Author Archives: editor

Instructions for Participating in the March 30th Council and Budget Hearing 7pm

The Village Council meeting and Budget Public hearing will be held on Monday March 30th at 7pm. Due to the Governor’s Stay Home order it will be done as a teleconference call. To participate you will need to call 1-844-474-0925 and use a passcode of 57182580 followed by the # sign. The meeting will start at 7pm but the phone line will be open at 6:45pm to allow for you to join prior to the opening of the council meeting. Just like a regular meeting the public will be given an opportunity to talk during the Public Comment portion of the meeting. If possible please mute your phone if you participate and only unmute if you make a public comment. Thank you.

HealthWest ReCon Veteran Resilience Conference – May 28, 2020

HealthWest to host statewide ReCon Veteran Resilience Conference featuring former Detroit Lions QB Eric Hipple, military social worker April Thompson

The ReCon Veteran Resilience Conference will be returning to Downtown Muskegon on Thursday, May 28, for its third year of assisting military veterans, their families, and veteran service providers in developing the tools they need to lead resilient lives after leaving the military.

Resilience is one of the pillars to overcoming ongoing life challenges faced by veterans in their personal and professional post-military lives. Resilience is not a trait that people either have or do not have. It involves behaviors, thoughts, and actions that can be learned and developed by anyone.

The full-day conference will include keynote sessions, informative lectures, panel presentations, and resource fair. This year’s keynote presenters include former Detroit Lions quarterback Eric Hipple and military social worker April Thompson.

Breakout sessions will include discussions on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, suicide prevention, substance use, intimate partner violence, and more.

“We are excited to have two dynamic and engaging keynote presenters scheduled for this year’s conference,” said Doug Card, HealthWest’s veteran system navigator and chair of the ReCon planning committee. “This event will provide invaluable tools to military veterans, their families, and their supporters.”

ReCon, which began in 2018, has grown to include participants from across Michigan and even neighboring states. Since its beginning, ReCon has drawn more than 1,300 participants.

“You do not need to be a mental health professional to benefit from ReCon,” said Card. “Every participant can leave with the resources they need to face life’s obstacles head-on and develop the tools they need to live a healthier life.”

ReCon is organized by a team that includes mental health professionals, members of veteran service organizations, and military veterans.

About Eric Hipple
Since his 15-year-old son Jeff’s suicide, Hipple has devoted his life to building awareness and breaking down the stigma surrounding mental health. Hipple’s message of resilience has provided mental fitness awareness to professional groups, military, law enforcement, schools, communities and, through the Under the Helmet program, reached thousands of high schools and youth coaches across the country.

In conjunction with Navy’s U.S. Fleet Forces and PAC Fleet, he has provided workshops on suicide and destructive behavior prevention focusing on the Mental Fitness Program. He also established the After the Impact program, a neuro-behavioral residential treatment program serving military veterans and former NFL players.

About April Thompson
Thompson is working as a Military Behavioral Health Social Worker with the Center for Deployment Psychology (CDP) at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland. In this capacity, she is responsible for the development and delivery of both live and web-based training to military and civilian behavioral health providers on deployment-related topics.

For more than 20 years, Thompson has primarily worked with military couples and families in a wide range of settings, including on bases in Virginia, Florida, Hawaii and Japan. She has expertise in couples counseling, addressing the stresses associated with military life, as well as prevention and treatment of intimate partner violence and suicide.

During ReCon, Thompson will be presenting about incorporating families into clinical care to support veteran resilience.

ReCon Veteran Resilience Conference Details:
The ReCon Veteran Resilience Conference is being held on Thursday, May 28, from 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. (registration opens at 7:30 a.m.) at the Frauenthal Center in Downtown Muskegon. The conference is FREE to attend and includes a light breakfast and lunch. Veterans, their families, community members, veteran service providers, and anyone interested in supporting veterans or gaining skills to grow resilience are invited to attend. Social Work CEUs are being provided for a $25 fee. Participants can register at www.ReconEvent.org.

The ReCon Veteran Resilience Conference is being presented by HealthWest in partnership with the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services and Mercy Health. Additional sponsorship opportunities are still available by visiting www.ReconEvent.org

NASS Political Courage Award Given Posthumously to Viola Gregg Liuzzo of Michigan

Freedom March volunteer was killed by KKK in 1965, sparked change

nassaward

Photo L-R: Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, NASS President & Iowa Secre­tary of State Paul Pate, Mr. Dan Lilleboe, Ms. Mary Liuzzo Lilleboe and Ms. Ainka Jackson. Photo credit: Philip Smith.

Washington, D.C. — The National Association of Secretaries of State (NASS) has presented the 2019 Margaret Chase Smith American Democracy Award for political courage posthu­mously to Ms. Viola Gregg Liuzzo. During the Saturday, Feb. 1, ceremony, the award was accepted by Ms. Liuzzo’s daughter, Ms. Mary Liuzzo Lilleboe.

In 1965, Ms. Liuzzo, a 39-year-old white, middle-class mother of five living in Detroit, saw the gruesome footage of the Bloody Sunday attacks on voting rights protestors in Alabama. As a Wayne State University student and a member of the Detroit chapter of the NAACP, she participated in local protests after the first Freedom March, but felt com­pelled to do more. She answered Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s call to action and drove south to join the second wave of protestors.

Upon her arrival in Alabama, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference welcomed her help, and she was tasked with transporting volunteers and aid. On the final night of the Freedom March, she was shuttling volunteers between the cities of Selma and Montgomery along with Mr. Leroy Moton when the Ku Klux Klan (KKK) apprehended her car on the highway and fatally shot her.

As a martyr of the civil rights movement, Ms. Liuzzo’s death sparked change. In the days immediately following her murder, President Lyndon B. Johnson called for a Congressional investigation of the KKK, and the Klansmen who killed her were eventually convicted in court. The tragedy of her death also helped pave the way for the passage of the 1965 Vot­ing Rights Act just five months later.

“Viola Liuzzo lived a life of true heroism and courage and our democracy is better for it. The sacrifice she and her family made has inspired an entire generation to take up her cause and to ensure that no voice goes unheard and no vote goes uncounted,” said Michi­gan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson who nominated Ms. Liuzzo for the award.

