsu.edu

Watch the WSU team’s rover here: https://askdruniverse.wsu.edu/2016/06/23/lunar-rovers-work/ 

Fruitport Charter Township Planning Commission Meeting–October 18, 2016

Regular Planning Commission Meeting Minutes

Regular Planning Commission Meeting
Fruitport Charter Township
5865 Airline Road

Date: October 18, 2016

Chairman Jacobs brought the meeting to order at 7:00 p.m.

01. Roll Call:
A. Members Present: Jeff Jacobs, Mike Michelli Jr., Randy Lee, Brett Suchecki, Kyle Osterhart, & Geoff Newmyer.
B. Members Absent: Chuck Whitlow.

02. Approval of the September 20, 2016 Special Planning Commission Meeting Minutes:
A. The minutes were accepted by Chairman Jacobs as presented.

03. Approve / Amend Agenda:
A. Motion by Michelli Jr. to amend item #6 to a Special Use with a Site Plan for Building Addition. Supported by Newmyer.
1. Ayes: All in favor.
2. Nays: None.

04. Correspondence / Reports: None.

05. Public Comments pertaining to agenda topics: None. Chairman Jacobs explained the Public Hearing Process

New Business:
06. Special Use: Varney’s Fab. & Welding LLC
Parcel: 61-15-027-200-0003-00
Purpose: Special Use and Site plan for building addition to be used for storage
A. Osterhart motioned to open the public hearing with support by Lee
–1. Ayes: All in favor.
–2. Nays: None.
B. Scott Varney & Dave Whitlow, owner of the parcel: They have existing pole barns and are looking to add on to an existing building. All of the buildings are currently pole barn buildings with metal siding.
C. The new materials will match the existing materials.
D. All site lighting will remain on site.
E. Jacobs said the outside storage has to be moved inside. Scott said all outside materials will be stored inside as part of this project.
F. Osterhart suggested shifting the building two foot to the south (if possible) because it would then meet our ordinance because it would provide a break in the façade.
G. Osterhart motioned to close the public hearing with support by Newmyer.
–1. Ayes: All in favor
–2. Nays: None

1. Motion made by Michelli Jr. to grant the special use request for parcel 61-15-027-200-0003-00 for the following requested special use: building addition for storage.

2. The motion is based upon specific findings by the Township relative to the factors specified in Section 42-157 of the Zoning Chapter.
a. The special use will not be harmonious with and in accordance with the general objectives or with any specific objections of the Master Plan. This finding is based upon the following fact: Pre-Existing.
b. The special use will be designed, constructed, operated, and maintained so as to be harmonious and appropriate in appearance with the existing or intended character of the general vicinity, and it will not change the essential character of the same area. This finding is based upon the following fact: Varney’s Fab and Welding is pre-existing and new addition matches existing.
c. The special use will not be hazardous or disturbing to existing or future uses. This finding is based upon the following facts: Pre-Existing.
d. The special use will be a substantial improvement to property in the immediate vicinity and to the Township as a whole. This finding is based upon the following fact: It moves the outside storage inside and improves safety.
e. The special use will be served adequately by essential public facilities and services, or have them adequately provided by the applicant; facilities and services include highways, streets, police and fire protection, drainage structures, refuse disposal, and schools. This finding is based upon the following fact: Pre-Existing.
f. The special use will not create excessive additional requirements at public cost for public facilities and services and will not be detrimental to the economic welfare of the Township. This finding is based upon the following fact: Pre-Existing.
g. The special use will not involve uses, activities, processes, materials, and equipment and conditions of operation that will be detrimental to any persons, property, or the general welfare by reason of excessive production of traffic, noise, smoke, fumes, glare, or odors. This finding is based upon the following fact: Pre-Existing.
h. The special use will be consistent with the intent and purposes of the Zoning Chapter. This finding is based upon the following fact: Pre-Existing.
i. Any other findings regarding any other factors established by the Zoning Chapter for the proposed special use: None.

3. If the motion is to grant approval, the following conditions are established as authorized by Section 42-158 of the Zoning Chapter.
j. The special use must comply with the site plan, dated 9/9/2016, submitted to the Township, as well as any written material submitted by the applicant to the Township.
k. The special use must comply with all federal, state, and Muskegon County laws, rules, regulations, and requirements.
l. The special use must be acquired, developed, and completed in conformance with the Zoning Chapter, as amended, and the rest of the Fruitport Charter Township Code of Ordinances.
m. The construction of the special use must be completed within 1 year. This deadline may be extended by the Township, without going through the entire application process, upon request by the applicant and evidence showing that the applicant is proceeding in good faith toward completion.
n. If the special use approval is contingent upon public water service or public sanitary sewer service or both being provided, then no construction of the special use may begin until all required easements are in place, all required forms have been completed, and all approvals for service have been obtained.
o. A financial guarantee is required as allowed by Section 42-158(d) of the Zoning Chapter. The details of the financial guarantee are: None.
p. A digital copy of the site plan as approved shall be provided to the Fire Inspector at brian.michelli@mcd911.net, or such other e-mail address as the Fire Inspector may designate.
q. Any other conditions placed by the Township upon the special use:
–a. South wall to be offset 2’-0” from existing building.
–b. Lighting to remain on-site.
–c. No outside storage.

4. Supported by Lee.
r. Roll Call:
–a. Ayes: Michelli Jr., Lee, Newmyer, Osterhart, Suchecki, & Jacobs.
–b. Nays: None.

07. Site Plan: Vandermale Builders Inc. (owner – Hackett)
Parcel: 61-15-135-400-0064-00
Purpose: Site Plan for Private Road – Willis Drive
1. Brandon Simon, Nederveld Engineering, is speaking on behalf of Vandermale Builders. The plan is a realignment of an existing drive. The purpose is the owner wants to create a private entrance to his house while providing separate access to neighboring properties. There is adequate fire access within the drives. All utilities will be placed underground instead of overhead. All slopes are at or below 10%.
2. There will be a private road maintenance agreement for all residences served. Hackett has set himself up as the maintainer of the property.

B. Motion made by Michelli Jr. to approve the information provided by the Zoning Administrator with the following conditions:
1. The maintenance agreement is subject to the approval by the township attorney.

C. Supported by Lee.
1. Roll Call:
–a. Ayes: Michelli Jr., Lee, Newmyer, Osterhart, Suchecki, & Jacobs.
–b. Nays: None.

Unfinished Business:
08. New Ordinance Review: No discussion.

09. Public Comments:
A. Steve VerMerris, 3983 Woodlawn Street:
–1. Would like the board to consider backyard chickens in an R-1 district. It seems to be the trend with neighboring communities and he feels like it would be beneficial for Fruitport.
–2. Supervisor Werschem said it’s currently restricted & that he will get some neighboring ordinance language on the matter for us to review.
–3. The planning commission was open to the idea.

B. Werschem said all municipalities are now required to do rental inspections. We need to take a look at the language of rental inspections in the Ordinance.