Ask Dr. Universe – “Bears”

Why are bears called bears when they can be called anything else, not just a bear? – Natallia, 8, Yakima, Wash.

Dear Natallia,

You’ve noticed something very important: there’s no natural reason for the words humans use. Any sound could be used to describe a big mammal that eats berries and salmon.

But people who speak English choose “bear.” People who speak Spanish use “oso.” People who speak Maricopa say “maxwet.” They’re all different, but they’re all correct.

That’s what I learned from my friend Lynn Gordon, a linguist at Washington State University.

“Why do we call bears ‘bears’?” she said. “Because we’ve agreed to.”

Humans have a unique knack for speech. They talk about things in the past or future. They make up new words. They even say things they’ve never said before (like you did with your excellent question).

To be understood, speakers of a language agree about its rules. This happens very early, when a baby is first learning to talk. When you were little, you learned by listening to others. You agreed to your language’s rules without even thinking about it.

“Most of what we know about culture people didn’t teach us,” Gordon said. “They acted it out in front of us and we absorb it by being human. We’re driven to absorb the culture and language around us. Our brains are built that way.”

That’s how English speakers have passed down the word “bear” for generations. We don’t know exactly how or when the first word for bears was created. But linguists can hunt for a word’s history by looking at its relatives.

English, German, and Dutch are like cousins. English speakers say “bear,” Dutch speakers say “beer,” and Germans say “bär.” These languages sound similar because they share an ancestor – Proto-Germanic, an old language that isn’t spoken anymore.

Before “bear,” Old English speakers used “bera.” This word may come from the Proto-Germanic “*berô,” meaning “the brown one.” Others think “*berô” might be related to the Latin “ferus,” making it mean “the wild one.” We don’t have any written examples, so linguists use an asterisk (*) to show it’s their best guess.

Others look farther back at Proto-Indo-European, Proto-Germanic’s ancestor. This language had a different word for bears: “*rtko.” That’s where the Ancient Greek “arktos” and Latin “ursus” come from.

But how could “*rtko” become “*berô”? It’s possible people didn’t want to say a bear’s true name out loud, so they said “the brown one” or “the wild one.” People might have been afraid of warning bears they hunted, or calling bears to attack them.

That part of the history involves a lot of guessing. But it’s clear “*berô” became “bera,” and “bera” became “bear.”

All of this shows languages change over time. It’s normal for words to shift in sound and meaning. It’s even normal to create new words. Humans move around, meet new humans, and borrow words as they go. They agree to the rules, but the rules can change.

So whether you call me “cat” in English, “gato” in Italian, or “kedi” in Turkish, it’s all right by me.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Fruitport Township Board of Trustees AMENDED Meeting Agenda – 03/23/20

AGENDA
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP BOARD OF TRUSTEES
FRUITPORT TOWNSHIP HALL
5865 AIRLINE ROAD, FRUITPORT, MI 49415

MARCH 23, 2020

6:30 P.M. WORK SESSION
7:00 P.M. BOARD MEETING

01. Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States
02. Roll call
03. Approval of board minutes: 3/9/20
04. Approve / amend agenda
05. Correspondence / reports
06. Public comments regarding agenda items

07. Unfinished Business
A. 2020/2021 budget discussion
B. Budget Public Hearing
C. Adopt 2020/2021 budget
D. MCRC Local Road Project Contract

08. New Business
A. Banking and Investing Resolution
B. Budget amendments
C. Police Cruiser purchase
D. Senior Millage funds allocation

09. Approval of Bills
10. Reports
11. Public Comments
12. Adjournment

The Township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the following Township Clerk: Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Township Hall, 5865 Airline Road, Fruitport, MI 49415   (231) 865-3151

Grand Valley State University Fall 2019 Dean’s List

Grand Valley State University announces the names of students who were placed on the dean’s list for the Fall 2019 semester concluding in December. The list includes those students who have maintained a 3.5 grade point average and been enrolled in a minimum of 12 credits. The honor is noted on the students’ official records.

Students honored for the fall semester include:

Fruitport: Tyler A. Adams; Matthew C. Davidson; Jade N. Johnson; Allison M. Klimek; Brittany L. Preston; Emily E. Rosema; Hannah E. Shull; Paige D. Silva; Alexander D. Sinn

Muskegon: Courtney D. Bailey; Thomas R. Balaskovitz; Samuel J. Baustert; Coltrane L. Bodbyl-Mast; Lindsey A. Bos; Dareae E. Brown; Zackary J. Burdon; Alexis P. Carroll; Leiya L. Chronister; Anna L. Compton; Rylee P. Cooper; Kellie J. Crowell; McKenna G. Davis; Deja E. Dawkins; Elizabeth M. Doriot; Nicholas A. Duplissis; Samantha Eely; Breanna M. Frein; Gillian C. Garton-Borowicz; Karol P. Gasior; Erika L. Gill; Allison S. Goorman; Abigail M. Heminger; Ruth S. Hernandez; Tiffany M. Hill; Evan E. Hodson; Nicholas A. Hosler; Connor J. Inglat; Samuel B. Innis; Karmen R. Johnson; Madelynn F. Kelly; Riina Korhonen; Emerson E. Kruszka; Amanda L. Lauher-Smith; Matthew T. Leslie; Autumn J. Lindstrom; Shane M. Lucas; Zachary R. Manguem; Lauren L. Maus; Brooke L. May; Rosemary V. McCollom; Christy R. Mcfall; Antewnet G. Melton; Kaylynn C. Moschke; Meagan M. Moye; Victoria A. Mueller; Andrew L. Nance; Maddison R. Nyblade; Brendan S. Peterman; Joshua J. Pruitt; Caitria S. Rawdon; Hali M. Reed; Evan W. Rogalla; Amy M. Rogers; Blake A. Ross; Ariana J. Sherrod-Cavanaugh; Taylor K. Sherwood; Kaitlyn Siersema; William A. Silvey; Cade B. Snuffer; Jenna E. Stolzman; Autumn F. Storm-Moore; Trevor F. Tejchma; Stephanie Torres; Lindsie E. Traxler; Jayne E. VanderVelde; Jared R. Varnado; Kayanna S. Warfield; Hannah L. Weinrick; Noa B. Weller

Nunica: Jordyn N. Barding; Annemieke K. Engelsma; Caden J. Ercole; Alexandra N. Gemmen; Emma G. Jewell; Morgynn M. Reedy; Bailey E. Strasler; Alexandra M. Tober

Ravenna: Taylor A. Carlyle; Jessica R. Jerue; Jennifer Pelham; Gabrielle B. Postema; Marie L. Townsend

Spring Lake: Cameron J. Amaya; Carley E. Bench; Carsen D. Boyink; Alyssa C. Cabala; Hannah M. Cabala; Matthew D. Cassar; Julia E. Clover; Zakary J. Colvin; Sophia A. Conroy; Sarah C. Corgan; Joseph J. Cossey; Nicole R. Davis; Graydon D. Deal; Michael T. Farwig; Madeline J. Foster; Ryan G. Foster; Zachary C. Foster; Konnor A. French; Lauren R. Galloway; Jillian F. Garzelloni; Drew A. Henman; Christopher M. Hillman; Sabrina I. Hochhuth; Jared T. Hogan; Jillian C. Huizenga; Hannah R. Junglas; Arianna M. Kraljic; Nicholas J. Krueger; Jacob D. Kugler; Jared M. Lancaster; Charis G. Lunt; Miah L. Masvero; Emily E. May; Kenneth M. Moore; Olivia R. Nelson; Jack W. Ogden; Rylan L. Peets; Christian L. Pelke; Aaron T. Ponce; Brendan K. Price; Jillian J. Schnurstein; Veronica M. Schoemer; Justin D. Sterner; Dylan D. Styburski; Madison R. Terpstra; Paige N. Wilds; Brett A. Zenker

Fruitport Board of Education Regular Monthly Meeting Minutes – 03/16/20

Fruitport Board of Education
Regular Monthly Meeting
March 16, 2020 7:00 p.m.
Board Room

I. The Regular meeting of the Board of Education was called to order at 7:00 p.m. by Board President, Dave Hazekamp.

II. The PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE was recited.

III. ROLL CALL:  Present – Jill Brott, Elroy Buckner, Tim Burgess, Kris Cole, Susan Franklin, Dave Hazekamp, and Steve Kelly.

IV. APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Item 20-018.  MOTION by Franklin, SECOND by Brott to approve the agenda with the removal of item XIII-5 Overnight Trip Request.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

V. PRESENTATIONS
None.

VI. COMMUNICATIONS
Steve Kelly read aloud a note from Fruitport student, Kalli Lockhart, thanking the Board for supporting Michigan Youth in Government.  She appreciated the opportunity to see students from other areas come together and share their thoughts on bills.

Steve Kelly read aloud a note from Fruitport student, Christian Whipple, thanking the Board for supporting Michigan Youth in Government. He felt the conference was very beneficial and looks forward to going next year.

Steve Kelly read aloud a note from Fruitport student, Jillian Hawley, thanking the Board for supporting Michigan Youth in Government. She was excited to be able to attend the conference and looks forward to next year’s.

Steve Kelly read aloud a note from Fruitport student, Kennah VerMerris, thanking the Board for supporting Michigan Youth in Government. She feels the conference is extremely valuable and essential to our youth.

VII. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC
Jason D Kolkema addressed the Board announcing his candidacy for District Court Judge.

VIII. SUPERINTENDENT/ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS
Superintendent, Bob Szymoniak gave an update on the COVID-19 school closure and the action Fruitport Community Schools is taking during this suspension.  Meals will be prepared and distributed within our community, online learning will be encouraged, and hard surfaces/high touch areas will be cleaned thoroughly on a daily basis.  Buildings are scheduled to re-open on April 13th but the situation is very fluid and that date could change.  FCS will follow the directives of Gov. Whitmer.

IX. CONSENT AGENDA
Item 20-019.  MOTION by Brott, SECOND by Franklin to approve the Consent Agenda as listed below:
1.  Approval of Regular Meeting Minutes of February 17, 2020
2.  Acceptance of Bills, Monthly Financial Report, and ACH Transactions
3.  Acceptance of Student Activity Summary Report
4.  Acceptance of Credit Card and Utilities Report
5.  Approval of Capital Projects Progress Report
6.  Approval of the Personnel Report
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

X. GENERAL BOARD BUSINESS
1. School of Choice Resolution.
Item 20-020.  MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Cole to adopt the 2020-21 School of Choice Resolution as presented.
Roll call: Brott, Yes; Buckner, Yes; Burgess, Yes; Cole, Yes; Franklin, Yes; Hazekamp, Yes; Kelly, Yes.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

XI. BUSINESS AND FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Report of a committee meeting held March 9, 2020.
Elroy Buckner reported on a Business and Finance Committee meeting held March 9, 2020. Dave Hazekamp, Kris Cole, Elroy Buckner, Bob Szymoniak, Jessica Wiseman and Mark Mesbergen were present.  The committee discussed Football Helmets, a Budget Amendment, the Headlee Override Election, and Middle School Bid Pack #3.

2. Middle School Mechanical Improvements.
Item 20-021.  MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Franklin to authorize Owen-Ames-Kimball Co. to issue Letters of Intent, in the amount indicated, to contractors and suppliers listed per the attachment, pending confirmation that all requirements of the Contract Documents have been met.  Furthermore, that upon receipt by Owen-Ames-Kimball Co. of the appropriate documentation, contracts be awarded to these contractors and suppliers by Fruitport Community Schools.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

3. General Fund Budget Amendment Resolution.
Item 20-022.  MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Cole to adopt the General Fund Budget Amendment as presented.
Roll call: Brott, Yes; Buckner, Yes; Burgess, Yes; Cole, Yes; Franklin, Yes; Hazekamp, Yes; Kelly, Yes.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

XII. PERSONNEL COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Report of a committee meeting held March 9, 2020.
Steve Kelly reported on a Personnel Committee meeting held March 9, 2020. Dave Hazekamp, Steve Kelly, Tim Burgess, Bob Szymoniak, and Mark Mesbergen were present.  The committee discussed the Headlee Override Election, a Budget Amendment, possible changes to the 2020/21 Calendar, and the Excellence in Education program.