10. Adjournment: There being no further discussion, the meeting was adjourned at 7:53 p.m.

Respectfully Submitted,
Kyle D. Osterhart, Secretary

Fruitport Charter Township Board Meeting – Agenda –October 24, 2016

A G E N D A  — FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP BOARD OF TRUSTEES
FRUITPORT TOWNSHIP HALL
5865 AIRLINE ROAD, FRUITPORT, MI 49415

10/24/2016

6:00 PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE
6:30 WORK SESSION
7:00 P.M. BOARD MEETING

    1. Pledge of Allegiance
    2. Roll Call
    3. Approval of Board Minutes: 10/10/16 Regular Meeting
    4. Approve / Amend Agenda
    5. Correspondence / Reports
    6. Public Comments

Unfinished Business

  1. Fury FC / Fruitport Soccer / Sheringer

New Business

  1. Air Pack Demonstration
  2. Approval of Bills
  3. Reports
  4. Public Comments
  5. Adjournment

The Township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the following Township Clerk: Carol Hulka, Fruitport Township Hall, 5865 Airline Road, Fruitport, MI 49415 – (231) 865-3151

Muskegon County Calendar of Events 10/17/16-10/24/16

Presented by the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau

Fabulous Fermentation!
October 18 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Event Navigation
Tuesday, October 18 from 6:30-8:00pm, come to Kitchen 242 inside the Muskegon Farmers’ Market for the presentation, “Fabulous Fermentation!”  Gather around the counter to learn how to restore your core health with local experts who will take you on a journey back to our food roots and rediscover better health through fermented foods.  To register call 231-728-3117 or e-mail farmedu@communityencompass.org.

We Are Stars
Tuesdays and Thursdays @ 7:00 pm
“We Are Stars” is a 35-minute, family-friendly adventure that that spans the billions of years between the Big Bang and modern day, and follows the thread that connects us all to those early times through the atoms from which our bodies are formed.  Where did they come from?  How did they get here?  And is it true that we really are all made of stars?  The science content is most appropriate for ages 11 and up; however, the entrancing animation and award-winning soundtrack will draw all ages into the magical universe created within this incredible show.  No reservations are needed for this FREE program, which runs August 23 – October 27 on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:00pm (doors open by 6:45), and includes a brief demonstration of the current night sky.  The planetarium is in room 135 of Muskegon Community College (221 S. Quarterline Rd, Muskegon).  For more information, or to schedule a private show for groups of 15-44, please call (231) 777-0289 or email tamera.owens@muskegoncc.edu.

TEDx
October 19 @ 12:30 pm
Event Navigation
Wednesday, October 19 at 12:30pm, come to the Beardsley Theater for TEDx!  TED is a nonprofit devoted to spreading ideas, usually in the form of short, powerful talks. At its inception in 1984, talks focused on technology, entertainment and design, and today include inspiring talks in more than 100 languages which range over politics, education, medicine, science, and global issues.  Tickets are $40 and available at the Frauenthal Box Office or through www.startickets.com.

AhFest: Films Based on Dennis Lehane Novels
October 19 @ 6:00 pm
Sit back, relax and enjoy a free movie and popcorn during AhFest!  “Mystic River,” “Gone Baby Gone,” “Shutter Island” and “The Drop” will be shown during the Muskegon Area Arts and Humanities Festival throughout October.  All four movies are based on novels by Dennis Lehane, whose lecture will close the festival on Thursday, October 27.  All movies will be shown at 6:00pm on Wednesdays at the Muskegon Museum of Art.  Beer and wine will be available at a cash bar.

Here’s the schedule:
Oct. 5: “Mystic River” (2003)
Oct. 12: “Gone Baby Gone” (2008)
Oct. 19: “Shutter Island” (2010)
Oct. 26: “The Drop” (2014)

Quick Art Crash Course
October 20 @ 6:00 pm
Event Navigation
Thursday, October 20 at 6:00pm, come to the Muskegon Museum of Art for a Quick Art Crash Course featuring prints by Mary Brodbeck.  There will be a film screening and artist Q & A.  Watch “Becoming Made: The Artist and a Japanese Woodblock Print,” and learn more about this traditional process and how Mary uses this technique for her contemporary prints.  Following the film, all are invited to join Mary in the Tuttle Gallery where her work will be on display.  She will answer questions and talk about her work and process. There will be a cash bar.  For more information, visit www.muskegonartmuseum.org.

Live Jazz: Checkers Morton
October 20 @ 7:00 pm
Event Navigation
Thursday, October 20 at 7:00pm, come to the Book Nook & Java Shop for live music from Checkers Morton.  For more information, call 231-894-5333.

Haunted Hall
Fridays and Saturdays in October
Haunted Hall, one of the county’s oldest haunted attractions, is back in 2016, and this year it’s designed to be bigger and better than ever. The attraction, which debuted in 1999, will take place at the Muskegon County Fairgrounds, 6621 Heights Ravenna Rd. in Fruitport Township, Fridays and Saturdays, October 1-29. This year’s theme is “The Quarantine Zone” and features three haunts for the price of one; The Foundry, The Bunker and The Containment Zone!  Enter all three haunts for only $15.00. Tickets can be purchased at the door with cash or credit card. Save $1.00 for every canned good you donate to Love, Inc. at the ticket office. Maximum of $3.00 off per ticket. This attraction is NOT recommended for children under 12 years of age or the faint of heart.   For more information, visit www.hauntedhall.com.

October Ghost Story Series: Speaking of Spirits
October 21 & 28 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
October 21 from 5:00-6:00pm, come to the Red Lotus Gallery “October Ghost Story Series: Speaking of Spirits!” Admission is free and refreshments are provided. Parental discretion is advised. Hear some chilling stories of the dead with this collaboration of true stories and first person encounters. Participants are encouraged to share their own first person encounters after the readings.

On Friday, October 28 from 5:00-6:00pm, it’s “True Irish Ghost Stories” by St. John D. Seymour (St. John Drelincourt). Take a trip back in time with the tales of peculiar events that take place in the 1800’s to early 1900’s. Participants are encouraged to tell old family or cultural ghost stories after the readings.

If you would like to RSVP or have questions email Sabryna at sabrynasnaturalcreations@hotmail.com.

Live Music: Classic Country Cats
October 21 @ 7:00 pm
Event Navigation
Friday, October 21 at 7:00pm, come to the Book Nook & Java Shop for live music from the Classic Country Cats!  For more information, call 231-894-5333.

Free Tours of the Hackley & Hume Site for Muskegon County Residents
Weekends in October
Tours of the homes of Muskegon’s most well-known lumber barons are free for Muskegon County residents on weekends during the month of October.  Saturday hours are 10:00am-4:00pm, Sunday hours are 1:00-4:00pm.  For more information, call 231-722-7578.

Depot to Depot Fall Color Tour
October 22 & 29 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Gather your family and friends to experience the vibrant Fall colors at the Depot-to-Depot Fall Color Tour! This free self-guided tour happens October 8, 15, 22 and 29 from 10:00am – 4:00pm. “Color Tourers” can pick up a map at either the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau located in the historic Union Depot at 610 W. Western Ave. in downtown Muskegon or at the White Lake Area Chamber/CVB at the Whitehall Depot 124 W. Hanson St. in downtown Whitehall. Using the map as a guide you’ll have the opportunity to visit stops along the way to win great prizes! Refreshments will be served at both the Muskegon and Whitehall Depots and kids will receive a free pumpkin that they can decorate on-the-spot. For more information call 231-724-3100.

Live Music: Two High Strung
October 22 @ 7:00 pm
Event Navigation
Saturday, October 22 at 7:00pm, come to the Book Nook & Java Shop for live music from Two High Strung!  For more information, call 231-894-5333.

West Michigan Concert Winds “Fall Into Jazz”
October 23 @ 4:00 pm
Event Navigation
October 23 at 4:00pm, come to the Frauenthal Theater for the West Michigan Concert Winds “Fall Into Jazz” free concert.  Guest artists, the Lakeshore Big Band, will perform a variety of jazz selections from all ranges of the jazz idiom.  It is also a concert for dancers, as you will have the opportunity to come to the stage and dance to the music of the Big Band Era!  For more information, call 231-727-8001.