XIII. STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Report of a committee meeting held March 10, 2020.
Jill Brott reported on a Student Affairs Committee meeting held March 10, 2020. Dave Hazekamp, Susan Franklin, Jill Brott, Allison Camp, Ken Erny, Mark Mesbergen, and Bob Szymoniak were present.  The committee discussed a new High School PE Course, a Budget Amendment, the Headlee Override Election, Focus on Excellence, Middle School Athletic B Teams, the Marching Band Handbook, and Learning Corridor Furniture for the High School.

2. New High School Physical Education Course.
Item 20-023.  MOTION by Brott, SECOND by Kelly to approve the new high school course, Lifetime PE as presented.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

3. High School Marching Band Handbook.
Item 20-024.  MOTION by Brott, SECOND by Franklin to approve the updated Marching Band Handbook as presented.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

4. Middle School Athletic B Teams.
Item 20-025.  MOTION by Brott, SECOND by Franklin to approve the reinstatement of Middle School Athletic B Teams as presented.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

XIV. BOARD MEMBER REPORTS AND DISCUSSIONS
Dave Hazekamp was selected to represent the Fruitport Board of Education at the Annual MAISD Budget Review on April 30, 2020.  Elroy Buckner will serve as back-up.

XV. AGENDA ITEMS for FUTURE MEETINGS & SCHEDULING OF ANY SPECIAL MEETINGS
1. Business and Finance Committee will meet April 13, 2020 at 11:30 a.m.
2. Personnel Committee will meet April 14, 2020 at 6:00 p.m.
3. Student Affairs Committee will meet April 14, 2020 at 12:00 p.m.
4. A Board Workshop has been scheduled for April 27, 2020 at 6:00 p.m. in the Board Room.
5. MAISD 2020-21 Annual Budget Review will be held on April 30, 2020 at 5:30 p.m.

XVI. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC
Media Specialist, Pam Gustafson reported that staff did a great job handling the sudden suspension of school due to the Governor’s COVID-19 direction.  It was no small task getting students ready for 4 weeks off.  She is proud of Fruitport Community Schools!

XVII. ADJOURNMENT
Item 20-026.  MOTION by Buckner, SECOND by Brott to adjourn.
MOTION CARRIED 7-0

The meeting adjourned at 7:44 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,

Steve Kelly, Board Secretary
Maribeth Clarke, Recording Secretary

FCS – Student Affairs Committee Meeting Minutes – 03/10/20

Student Affairs Committee
Tuesday, March 10, 2020
12:00 p.m. ~ Superintendent’s Office
MEETING MINUTES

Attendance: Dave Hazekamp, Susan Franklin, Jill Brott, Allison Camp, Mark Mesbergen, Ken Erny, Bob Szymoniak

1. The new high school course, Lifetime PE was approved to be placed on the Board agenda for action.  This course previously received two affirmative reviews by Instructional Council.

2. Budget amendments were reviewed.

3. The date for the upcoming Headlee Override election was discussed.

4. Discussion was held on FCS’s Focus on Excellence.  An upcoming Board workshop will be held to address this matter further.

5. The reinstatement of middle school athletic B teams was discussed and will be placed on the Board agenda for action.

6. The proposed Fruitport High School Marching Band handbook was presented and will be placed on the Board agenda for action.

7. Discussion was held on learning corridor furniture at the high school and whether parents had access to what books students check out from our libraries.

Meeting adjourned at 12:45 p.m.
Respectfully submitted by Bob Szymoniak

FCS – Personnel Committee Meeting Minutes – 03/09/20

Personnel Committee
Monday, March 9, 2020
5:30 p.m. ~ Superintendent’s Office
MEETING MINUTES

Attendance:  Dave Hazekamp, Steve Kelly, Tim Burgess, Mark Mesbergen, Bob Szymoniak

1. An update was given on budget amendments.

2. Putting the Headlee Override ballot issue on the November, 2020 election date was discussed.

3. A brief calendar update was given.  The need for calendar change was prompted due to calendar changes coming from the ISD.  We are currently in negotiations with the FEA for possible changes for the 2020/21 school year.

4. Discussion was held on the Excellence in Education program.

Meeting adjourned at 6:05 p.m.
Respectfully submitted by Bob Szymoniak

FCS – Business and Finance Committee Meeting Minutes – 03/09/20

Business and Finance Committee
Monday, March 09, 2020
4:30 p.m., Superintendent’s Office
Meeting Minutes

Attendance: Dave Hazekamp, Elroy Buckner, Kris Cole, Bob Szymoniak, Jessica Wisman and Mark Mesbergen

1. Football Helmets
Mark discussed the football helmets that Fruitport is currently leasing. The current company is going to be potentially sold so Mark is working with Thrun Law Firm to determine if there is anything we would have to do.

2. Budget Amendment
Jessica and Mark talked about the general fund budget amendment. The unassigned deficit increased from $480,598 to $589,556. The ending fund balance for the general fund would be $2,172,535 which is 6.93% of expenditures.

3. Headlee Override Election
Mark discussed the recently released budget from the Governor. The budget is the first step in the budget process for the State of Michigan. The House and Senate will be releasing their budget shortly and that is when Fruitport will determine the assumptions to use for the 2021 fiscal year.

4. Middle School Bid Pack #3
Mark and Bob presented OAK’s recommendation for the three bid categories for the Middle School water pipe project. The total cost of the project is estimated at $654,257 which includes the three bid categories, fees and contingency.

Meeting adjourned at 5:24 p.m.
Respectfully submitted by Mark Mesbergen

Fruitport Charter Township Board of Trustees Meeting Minutes of February 24, 2020

A work session of the Fruitport Charter Township Board began at 6:30pm on Monday, February 24, 2020, in the township board room.

Members Present:  Heidi Tice, Supervisor; Andrea Anderson, Clerk; Rose Dillon, Treasurer; Trustees Greg Hulka, Terry Knoll, Denise Winebarger
Members Absent: Jeff Jacobs, excused

At 7:00pm, Heidi Tice opened the regular meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance followed by a prayer.

Also Present: 8- residents; 2- employees; 0- guests; Director of Public Utilities, Steve Biesiada; Director of Public Safety, Brian Michelli; Attorney, Ron Bultje.

The motion by Rose Dillon, supported by Heidi Tice, was carried unanimously, to approve the minutes of February 10, 2020 as presented.

The motion by Andrea Anderson, supported by Terry Knoll, was carried unanimously, to approve the agenda as presented.

CORRESPONDENCE / REPORTS
1. Steve Biesiada reported that there has been a delay in the valve replacement in the Smiley water tower.
2. Brian Michelli shared that the charity basketball game with the Fire Department, Norton Shores Fire Department, and No More Sidelines will be this Friday.
3. Heidi Tice shared that the Lion’s Club pancake dinner will also be this Friday.

PUBLIC COMMENTS REGARDING AGENDA ITEMS:
1. Jason Kolkema introduced himself as a candidate running for District Court Judge.
2. Daniel Taber requested that additional funding be put toward the repair of Kendra Road.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS:

20-024 Brian Michelli contract renewal
Requested changes include a 3% salary increase and changes in regards to insurance including vision reimbursement and an additional 4 years of health insurance coverage for his spouse beyond his reaching Medicare eligible age post-retirement should he change his retirement age from 55 to 58.

Heidi Tice moved, Terry Knoll seconded, MOTION FAILED, to increase the salary of the Public Safety Director, Brian Michelli, 3% to $96,871.50, and approve the requested insurance changes, and extend his contract with changes as presented for one year.
Ayes: Knoll, Tice, Dillon
Nays:  Anderson, Winebarger, Hulka

Rose Dillon moved, Andrea Anderson seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to increase the salary of the Public Safety Director, Brian Michelli, 3% to $96,871.50, and approve the addition of vision reimbursement, and extend his contract with the amended changes for one year.
Ayes: Knoll, Anderson, Dillon, Winebarger, Hulka
Nays: Tice

20-025 2020/2021 Budget discussion
Discussion occurred regarding the proposed 2020/2021 budget.  The Budget Public Hearing will be scheduled for March 23, 2020.

NEW BUSINESS:

20-026 Adopt Public Meeting Schedule
The motion by Rose Dillon, seconded by Terry Knoll, was carried unanimously, to adopt the Schedule of Public Meetings for fiscal year 2020/2021.
Ayes: Hulka, Winebarger, Dillon, Tice, Anderson, Knoll
Nays: none

20-027 Payment of bills
Terry Knoll moved, Greg Hulka seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to approve bills as presented for payment in the following amounts:  General Fund $24,090.14; Public Safety $6,710.84; Water $1,279.97; Sewer $775.69; Street Lights $648.16
Totaling: $33,504.80
Ayes: Knoll, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger, Hulka
Nays: none

ADDITIONAL REPORTS:
1. Heidi Tice reported that commercial properties do not have to come before the Board of Review before going to the Tax Tribunal.

PUBLIC COMMENTS PART II:
1. Daniel Taber inquired as to when the budget will be available for public inspection.  He was provided a draft copy of the 2020/2021 budget.
2. Rick Tice suggested that a representative from the Parks Department should be present to present their budget request as the other departments do.

The motion by Greg Hulka, supported by Denise Winebarger, was carried unanimously, to adjourn the meeting at 8:05pm.

ANDREA ANDERSON, CLERK
HEIDI TICE, SUPERVISOR

Fruitport Township Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda – 03/23/20

AGENDA
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP BOARD OF TRUSTEES
FRUITPORT TOWNSHIP HALL
5865 AIRLINE ROAD, FRUITPORT, MI 49415

MARCH 23, 2020

6:30 P.M.  WORK SESSION
7:00 P.M.   BOARD MEETING

01.   Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States
02.   Roll call
03.   Approval of board minutes: 3/9/20
04.   Approve / amend agenda
05.   Correspondence / reports
06.   Public comments regarding agenda items

07.  Unfinished Business
A. 2020/2021 budget discussion
B. Budget Public Hearing
C. Adopt 2020/2021 budget
D. MCRC Local Road Project Contract

08.  New Business
A. Banking and Investing Resolution
B. Budget amendments
C. Senior Millage funds allocation

09.  Approval of Bills
10.  Reports
11.  Public Comments
12.  Adjournment

The Township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the following Township Clerk:  Andrea Anderson, Fruitport  Township Hall, 5865 Airline Road, Fruitport, MI 49415   (231) 865-3151

New Self-service Stations Offer Customer Transactions in English, Spanish or Arabic

LANSING – The new, dependable and easy-to-use self-service stations being installed across the state to replace old, unreliable and frequently malfunctioning Secretary of State kiosks offer another technological advantage: the option for customers to complete their transactions in English, Spanish or Arabic.

The new self-service stations, 60 of which have been installed since Oct. 27, were initially programmed for English and Spanish. They received a software update Dec. 13 that added the Arabic language option. To date, more than 75,000 registration renewal transactions have been completed in English, more than 450 in Spanish and more than 70 in Arabic.

“We are committed to improving customer experience for everyone who interacts with our department,” said Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson. “We’ve heard the call from communities for better language access, and plan to continue translating additional documents in the future.”

Since Secretary Benson took office, the department has taken steps to make more translations available. Documents now offered in Spanish and Arabic include:
Independent Citizens Redistricting Commission application
Driver’s license and ID card application
Driver’s license and ID requirements checklist

Foreign language-speaking community representatives with suggestions on additional documents that would be helpful to translate can contact the Office of Communications at 517-335-3264 or SOS-News@Michigan.gov.

The self-service station upgrade project is replacing all 93 of the department’s outmoded kiosks by the end of January and adding 57 more, for a total of 150, by the end of April. In addition to Secretary of State branch offices, many of the new stations will be in grocery stores such as Kroger and Meijer, meeting customers where they already are doing business. Customers can find an up-to-date list of locations at Michigan.gov/SOSSelfService.