 

Candidate Bio: Tim Burgess

Candidate for Fruitport School Board

Tim Burgess-pictureTim Burgess and his wife Tracy have been residents of Fruitport Township for fifteen years.  Their daughters have attending schools in the district throughout their academic careers, spanning fourteen years:  Maggie is a freshman at Ferris State University, Erika is a freshman at Fruitport High School, and Jackie is a second grader at Beach Elementary.  Tim has been an active member of the community for many years, coaching Teeball and pony tail softball, sitting on several non-profit boards, and participating in many fundraising events.  He is a member of Sts. Patrick and Anthony Church and the Knights of Columbus.

Tim is a proud graduate of Michigan State University (B.A. Social Science, 1993).  He has Land Bank Director for the County of Muskegon for the last six years and has worked for over a decade further in community development roles.  Intimate knowledge of real estate, housing stock, and intergovernmental relationships are a few of the key skills Tim would bring to the Board.

Tim’s goals for the Board would be fostering a sense of unity and common purpose among all affiliated with FCS, retention of students and teachers within the entire district, and planning for the future of facilities amid the potential for tremendous growth we find in our district.  Tim believes we face a critical point within our district, with impending development providing an opportunity to reach a level of success unimaginable only a few years ago.

 

The Difference A Vote Makes This Election Season

This upcoming election will leave an impact lasting three decades or more. The late U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia’s empty seat is casting a long shadow on the 2016 election. On Tuesday, November 8, voters will be deciding the fate of that seat and potentially three more, setting a course for our country for a generation.

More than one million unborn lives are taken each year through abortion; the future of as many as 30 million lives is at stake this election year.

Republican Donald Trump has released a list of judges as examples of who he would consider for the U.S. Supreme Court. The list has been praised by prolife groups and other organizations that believe that judges should follow the rule of law, not write laws. Trump has said his nominees may very well overturn Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion through all nine months of pregnancy.

Democrat Hillary Clinton has promised a litmus test requiring all of her judicial picks to support Roe v. Wade. Clinton supports overturning the Hyde Amendment, and if she succeeds taxpayers will be forced to pay for abortions. Clinton supported the legality of the barbaric partial-birth abortion during the process of birth.

The U.S. Supreme Court continues to have an oversized influence on national politics. For nine people who never face a vote of the public, they have supreme authority on fundamental issues of life and death.

Some legal thinkers and Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg have openly suggested that Roe v. Wade didn’t go far enough in promoting abortion, arguing that issues such as requiring tax-funded abortions should be guarantees beyond the realm of voter choice. Other broadly supported laws voters and their representatives have approved—requiring parental consent for an abortion or requiring abortion clinics to offer informed consent to women—could also be wiped away with the pounding of a gavel.

Basic conscience rights of doctors, nurses, and health care facilities will also be endangered. Those who believe in the value of every life have little influence over unelected judges who have a personal animus against those deeply-held beliefs.

The decision voters will make on November 8 could mean the difference between Roe v. Wade being overturned or furthered entrenched for decades, at the cost of tens of millions of lives.

For more information about the presidential candidates and free educational tools you can use, visit www.RTL.org/election.

— 
Chris Gast
Director of Communication/Education
www.RTL.org

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Ask Dr. Universe – Apples

Why are apples red? -Emily, 5, Seattle, WA

Dear Emily,

Just the other day I was biting into a crunchy, delicious red apple when I was reminded of your question. I started wondering why apples are red, too.

I called up my friend and apple expert Kate Evans, a scientist here at Washington State University. Her research helps us develop new kinds of apples.

Before she answered your question, she had a question for us to wonder about, too.

“What might the benefit be for a tree to have red fruit?” she asked. I thought about it for a moment. Then I remembered that in nature, colors could sometimes help send a message to plants and animals.

The message might be “Don’t eat me,” as is the case of some brightly colored poisonous frogs. Other times it might be a chameleon using its colors to attract a mate, like saying “Look over here!”

Evans explained that the apple’s red color might just be a way of telling hungry animals, “We are delicious.”

Long before humans were shopping for apples at the supermarket, bears were scavenging for the fruit in forests. Bears have a good sense of smell and pretty good vision that helps them look for food. One idea is that bears are particularly attracted to red, a color that really pops.

“A red apple is kind of a pretty, attractive, easy-to-see piece of fruit, especially against the green leaves,” Evans said.

When bears see the red fruit, they eat it, digest it, and poop out the seeds. In fact, Evans said, the point of the tree having fruit at all is to help the tree spread its seeds. That way new generations of trees can grow.

Of course, you may have noticed that not all apples are red. Some are yellow, pink, or green. Red apples get their color from anthocyanins. These are pigments, or natural colorings, that develop as the apple grows. We also find these pigments in cranberries, raspberries, cherries, cabbage, and other red or purple foods.

Whether you are on four legs or two, the red color can be really appealing, Evans said. A lot of humans like to eat red apples, too. Here in Washington State, we produce more than 2 million tons of apples each year, far more than any other state.

Another way to think about the answer to your question may be to look at how we see different colors. When we look at a red apple, it’s absorbing colors from the sunlight. It absorbs all the colors of the rainbow—except for red. The red light reflects off the apple and our brain and eyes work together to let us know what color we are seeing.

Red is a color that can be appealing to both humans and other animals. It’s also one of my favorite fall colors. To celebrate the season, I’m off to pick some red apples and press them into delicious cider.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Ask Dr. Universe is a science-education project from Washington State University. Send your question to Dr. Universe at AskDrUniverse.wsu.edu.

Ask Dr. Universe – Suns

How many suns are in the universe? -Kristen, 8, Pullman, WA

Dear Kristen,

Our sun is really one big star. And there are billions and billions of stars in our universe.

“More than we can even count,” added my friend Phil Lou. He’s an expert on solar energy here at Washington State University. He’s really curious about finding ways to power homes and schools using energy from the sun.

“Most of the energy and life around us that we know is linked to the sun,” he explained. Then we put on our sunglasses, slathered on some sunscreen, and headed out to explore.

As we walked along, we spotted some grass and plants. Lou pointed out that plants use energy from the sun to help make their own food. A leftover from this process is the oxygen that we breathe.

Humans can also get energy when they eat plants—or eat the animals that once ate the plants. The sun also puts energy into the oceans and evaporates water, which helps keep water moving through the planet. The sun heats land and air which causes wind and weather. All this energy from the sun is really important to support life on Earth, Lou explained.

“It also makes Hawaii and Fiji great places to go,” he added. It sometimes makes for nice sunny catnaps here where I live in Washington state, too.

Even the oil, coal, and gas we get from the ground and use to power cars and make electricity started with energy from the sun. These kinds of fuels came from old decomposing animals and plants—animals and plants that got their energy from the sun’s rays.

Stars, like the sun, can come in all kinds of colors, shapes, and sizes, too. Scientists put them in different categories depending on their size, brightness, and other characteristics. According to these rules, the sun falls into the category of a yellow star.

Scientists have also calculated that it’s about 27 million degrees Fahrenheit inside the sun’s core and more than 9,000 degrees Fahrenheit on its surface. Thankfully, we are 93 million miles away, so we get just the right amount of warmth and energy from it.

Although our sun might be the closest star to us on Earth, it certainly is not the biggest or brightest star in the universe.

“Our sun is fairly puny compared to some other stars,” Lou said.