Temporary Prohibition on Large Assemblages and Events, Temporary School Closures – Executive Order

An Executive Order from Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer – “Temporary prohibition on large assemblages and events, temporary school closures” – issued March 16, 2020.

Click the image or link below to view the full .pdf file of the executive order to find out more information on this important response to COVID-19.
https://content.govdelivery.com/attachments/MIEOG/2020/03/16/file_attachments/1402579/EO%202020-11%20Emergency%20Order%20-%20Assemblages%20.pdf

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Temporary Restrictions on the Use of Places of Public Accommodation – Executive Order

An Executive Order from Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer – “Temporary restrictions on the use of places of public accommodation” – issued March 16, 2020.

Click the image or link below to view the full .pdf file of the executive order to find out more information on this important response to COVID-19.
https://content.govdelivery.com/attachments/MIEOG/2020/03/16/file_attachments/1401753/EO%202020-9.pdf

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Fruitport Township Planning Commission Meeting Agenda – 03/17/20

AGENDA

PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP
5865 AIRLINE RD
FRUITPORT, MI 49415

March 17, 2020
6:30 Work session
7:00 PM BOARD MEETING

Work Session
Continue review of Ordinances starting at Sec. 42-273

BOARD MEETING
01. Roll Call
02. Approval of Planning Commission Minutes: February 18, 2020
03. Approve / Amend Agenda
04. Correspondence / Reports
05. Public Comments pertaining to agenda topics

New Business
06. Site Plan – 3443 Farr Road – Fruitport Family Medicine
Parcel – 61-15-125-300-0014-00
Purpose – Addition and new parking

Old Business
07. Public Comments
08. Adjournment

~

The township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the Township Clerk:
Andrea Anderson
Fruitport Charter Township
5865 Airline Rd, Fruitport, MI 49415
(231) 865-3151.

Bumstead Supported Bills Restoring Many of the Governor’s Budget Cuts

from Michigan State Senator Jon Bumstead’s Legislative Update

Last October, the governor vetoed nearly $1 billion from the budget, cutting critical funding for law enforcement, hospitals, local governments, college students, children in charter and rural schools, and more. The governor also used a rarely used administrative board to transfer an additional $625 million in funding.

These cuts hurt Michigan families and communities across the state, which is why I supported legislation to restore much of the critical funding that was vetoed or transferred by the governor.

Senate Bills 152 and 154 restored a total of $573.5 million of the governor’s nearly $950 million in vetoed funding and $625 million in administrative transfer funding.

Additionally, in the wake of the governor’s cuts and funding transfers, I supported legislation to make important reforms to the budget process that will preserve reliability and oversight and restore balance in the funding transfer process.

These bills were signed by the governor on Dec. 31 with immediate effect.

Ask Dr. Universe – Fingerprints

Dr. Universe: Why do people have different fingerprints? – Mary, 12, South Carolina

Dear Mary,

Did you know even identical twins have different fingerprints? It can be hard to tell twins apart, but a close look at their fingertips can reveal who’s who. The reason lies partly in their genes, but mostly from the unique way everyone’s skin grows before birth.

That’s what I learned from my friend David M. Conley, a professor at Washington State University’s Elson S. Floyd College of Medicine.

“The reason fingerprints are unique is the same reason individual humans are unique,” Conley said. “Variation is the norm, not the exception.”

There’s no single cause for your unique fingerprint design. Instead, it’s the result of both your genes and your environment. This is called multifactorial inheritance.

Look closely at the lines on your fingertips. These are called “friction ridges.” It’s hard to see, but they actually stick up above the rest of the skin.

“Fingerprints are impressions left behind when your fingers touch a glass, or when you put ink on your fingers and press them on a piece of paper,” Conley said. “Friction ridges are the actual patterns on your fingertips and palms.”

Friction ridges grow in different designs, like arches or whorls. If your parents’ fingers have a certain pattern, you might be likely to have it too. That’s because genes give the basic design, and you get your genes from your parents.

Genes are like instructions written inside the body. They give directions things like eye color, nose shape, and more. (Or, if you’re a cat like me, the length of your fur or the number of toes you have.)

Genes also tell the skin how and when to grow. Before a baby is born, they grow as a fetus inside their mother’s womb. The dermis (the inside skin layer) and epidermis (the outside skin layer) grow together. Friction ridges appear where these layers meet, guided by genes.

But these layers don’t grow at the same speed for every fetus. If one layer of cells grows faster, it can stretch and pull the others. As the fetus moves, their fingers can rub against the side of the womb.

These tiny forces push the skin as it grows. Together, they mold the direction of the growing ridges. The result is a unique fingerprint unlike anyone else’s.

Everyone’s skin grows in a slightly different environment. That’s why it’s so unlikely anyone has the same fingerprints as you – about a 1 in 64 billion chance.

Koalas and chimpanzees have unique fingerprints, too. Like humans, their hands and feet are covered in friction ridges. They also spend a lot of time climbing trees, just like humans’ primate ancestors did millions of years ago. That might mean friction ridges give texture to grab rough or slippery things.

Scientists don’t know yet if cats have different pawprints. But have you ever looked at the bumps on a cat’s nose? Some scientists think cats might have unique noseprints. I’m going to go check that out in the mirror later.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Fruitport Board of Education Meeting Agenda – 03/16/20

Fruitport Community Schools
BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING
Board Room
3255 E. Pontaluna Rd, Fruitport, MI 49415
Monday, March 16, 2020 – 7:00 p.m.

I. CALL to ORDER

II. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

III. ROLL CALL

IV. APPROVAL OF AGENDA

V. PRESENTATIONS

VI. COMMUNICATIONS

VII. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC*

VIII. SUPERINTENDENT/ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS

IX. CONSENT AGENDA
1. Approval of Regular Meeting Minutes of February 17, 2020 (attachment IX-1)
2. Approval of Bills (attachment IX-2)
General Fund                        $177,909.52
Other Funds:
Early Childhood Center             2,709.35
Food Service                              88,609.99
Coop Ed (ISD) Tech Millage       1,875.00
Capital Projects (Bond)            79,023.46
Total Bill List                       $350,127.32

3. Acceptance of Monthly Financial Report and ACH Transactions (attachment IX-3)
4. Acceptance of Student Activity Summary Report (attachment IX-4)
5. Acceptance of Credit Card and Utilities Report (attachment IX-5)
6. Approval of Capital Projects Progress Report (attachment IX-6)
7. Approval of Personnel Report (includes confirmation of new hires, resignations, retirees, and transfers) (attachment IX-7)

X. GENERAL BOARD BUSINESS
1. Schools of Choice Resolution (attachment X-1)

XI. BUSINESS & FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Elroy Buckner, Chairperson
1. Report of Committee Meeting held March 9, 2020 (attachment XI-1)
2. Middle School Mechanical Improvements (attachment XI-2)
3. General Fund Budget Amendment Resolution (attachment XI-3)

XII. PERSONNEL COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Steve Kelly, Chairperson
1. Report of Committee Meeting held March 9, 2020 (attachment XII-1)

XIII. STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Jill Brott, Chairperson
1. Report of Committee Meeting held March 10, 2020 (attachment XIII-1)
2. New High School Physical Education Course (attachment XIII-2)
3. High School Marching Band Handbook (attachment XIII-3)
4. Middle School Athletic B Teams (attachment XIII-4)
5. Overnight Trip Request (attachment XIII-5)

XIV. BOARD MEMBER REPORTS AND DISCUSSIONS
1. Select a board member and alternate to attend the MAISD Annual Budget Review

XV. AGENDA ITEMS FOR FUTURE MEETINGS & SCHEDULING OF SPECIAL MEETINGS
2. Schedule Business & Finance Committee Meeting
3. Schedule Personnel Committee Meeting
4. Schedule Student Affairs Committee Meeting
5. Schedule a Board Workshop
6. MAISD 2020-21 Annual Budget Review – Thursday, April 30, 2020

XVI. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC*

XVII. ADJOURNMENT

~

** There will be a tour of the high school immediately following the board meeting for all who may be interested.

~

*Time is provided for members of the audience to address the Board of Education regarding any topic including items on the agenda. The board is providing two opportunities for the public to comment during the meeting. The first is for people who wish to bring issues to the Board of Education for board consideration. At the end of the meeting the board will provide a brief opportunity for community members to comment on activities and/or discussion that took place during the board meeting. Time limits may be placed if a large number of individuals would like to address the board.

Bill Introduced to Allow Abortion Pill Reversal Information

On January 22, 2020, the 47th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, House Bill 5374 was introduced in the Michigan Legislature. This bill will ensure women who are prescribed the abortion pill are given information about the abortion pill reversal protocol. The bill’s lead sponsor is Representative Beth Griffin.

The abortion pill reversal protocol has been successful in saving the lives of more than 900 unborn children whose mothers regret beginning the abortion pill process. A recent study from the doctors pioneering the process showed it is effective up to 68 percent of the time.

The abortion pill regimen first uses RU-486 (mifepristone) to break down the connection between the baby and mother’s womb. 24 to 48 hours later, a second pill, misoprostol (cytotec), is given to induce contractions and expel the baby. The abortion pill reversal protocol uses the hormone progesterone to reverse the effects of RU-486, which is a progesterone blocker.

Progesterone is a common medical treatment used to prevent miscarriage and is effective in reversing abortion process after the first pill has been taken. Even without the progesterone, there is a small chance the baby would survive if the woman does not take the second pill. Once the second pill has been taken, however, the progesterone treatment would not be effective in reversing the abortion.

An unethical study led by abortion supporters was initiated in 2019 to criticize the abortion pill reversal process. The study was suspended because the participants had negative reactions to the abortion pill itself, but they implied the suspension was because of the effects of the progesterone treatment.

Despite the dangers of the abortion pill, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration expanded the official range for using it up to 10 weeks of gestation. The need for available information about the abortion pill reversal protocol is even greater, because with the continuing increase in women using the abortion pill there will also be an increase in women regretting their decision.

This bill is entirely about informed consent—giving women information the abortion pill reversal protocol. Informed consent should be something that abortion supporters agree with in theory, since they claim to support every woman’s choice. However, in practice, the abortion industry opposes this bill because one of their motives is protecting the money they make from abortions. To protect their own bottom line, they refuse to admit that abortion regret is even a possibility.

Chris Gast
Director of Communication/Education
(616) 532-2300 | RTL.org

Lakeshore Art Festival Wins Best Art Fairs Award

Muskegon, MI – Lakeshore Art Festival is a winner in the 8th annual “America’s Best Art Fair Awards” competition.  The national survey from Art Fair Calendar recognized Lakeshore Art Festival as one of the finest juried art fairs in the country.

Sponsored by ArtFairCalendar.com, the #1 website for art fair event listings, the 2019 online survey opened voting beyond the traditional “art fair insiders” such as artists and show staff to focus on voting by art fair patrons, fine art collectors and the public that attends art shows and festivals nationwide.

“The Lakeshore Art Festival has always been popular among art fair lovers in the Muskegon area, but our 8th annual national Best Art Fairs Awards survey proves that both art collectors and artists nationwide love it, too,” said Connie Mettler, Publisher of ArtFairCalendar.com. “We’re happy to give an ‘America’s Best Art Fair Award’ to the Lakeshore Art Festival today.”

“We are so thrilled to be the only Michigan festival to make the top 10 list!” said Carla Flanders, Lakeshore Art Festival Director. “Standing alongside art festival greats from Chicago to Park City. This recognition by our patrons and artists, not only boosts our local pride but it shines a light on the Muskegon Lakeshore area on a national scale.”

Major sponsors for the Lakeshore Art Festival include: DTE Energy Foundation, Michigan Council for Arts & Cultural Affairs, Leaf Filter, PADNOS and Envigor.

Sponsorship opportunities are available at www.lakeshoreartfestival.org.