In fact, if you put our sun next to the giant star VY Canis Majoris, you could barely see it. It’s a speck, like a grain of sand next to a basketball. Consider the fact that you could fit a million Earths in our sun and you can start to realize just how big some stars can get. We are still learning about different stars and if there might be more sun-like stars out in our universe.

“It gives us something to really ponder,” Lou said. “Isn’t that great?”

We would love to hear more questions from you about solar energy and how it works, too. Or send us your own ideas about how to use energy from the sun to power our world. Write to Dr. Universe at Dr.Universe@wsu.edu.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Ask Dr. Universe is a science-education project from Washington State University. Send your question to Dr.Universe@wsu.edu or read more at AskDrUniverse.wsu.edu.

Fruitport Charter Township Planning Commission Meeting — October 18th, 2016

AGENDA — PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP
5865 AIRLINE RD
FRUITPORT, MI 49415

October 18th, 2016 at 7:00 PM

  1. Roll Call
  2. Approval of Planning Commission Minutes: September 20, 2016
  3. Approve / Amend Agenda
  4. Correspondence / Reports
  5. Public Comments pertaining to agenda topics

New Business

  1. Site Plan: Varney’s Fab. & Welding LLC
    Parcel:      61-15-027-200-0003-00
    Purpose:   Site Plan for building addition to be used for storage
  1. Site Plan: Vandermale Builders Inc (owner-Hackett)
    Parcel:      61-15-135-400-0064-00
    Purpose:   Site Plan for Private Road – Willis Drive
  1. New Ordinance Review
  2. Public Comments
  3. Adjournment

 

The township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the Township Clerk: Carol Hulka, Fruitport Charter Township, 5865 Airline Rd, Fruitport, MI 49415 (231) 865-3151.

Fruitport Charter Township Board Of Trustees–October 10, 2016

FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP BOARD OF TRUSTEES
MEETING MINUTES OF OCTOBER 10, 2016

A work session of the Fruitport Charter Township Board began at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, October 10, 2016, in the township board room.

Members Present: Brian Werschem, Supervisor; Carol Hulka, Clerk; Rose Dillon, Treasurer; Trustees Ron Becklin, Dave Markgraf, and Marjorie Nash. Members Absent: Trustee Chuck Whitlow

At 7:00 p.m., Supervisor Werschem opened the regular meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance followed with a prayer.

Also Present: 22 – residents, 0 – employees, 0 – guests, and Public Safety Director, Michelli

The meeting minutes of September 26, 2016, regular meeting, were approved as presented.

The meeting agenda for October 10, 2016, was approved as presented.

CORRESPONDENCE / REPORTS
1)Michigan Townships Association legislative updates
2)Fruitport Township Parks and Recreation meeting minutes dated August 23 and September 27, 2016
PUBLIC COMMENTS
Kristy and Steve Jones, 5703 Fairview Ct., spoke on the Kendra Road road problem. Many other residents of Stillwater Springs were also in attendance supporting the need to have Kendra Road repaired.

REPORTS—none received

 UNFINISHED BUSINESS:

16-087 Reclamation of Cemetery Plots
Clerk Carol Hulka gave a report on the reclaiming of cemetery burial spaces in Pine Hill Cemetery. After a thorough investigation of forfeiture of unused and neglected burial spaces, 249 sites are able to be reclaimed. In addition, 90 additional grave sites are being added to unoccupied land located behind the mausoleum in Pine Hill Cemetery.

16-088 Fruitport Soccer / Sheringer
Chris Belasco, from the Fruitport Soccer Club, spoke on making some changes to the current Fruitport Soccer Club License Agreement. There was discussion with no action taken.

16-089 Retail Fraud Ordinance – Second Reading and Adoption
Dave Markgraf moved, Carol Hulka supported, MOTION CARRIED, for the adoption of the Retail Fraud Ordinance #798 that will protect the public health, safety, and general welfare by prohibiting certain defined behavior in the Charter Township of Fruitport, and to provide for an effective date which is 30 days after its publication in the Muskegon Chronicle.

This constitutes the second and final reading.

Ayes: Markgraf, Hulka, Dillon, Nash, Becklin, Werschem         Nays: None

 NEW BUSINESS

16-090 Payment of Bills
Dave Markgraf moved, Marjorie Nash seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to approve bills for payment in the following amounts: General Fund & Parks $8,384.14; Public Safety $17,955.99; Water $;85,240.86 and   Sewer $588.81.         Totaling:  $ 113,384.68

Ayes: Markgraf, Nash, Becklin, Dillon, Hulka, Werschem  Nays: None

 REPORTS
Public Safety Director, Brian Michelli, reported that inquiries have been coming up regarding whether charitable organizations may solicit contributions in public roadways. In the past, the Township didn’t get involved in this issue. Director Michelli presented a ruling dated July 29, 2016, from Attorney General Bill Schuette, on this matter. The ruling was summed up stating that Rule 713, of the Uniform Traffic Code, prohibits a person in the improved portion of a roadway from soliciting contributions in support of a civic or charitable organization from the occupant of any vehicle.   Mich Admin Code, R 28.1713.

After discussion, the Board agreed to follow the Attorney General’s ruling.

Resident Chuck Larson, Stringer Road, presented a newspaper picture that appeared on the front page of the local Clipper newspaper dated February 11, 1970. The picture was of a Fruitport Township board meeting where officials exchanged views on various issues including combining water supply efforts with the Fruitport Village.

 PUBLIC COMMENTS: PART II –   None received

The motion by Ron Becklin, supported by Dave Markgraf, was carried unanimously, to adjourn the meeting at 8:09 p.m.

_______________________________           ______________________________

CAROL HULKA, CLERK                              BRIAN WERSCHEM, SUPERVISOR

Candidate Bio: Denise Winebarger

Candidate for Fruitport Township Trustee

denise-winebargerI would like to be a voice for the public

Qualifications:
• Bachelor’s Degree, Western Michigan University (Business/Computer Science/Mathematics)
• Associate Degree, Muskegon Community College (Business/Accounting)
• Michigan Certified Assessing Technician (MCAT)
• Graduate of Muskegon Police Dept. Citizen’s Academy
• Family Financial Credit Union Board Member
• Presently: Muskegon County District Court Clerk
• Previous: Holton Township Administrative Clerk

I Would Appreciate Your Vote

Muskegon Walk Raises $48,000 for Alzheimer’s

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION WALK TO END ALZHEIMER’S® IN MUSKEGON RAISES $48,000
More than 325 Muskegon area residents raise awareness, funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research

alzheimers-walk

 Muskegon, MI – More than 325 residents from the Muskegon area joined the Alzheimer’s Association’s Walk to End Alzheimer’s® and united in a movement to reclaim the future for millions on Saturday, September 24 at Heritage Landing. Participants raised more than $48,000 to fund Alzheimer’s care, support and research programs.

“With over 180,000 people in Michigan living with Alzheimer’s disease and over half a million caregivers, it’s a cause that has touched the lives of far too many Muskegon area residents,” says Elizabeth Donnelly-Johnson, Community Outreach Coordinator for the Alzheimer’s Association, Michigan Great Lakes Chapter. “I think that’s why the community really embraces it every year. It’s inspiring to look out at a sea of purple and know we’re making a difference.”

Walk to End Alzheimer’s participants did more than complete the one or three mile Walk routes. They learned about Alzheimer’s disease and how to get involved with this critical cause, from advocacy opportunities, clinical studies and support programs and services. The event also included an emotional tribute to those who have experienced or are experiencing Alzheimer’s.

Special thanks to Muskegon Hope Riders for being a Platinum Sponsor of this year’s event.

Alzheimer’s disease is a growing epidemic and the nation’s sixth-leading cause of death. As baby boomers age, the number of individuals living with Alzheimer’s disease will rapidly escalate, increasing well beyond today’s more than 5 million Americans to as many as 16 million by 2050. For more information or to make a donation, visit alz.org/walk.

Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s®
The Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s is the world’s largest event to raise awareness and funds for Alzheimer care, support and research. Since 1989, the Alzheimer’s Association mobilized millions of Americans in the Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk®; now the Alzheimer’s Association is continuing to lead the way with Walk to End Alzheimer’s. Together, we can end Alzheimer’s – the nation’s sixth-leading cause of death.

Alzheimer’s Association®
The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer’s research, care and support. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. Visit alz.org® or call 800.272.3900.

Community-wide Remembrance Service

3rd Annual Community-wide Remembrance Service in Muskegon, Michigan

remembrance-service

Recently, two of West Michigan’s community hospice leaders, Harbor Hospice and Mercy Health Hospice, hosted another Community Remembrance at Heritage Memorial Garden in downtown Muskegon. The ceremony encompassed a program of music, readings and over 70 bulbs planted to help individuals and families in our community to both mourn the death and honor the life of a loved one.

The Community Remembrance was held on Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 6:00 pm at the Heritage Memorial Garden located at 545 W. Western Ave. Pam Babbitt developed the garden in honor of her late husband. It is a beautiful haven in downtown Muskegon and an incredible representation of the love that remains even after a person dies. Feedback about the event included comments like “I can’t thank you enough for this type of venue and even to keep our loved ones memory alive. It means so much to me” and “I am so happy to have been able to come to this event”. These comments really give expression to the organic needs of grievers. In our culture, mourning is becoming increasingly taboo. Grief is a natural and normal response to loss and mourning is how one heals. It was our privilege to offer an opportunity to share in the midst of grief and loss an opportunity to mourn in an environment of acceptance and understanding.

Thank you to everyone who shared in this special ceremony with us.

Happy Hour Fundraiser

Join us for this fun Happy Hour Event: 
Vines & Steins, a Happy Hour Fundraiser. Thursday, October 27, 2016, from 5:30 – 8:00 p.m. at the Folkert Community Hub, 640 Seminole Rd., Norton Shores.

vines-steins-flyer

Click on the picture to view a larger image.

Tickets may be purchased at the Mission for Area People office at 2500 Jefferson Av, Muskegon Heights 49444 or call 231-733-9672 for more information.

It is through the generous support of our community, Mission for Area People is able to continue to provide programs such as: Healthy Food Pantry, Medical Support Fund, Emergency Dental Assistance, Clothing Pantry, Back Packs for Kids, Thanks Giving Baskets, Christmas Toys and Rental Assistance (when rental funds are available.)

Thank you for all your help!

Candidate Bio: DJ Hilson

djhilson

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Mr. Hilson graduated from Thomas Cooley Law School in 1999 with honors and started as an assistant prosecutor in Muskegon County Prosecutor that same year.
DJ Hilson has appeared in every courtroom in Muskegon County trying over 80 felony cases including several murders, violent assaults, and criminal sexual conduct cases. In August of 2012, DJ Hilson was elected as the Muskegon County Prosecutor.
DJ Hilson believes in serving the community. He is a member of Muskegon Rotary, Prince of Peace Knights of Columbus Council 15337, Fraternal Order of Police, and the Muskegon Heights Optimist Club, Child Abuse Council (President), Drug Free Coalition of Muskegon (Vice-Chair), Alliance for Mrijuana Prevention (AMP) (Chair), Social Justice Commission, Mediation and Restorative Services, Alcohol Liability Initiative (Past-Chair), Boys and Girls Club of Muskegon (President of the Board), Muskegon Catholic Central Board of Trustees, and the School to Prison Pipeline Task Force. DJ Hilson was the 2013-14 Past President of the Muskegon County Bar Association. At the State level, Mr. Hilson serves on the Board of Directors for the Prosecuting Attorneys Association of Michigan, currently serving as its Vice-President. In April of 2015, DJ Hilson was appointed by Governor Snyder to represent PAAM and all Michigan County Prosecutors on the Criminal Justice Policy Commission. DJ Hilson is happily married to his wife Tricia and has been blessed with two sons and a daughter.

Candidate Bio: Mark Fairchild

Candidate for Muskegon County Register of Deeds

mfairchild“Mark F. Fairchild, 57 years old residing at 893 Center Street, Muskegon, MI 49442, Married to Shelley for 24 years with our 20 year old son Charlie.
I have served as your Muskegon County Register of Deeds for the last 17 Years. I am a Past Muskegon County Commissioner for 13 Years & Branch Manager for a National Mortgage Lender.
The Register of Deeds Office is very Important to the Citizens, Businesses and Local Economy of Muskegon County. Last year alone the Register=s Office Recorded and Protected Billions of Dollars in new Real Estate Transactions. I have been successful in achieving many positive improvements in the Register of Deeds Office. Those improvements allow me to protect your most Important Real Estate Assets, deliver exceptional customer service and save your Tax Dollars. Those Improvements Online include Property Fraud Guard, Home Security Search and Access to the last 55 years of Register of Deeds Records at www.co.muskegon.mi.us/deeds
I believe I have the Experience, Dedication and Professional Background to continue providing the Government Leadership and Great Customer Service that the Register of Deeds Office currently provides.  ‘No politics-just public service, The Door is Always Open’
Thank you, Mark F. Fairchild”

Candidate Bio: Sue Buckner

Candidate for Sullivan Township Clerk

“My name is Sue Buckner and I am seeking re-election for Sullivan Township Clerk. I have held this position for six years and want to continue to serve Sullivan Township. I am a lifelong resident of Sullivan Township with strong community ties.
Being your Clerk is a big responsibility.
* I maintain township records such as board meeting minutes, book of oaths, and voter registration files.
* I conduct elections and ensure accuracy and transparency.
* I develop and monitor the township budget; maintaining the township’s financial health.
* I am the Board Liaison to the Planning Commission.
I would appreciate your vote and continued support on November 8.”

Candidate Bio: Greg Hulka

Candidate for Fruitport Township Trustee

“Dear Fruitport Area Voters, my name is Greg Hulka. I am running for Fruitport Township Trustee. It would be an honor to serve on our board. I am a life long resident of Fruitport. I graduated from Fruitport High in 1981. I have been married to Lisa for 25 years, we have three children; Samantha, Rachel, and Michael. We also have five grand children.
I am a strong proponet of the casino, if people wish to attend a casino I would rather have them support our local economy than travel across the state. I previously served on our board as trustee from 2004-2008.
I will continue to support our local public safety, police and fire. I served on our department of public works board my last term. We are blessed with the departments that we have. I will make only one promise and that will be to work hard to better our community and try my best to represent everyone. I would appreciate your support November 8th. Thanks, Greg Hulka”

Thanks from the Mission for Area People

Thank You!!
Thanks to all who support Mission for Area People in many different ways!

Special Thanks to Senator Hansen for his annual pig donation for our food pantry. For the past few years Senator Hansen has been helping the MAP food pantry by purchasing a pig and having it packaged for our pantry. Thank you Senator Geoff Hansen for thinking of Mission for Area People as we continued to provide for community neighbors in need.

Thank you to the Sister Simone Courtade Fund for the generous gift for our Medical Support as well as our Healthy Choice Food Pantry. The support from these gifts will help provide necessary emergency medical needs as well as healthy food choices for our pantry.

Thank you United Way of the Lakeshore Day of Caring for orchestrating hundreds of volunteers from all over who give their time and talents to 10 local non‐profits in our community, Mission for Area People being one of them. Thank you team leader Corey Watson for all your hard work.

Thank you Chris from CC Carpet for donating the carpet for our lobby and stairway.

Thank you Roy from Port City for donating 5 gallons of paint for our lobby.

Thank you to all of the volunteers who made the Day of Caring a special event. Your support of Mission for Area People is very much appreciated.


map-christmas-needs

Muskegon County 4-H Awards Ceremony

The 2016 Muskegon County 4-H Awards Ceremony was held on October 3, 2016 at the Muskegon Area Career Tech Center. Approximately 190 4-H members, volunteers and parents were in attendance. The night was spent recognizing 4-H members and volunteers for their accomplishments and years of service during the 2015-2016 4-H Club Year. Representative Holly Hughes, Senator Goeff Hansen, Muskegon County Clerk, Nancy Waters, and Muskegon County Commissioner Wilkins was in attendance as well.

guests

2016 Awards Ceremony with Special Guests

Some of the awards presented were:

4-H Leader Years of Service Awards
1 Year of Service for 2015-2016

1st year

2016 Awards 1st Year Leaders

Dennis Arends – Nunica
Kim Beebe – Muskegon
Misty Carr – Norton Shores
Joan Conklin – Muskegon
Angie Fairbrother – Ravenna
Richard Fairbrother – Ravenna
Kelly Johnson – Cedar Springs
Patti Lantz – Muskegon
Renee Martin – Nunica
Pamela McCaleb – Grand Haven
Jill Norton – Spring Lake
Shelley Ostric – Spring Lake
Heidi Raap – Kent City
Amy Richards – Norton Shores
Stacey Skilling – Ravenna
Matthew Wert – Grant

5 Years of Service
Matthew Block – Ravenna
Chris Clark – Fruitport
Christy Deal – Spring Lake
Christine Franzon – Whitehall
Rhonda Gregory – Muskegon
Amanda Peebles – Ravenna

15 Years of Service
Jenny Erffmeyer – Ravenna

45 Years of Service
Margret Kingsbury – Conklin

45years

2016 Awards Margret Kingsbury – 45 years of service


4-H Project Medal Awards

4-H county medals are given to 4-H members who have greatly improved their skills in a particular project or projects or whose project involvement has been significant and successful. Up to 2 medals from each 4-H project area are awarded each year.

2016 4-H Project Medal Awards

Achievement
Alexis Foreman – Nunica
Riley Foreman – Nunica

Agriculture
Trevor Block – Ravenna
Ian Waldecker – Conklin

Beef
Brynn Kantola – Ravenna
Jessica Zahm – Marne

Cat
Sydney Bleich – Fruitport
Jessica Horne – Fruitport

Cavy
Ronni Gregory – Muskegon
Kaylyn Skuse-Freye – Whitehall

Dairy
Katelyn Stevens – Ravenna
Ian Waldecker – Conklin

Dogs
Anthony English – Ravenna
Madilyn English – Ravenna

Foods and Nutrition
Joleen Cejmer – Muskegon
Hannah Stevens – Ravenna

Goats
Kelley Chase – Conklin
Cassie Perrin – Coopersville

Horse
Stefanie Beckley – Spring Lake
Tessa Rush – Spring Lake

Judging
Cassie Perrin – Coopersville
Kathleen Zahm – Marne

Leadership
Joleen Cejmer – Muskegon
Katelyn Stevens – Ravenna

Llama/Alpaca
Makenna Bitely – Twin Lake
Kaylyn Skuse-Freye – Whitehall

Personal Development
Stefanie Beckley – Spring Lake
Cammie Clark – Fruitport

Rabbits
Abagail Hichue – Muskegon
Megan Norton – Spring Lake

Sheep
Cassie Perrin – Coopersville
Natalie Perrin – Coopersville

Shooting Sports
Kaeden Bitely – Twin Lake
Ty Maycroft – Ravenna

Swine
Cammie Clark – Fruitport
Kristen Moyer – Ravenna

Visual Arts
Joleen Cejmer – Muskegon
Ronni Gregory – Muskegon

Wood Science
Justin Hichue – Muskegon

Aged Out 4-H Members
This group of 4-H members has finished their 4-H journey. It is my hope that the skills they have acquired in 4-H will remain with them throughout their life. Thank you for being excellent role models for the younger 4-H members in this county and I wish you the best of luck in your future endeavors.

Brooke Whipple
Cheyenne Latsch
Clara Carr
Joleen Cejmer
Katelyn Stevens
Madaline Knight
Nitosha Radosa
Rachel Dodde
Rebecca Goodno
Rosa Moody
Sarah Conklin
Thomas Rozema

2016 Muskegon County 4-H Awards

The 2016 Muskegon County 4-H Leaders Council Community Service Award belongs to the Busy Bees 4-H Club.

2016 Awards Community Service Award - Busy Bees

2016 Awards Community Service Award – Busy Bees

Some of their community service projects included donating 6 cases of water for delivery to those in need in Flint, a community garden at the Covenant Community Church, helped serve breakfast at the First Congregational Church, and assisted with the Food Truck at the Covenant Community Church. The Busy Bees 4-H Club strives to help others in their community. This shows the 4-H members the value and need for service to others. The Busy Bees 4-H Club meets in Muskegon.

The 2016 Horse Sportsmanship Award goes to Tessa Rush.

tessa

2016 Awards Horse Sportsmanship Award

The Horse Sportsmanship Award goes to a 4-H member who exemplifies outstanding sportsmanship during the 2015-2016 4-H Club Year. Tessa is from Spring Lake.

The 2016 Marion Judd 4-H Award goes to Bobby Wagenborg.

bobby

2016 Awards Marion Judd Award

The Marion Judd 4-H Award was established by the Muskegon County 4-H Leaders Council in memory of Mrs. Marion Judd, who served as a 4-H club leader for over 40 years. Mrs. Judd took special pride in recognizing those 4-H members who showed the greatest personal growth and improvement in their 4-H projects and activities. Bobby is from Coopersville.

The 2016 Friend of 4-H Award belongs to SAF Holland.

friend

2016 Awards Friend of 4-H Award

The Friend of 4-H Award is awarded to an individual who has provided significant contributions and assistance to 4-H programming and is not presently enrolled as a 4-H leader. The Charity Committee at SAF Holland made the decision to give their earning from the company picnic to the Muskegon County 4-H Make the Match Endowment Fund. On June 21, SAF Holland’s company picnic held numerous events to raise money for the 4-H Endowment Fund. A display table of information regarding 4-H was available for the employees to understand the mission and vision of 4-H. SAF-Holland raised $1000 and a check was presented to Muskegon County 4-H at the opening ceremonies of the Muskegon County Fair. Thank you SAF Holland for believing in the future of the Muskegon County 4-H Program and helping to sustain 4-H in this county.

The 2016 Muskegon County 4-H Leader of the Year is Rhonda Gregory. Rhonda was a devoted 4-H leader and parent. She ran every 4-H club meeting, community service project, and activity the Denim N Dust club participated in. Even during her struggle with cancer treatments Rhonda was still always present and committed to her 4-H Club. She was always available to help any child or parent whenever they needed assistance. Her devotion, commitment, and friendships to 4-H makes her a perfect candidate for the 4-H Leader of the Year Award. She will forever hold a place in the Denim N Dust 4-H Club, the hearts of its members, and the 4-H community. Rhonda lost her battle with cancer shortly before the Fair in July. Rhonda will be honored and remembered always for the impact she made on the children and adults in the Muskegon County 4-H. Rhonda was from Muskegon. State 4-H Award – This is the highest honor bestowed on Michigan 4-H youth. This program is for 4-H youth aged 13 and up with at least three years of 4-H experience. This past year Cassie Perrin from Coopersville applied for the State 4-H Award and was invited to be a State 4-H Delegate for the Sheep Science project area. I would like to recognize her for her hardwork and commitment to excellence.

Muskegon County Calendar of Events 10/10/16-10/17/16

Presented by the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau

We Are Stars
Tuesdays and Thursdays @ 7:00 pm
There’s a new show at the Carr-Fles Planetarium!  “We Are Stars” is a 35-minute, family-friendly adventure that that spans the billions of years between the Big Bang and modern day, and follows the thread that connects us all to those early times through the atoms from which our bodies are formed.  Where did they come from?  How did they get here?  And is it true that we really are all made of stars?  The science content is most appropriate for ages 11 and up; however, the entrancing animation and award-winning soundtrack will draw all ages into the magical universe created within this incredible show.  No reservations are needed for this FREE program, which runs August 23 – October 27 on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:00pm (doors open by 6:45), and includes a brief demonstration of the current night sky.  The planetarium is in room 135 of Muskegon Community College (221 S. Quarterline Rd, Muskegon).  For more information, or to schedule a private show for groups of 15-44, please call (231) 777-0289 or email tamera.owens@muskegoncc.edu.

AhFest: Films Based on Novels by Dennis Lehane
October 12, 19 & 26 @ 6:00 pm
Sit back, relax and enjoy a free movie and popcorn during AhFest!  “Mystic River,” “Gone Baby Gone,” “Shutter Island” and “The Drop” will be shown during the Muskegon Area Arts and Humanities Festival throughout October.  All four movies are based on novels by Dennis Lehane, whose lecture will close the festival on Thursday, October 27.  All movies will be shown at 6:00pm on Wednesdays at the Muskegon Museum of Art.  Beer and wine will be available at a cash bar.

Oct. 12: “Gone Baby Gone” (2008)
Oct. 19: “Shutter Island” (2010)
Oct. 26: “The Drop” (2014)

Avenue Q: The Musical
October 12 @ 7:30 pm – October 15 @ 7:30 pm
Come to Muskegon Community College’s Overbrook Theater October 12 – 15 at 7:30pm for “Avenue Q: The Musical,” the story of what happens when the simple promises of childhood meet the messier, more complex realities of adulthood – but with puppets!  Winner of the 2004 Tony Award for Best Musical, Best Score, and Best Book, “Avenue Q: The Musical” mingles live actors alongside colorful puppets reminiscent of children’s shows like “Sesame Street,” however, this is no show for children and is recommended for mature audiences only.  The show features Aidan Smith, Erin Mickelson, Gabe Cerchiori, Aaron Ponce, Sarah Stepanek, Tim Hegedus, Paul Dickens-Jacobs, Katie McCool, D’marco Hughes, Hannah Erdman, Adrianne Lewis, Madisen Schuppe, Claire Beaman and Bonnie Weise.  The cost is $10.  For more information, call 231-777-0583.

Art & a Glass: Thursday Happy Hour at the MMA
October 13 @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Every Thursday from 4:00-8:00pm you’re invited to the Muskegon Museum of Art for “Art & a Glass!” Bring your friends to a museum-style happy hour! Take a break and enjoy the art with a glass of wine or a great craft brew. General admission is free Thursday evenings from 4:00 to 8:00 pm so take advantage of the opportunity to discover your Museum at no cost. There will be a cash bar. You must be 21 or older to purchase and consume alcoholic beverages. For more information call 231-720-2570.

Girls Night Out: Margaritas and Mexican Fiesta with Chef Char
October 13 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
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Thursday, October 13th – Girls Night Out – Margaritas and Mexican Fiesta with Chef Char 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Join us as we fill the kitchen with tasty and fresh fiesta foods. Chef Char will share her favorite recipes for guacamole, salsa fresca, carne asada, homemade tortilla chips and creative flavors with crema. We will then splurge on cinnamon churros and freshly squeezed fruit Margaritas. Must be over 21. Cost $45.

Go to www.eventbrite.com and search on Muskegon Farmers Market and all currently scheduled classes will pop up. Also subscribe to our Kitchen 242 Facebook Events Page to receive notification when new culinary events are added.

Thursday Night Music Club: Oh Brother Big Sister
October 13 @ 7:00 pm
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The Norton Shores Library hosts the musical duo Oh Brother Big Sister, Thursday, October 13 at 7:00pm!  With a comfortable, comedic essence that makes you feel like you’re with old friends, the big-sister-little-brother duo deliver music that encompasses a wide variety of music genres with an original acoustic sound that makes each performance an experience.  This event is free!  For more information, contact Alison at 231-780-8844 or apurgiel@madl.org.

Haunted Hall
Fridays and Saturdays in October
Haunted Hall, one of the county’s oldest haunted attractions, is back in 2016, and this year it’s designed to be bigger and better than ever. The attraction, which debuted in 1999, will take place at the Muskegon County Fairgrounds, 6621 Heights Ravenna Rd. in Fruitport Township, Fridays and Saturdays, October 1-29. This year’s theme is “The Quarantine Zone” and features three haunts for the price of one; The Foundry, The Bunker and The Containment Zone!  Enter all three haunts for only $15.00. Tickets can be purchased at the door with cash or credit card. Save $1.00 for every canned good you donate to Love, Inc. at the ticket office. Maximum of $3.00 off per ticket. This attraction is NOT recommended for children under 12 years of age or the faint of heart.   For more information, visit www.hauntedhall.com.

Muskegon Lumberjacks Home Game
October 14 @ 7:15 pm – October 15 @ 7:15 pm
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Friday, October 14 and Saturday, October 15 at 7:15pm, come to the L.C. Walker Arena as the Muskegon Lumberjacks take on the Youngstown Phantoms!  The Muskegon Lumberjacks are proud members of the United States Hockey League, the nation’s only Tier I junior hockey league and the leading producer of NCAA players and National Hockey League draft picks in the United States. The Lumberjacks’ organization prides itself on developing not just premier hockey talent, but also exceptional young men outside the arena of sports. For more information, visit www.muskegonlumberjacks.com.

Free Tours of the Hackley & Hume Site for Muskegon County Residents
Saturdays and Sundays in October
Tours of the homes of Muskegon’s most well-known lumber barons are free for Muskegon County residents on weekends during the month of October.  Saturday hours are 10:00am-4:00pm, Sunday hours are 1:00-4:00pm.  For more information, call 231-722-7578.

Homemade Apple Pies with Chef Char Morse
October 15 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am
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Saturday, October 15th – Homemade Apple Pies with Chef Char Morse 9:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. Learn to make a delicious homemade pie crust and various fillings for holiday dessert pies or meals. Demo and discuss: how to make perfect pie crust, how to roll out dough, how to make a lattice top crust, and importance of egg wash and venting in top crust. You will be making a pie to take home and you can bake it while in class or take it home for baking later.   Older Teens and Adults. Cost $35.

Go to www.eventbrite.com and search on Muskegon Farmers Market and all currently scheduled classes will pop up. Also subscribe to our Kitchen 242 Facebook Events Page to receive notification when new culinary events are added.

Lakeside Emporium Autumn Fest
October 15 @ 9:30 am
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Lakeside Emporium is holding its 1st annual Lakeside Emporium Autumn Fest! One of the highlights will be the Lakeside Emporium Sweetest Day Parade to be held on Saturday, October 15th at 9:30am. The purpose of this autumn parade is to serve as a “harvest “ for those in need in our community. Those groups and marching units that have been invited to participate have been collecting food items and new/unused winter wear (coats, gloves, mittens, hats, scarves), that will be distributed to The Kids’ Food Basket and other area food banks and shelters. The groups’ donations will be paraded along the route via carts, wagons, etc. Parade watchers can bring items as well and present them after the parade at the Lakeside Emporium. The parade is short (from McCracken to Torrent), this will be a fun event to benefit a really good cause. At the conclusion of the parade (Emporium parking lot), some performers will play again so that the audience will have another chance to enjoy the performances. Come one, come all Saturday, October 15th with step-off at 9:30 am. If you or your group would like to march and haven’t been contacted, please contact Laureen Samples at 231-755-9933.

Depot to Depot Fall Color Tour
October 15, 22 and 29 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Gather your family and friends to experience the vibrant Fall colors at the Depot-to-Depot Fall Color Tour! This free self-guided tour happens October 8, 15, 22 and 29 from 10:00am – 4:00pm. “Color Tourers” can pick up a map at either the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau located in the historic Union Depot at 610 W. Western Ave. in downtown Muskegon or at the White Lake Area Chamber/CVB at the Whitehall Depot 124 W. Hanson St. in downtown Whitehall. Using the map as a guide you’ll have the opportunity to visit stops along the way to win great prizes! Refreshments will be served at both the Muskegon and Whitehall Depots and kids will receive a free pumpkin that they can decorate on-the-spot. For more information call 231-724-3100.

Creative Saturday
October 15 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm
Join Muskegon Center for the Arts members in creative idea exchanges, inspiration and camaraderie as you work on your own project the 3rd Saturday of every month from 10:00am-1:00pm at the Red Lotus Gallery.  “Creative Saturdays” are for ages 12 and up and are free to the public, but donations are always welcomed. Bring a new or current working project and your own supplies for your artwork; whether it be sewing, drawing or painting projects.  Artists’ trading cards are also available.  For more information visit  www.muskegonca.org.

Appraisal Fair
October 15 @ 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
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October 15 from 10:00am – 4:00pm, come to the Muskegon Museum of Art for an Appraisal Fair!  Are you curious about the history and value of jewelry, artwork, antiques and other treasures in your collection?  Professional appraisers will be on hand to satisfy your curiosity at this event.  All proceeds benefit the Museum.
Verbal appraisals are $15 per item or set (includes MMA gallery admission).  Museum members will receive a $3 discount per item or set.  Written appraisals cannot be provided at this event.  For more information, call 231-720-2570.

From Page to Screen
October 15 @ 1:30 pm
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Saturday, October 15 at 1:30pm, the Norton Shores Library hosts “From Page to Screen!”  Participants will discuss Dennis LeHane’s suspenseful thriller Mystic River and then watch the 2003 movie.

Is the book always better than the movie?  If you love to read and watch movies, combine your passion for both! October’s book is Mystic River, a gripping mystery about three young boys and a childhood tragedy that continues to affect their adult lives.  The movie was directed by Clint Eastwood and starred Sean Penn, Tim Robbins and Kevin Bacon.  “From Page to Screen” includes an informal discussion of both formats, plus there’s free popcorn!  Copies of the book are available at the Library while supplies last. This program is free and open to the public ages 18 and up. F or additional information, contact Alison at 231-780-8844 or apurgiel@madl.org.

KnowSmoke Zombie Walk
October 15 @ 2:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Join the Knowsmoke Zombie Walk and declare yourself part of the smoke free generation on Saturday October 15.  The Knowsmoke Zombie Walk starts with check in at the L.C. Walker Arena at 2:00pm.  Get tobacco zombie-fied and learn to do the zombie walk and then take to the streets of downtown Muskegon.  After the zombies have terriorized the town, they will head back to Hackley Park for tobacco reduction related festivities.  From 3:30pm – 5:30pm there will be light treats, face painting, a flash-mob and music provided by DJ Wingman.  Prizes will be up for grabs for the best costume that displays the health hazards of tobacco use. Free t-shirts will be available to the first 100 zombies to register on Eventbrite.  Youth age 13 and under need to be accompanied by an adult.  No pets, roller blades, bicycles, smoking or weapons allowed for the safety of all participants.  For more information call 231-724-1263.

The MCA – Red Lotus Gallery Open Mic Night
October 15 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Muskegon Center for the Arts presents Open Mic Night at the Red Lotus Gallery, located in the Century Building, from 7:00pm – 9:00pm.  If you have a love for the stage and can perform an activity such as music, anything theatrical, poetry or readings, you may want to express it here or just show up to watch the show.  There is always something new and unique to enjoy.  This event happens on the third Saturday of every month and is for persons 18 years and older.  This is a free event.  For more information, call (231) 206-0426.

Free Family Movie Night: Monsters, Inc.
October 15 @ 7:00 pm
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Saturday, October 15 at 7:00pm, come to the Howmet Playhouse for the Free Family Movie Night film, “Monsters, Inc.”

This 2001 animated feature from the creators of Toy Story shows us the life behind the scenes of things that go bump in the night. The big, blue and fuzzy James P. Sullivan (John Goodman) and his opinionated, one-eyed roommate Mike Wzowski (Billy Crystal) are two professional “scare specialists”.  Their job is to harness the energy created when they make little kids scream.  This energy is bottled and keeps their society going.  When they accidentally let a young girl named Boo into their world behind the closets and under the beds, it throws their life into chaos. Boo finds out that the monsters are more scared of her than she is of them.  G (All Ages Admitted)

Free drinks and popcorn are included!  For more information, call 231-894-4048.

Performances @The Block: Audivi
October 15 @ 7:30 pm
Tickets: $20-$30, $10 Student tickets with ID
A professional vocal octet, Audivi focuses on presenting rarely heard Renaissance masterpieces and premiering new works by modern composers, as well as choral music from all eras.  Saturday, October 15 at 7:30pm, Audivi harkens back to a time when unaccompanied singing was considered the highest form of music in the world.  Its members have sung with professional vocal ensembles around the world and have appeared on the television program, America’s Got Talent.

Call Rita at 231-726-3231 x223 for tickets and more information.  Doors and bar open at 6:45pm, concert begins at 7:30pm.

Ruth and Max Bloomquist
October 16 @ 3:00 pm
Ruth and Max Bloomquist, Michigan’s favorite acoustic folk duo, will perform 3:00pm, Sunday October 16 at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church!  This free event is open to everyone.  Singer/songwriter Ruth Bloomquist performs her original songs along with folk, country and bluegrass favorites. Max backs her up with harmony and bass.  Together, they create a heart touching roots-based music that is all their own.  The Bloomquists appear frequently on NPR, concert stages and songwriting workshops.  Their Youtube hit “Michigan Girl” had 345,000 listeners.  This summer they performed in southern France and were featured artists at Michigan’s Double JJ Resort.  They released a live CD in 2012 and a Christmas EP in 2015.  A new release is in the works for 2016.  No tickets or reservations are required.  Refreshments follow the show.  For more information contact St. Gregory’s Church at 231-780-2955.