Village of Fruitport Council Meeting Minutes – 02/17/20

VILLAGE OF FRUITPORT
COUNCIL MEETING
FEBRUARY 17TH, 2020

1. Call to Order
President Roger Vanderstelt called the meeting to order at 7pm

2. Pledge

3. Prayer

4. Roll call
Present: Roger Vanderstelt, Donna Pope, Amy Haack, Carl Rothenberger, Jeff Guiles and Ann LaCroix
Absent: Jay Bolt and Will Overkamp (excused).

5. Approval February 17th Council Meeting Agenda
Motion made by Amy to approve the agenda with the addition of Senior Millage under New Business, supported by Roger. With a unanimous vote the motion carried.

6. Approval of February 10th Budget meeting minutes
Motion made by Amy to approve the meeting minutes, supported by Carl. With a unanimous vote the motion carried.

7. Public Comment
Pat Stressman from the Lions Club requested use of Pomona Park for the annual Easter Egg hunt on April 11, 2020 and Old-Fashioned Days from May 18 – 26th, 2020. Motion made by Roger to approve the Easter egg hunt request, supported by Carl. With a unanimous vote the motion carried. Motion made by Roger to approve the request for Old Fashioned Days, supported by Carl. With a unanimous vote the motion carried.

8. Correspondence
None

9. Report from Officers
Donna had nothing to report.
Jeff had nothing to report.
Carl had nothing to report.
Amy will report under the agenda items.
Roger reported that 2nd Street has been completed. The DPW will inspect it prior to payment being made. Roger advised that the roof has a couple of leaks in it. Quotes will be obtained for the repair of the roof. The new address has been installed on the library entrance. Larger DPW direction signs have been ordered.

10. Master Plan Update
Ann advised as a follow up to the last Master Plan Update Roger asked her to contact David Jirousek regarding a logo for the Village. David advised that he has two people that he can talk to about it and to provide options. He’d like to receive input on the theme for the logo. Amy said that she is meeting with a graphic designer to work on a logo for her place of employment. Amy will check with that representative too about a Village logo.

11. 2020 3rd Avenue Project
Roger advised that Prein & Newhof are working on the Traffic Signal design. Amy advised that the request for the additional $46,000.00 of federal funds needs to be requested by the Village at the next WMSRDC Technical meeting.

12. 5th and Beech
Council reviewed the 3 bids. Motion made by Carl to accept the bid of $26,007.72 from Tiles Excavating with costs split between the Major and Local Street funds, supported by Donna.
Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Guiles and Vanderstelt
NAYS: None
Absent: Bolt and Overkamp.

13. Kayak Launch
Amy reviewed the Scope of Services from Prein & Newhof.
Motion made by Amy to approve the scope of service from Prein & Newhof not to exceed $26,000.00 once the Project agreement has been received from the DNR, supported by Jeff.
Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Guiles and Vanderstelt
NAYS: None
Absent: Bolt and Overkamp.
Amy advised that the high water levels may affect the construction timeline. She will continue to work on the project.

14. 7th & Peach Repair
Roger advised that he is waiting on the 3rd bid to be received and will report back at the next council meeting.

15. Bridge Street Repair
Roger advised one bid has been received and working on two additional bids for the work.

16. Senior Millage
Amy gave an overview of the Senior Millage that was passed a few years ago. The Muskegon County Board of Commissioners passed a resolution in November to allocate up to 25% of the annual senior millage funds to local municipalities. The Village would receive $3500.00 in Base Funding and $3607.00 in Senior Funding. The municipalities need to submit a 1 -2-page plan to receive the funding. We can work with an existing agency or partner with another municipality. Amy suggested that the funds be used for a parking lot next to the bandshell for Dancing into Sunset and other events in the Park. Commissioner Lahring was in attendance and asked that the Village not duplicate something already in process. He would support the Parking Lot idea. Amy advised that the Lions Club will contribute to the costs and she will contact Heidi Tice at Fruitport Township to discuss a partnership for the Senior Millage.

17. Public Comment
None

18. Warrants
Motion made by Jeff to approve the warrants, supported by Amy.
Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Guiles and Vanderstelt
NAYS: None
Absent: Bolt and Overkamp.

19. Adjournment
Motion made by Donna to adjourn the meeting at 7:44pm, supported by Carl. With a unanimous vote the motion carried.

Respectfully submitted by,

Ann LaCroix
Clerk

Senate Unanimously Approves Bumstead Legislation to Grow Michigan Beer Industry

from Michigan State Senator Jon Bumstead’s Legislative Update

The state Senate approved legislation I introduced that would create a new license for a limited production of a beer in a 37-0 vote.

This is big news for La Colombe, Norton Shores and breweries across the state. La Colombe picked a site in Norton Shores to house their operations in 2015 and have made great strides in the years since. They employ over 100 people, provide a high-demand service and are always looking at ways to grow their company and give back to the community.

La Colombe, a coffee company with a manufacturing facility in Norton Shores, teamed up with Miller Coors to develop the “La Colombe Hard Brew Coffee.” La Colombe purchased a bulk beer product from out of state and blended the beer with its coffee. It was later brought to the company’s attention by the Michigan Liquor Control Commission (MLCC) that the state does not expressly permit makers to transfer beer from one brewery to another or further process beer that was initially made by another brewery — which then forced La Colombe into a gray area that could have meant legal troubles for the company.

The MLCC later granted La Colombe a one-time exception to complete the order they had already invested time and resources in. That exception is set to expire in April.

After several discussions with company leaders and MLCC representatives, I introduced Senate Bill 711, which would give companies like La Colombe the ability to receive a license that would allow beer to be imported and further manufactured in their facility. The legislation outlines additional guidelines for such collaborations.

With the pending change in state law, La Colombe is already looking at ways to expand their operations in West Michigan over locations in other states. This means more jobs and more growth in the Norton Shores Community. We need to keep Michigan moving forward and create an environment for businesses to call home. This legislation gets government out of the way and will benefit companies across the state.

SB 711 has been sent to the Michigan House of Representatives.

Muskegon County Calendar of Events 03/09/20 – 03/16/20

Presented by the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau
www.visitmuskegon.org

Victorian Secrets
March 9 @ 6:00 pm
Monday, March 9 at 6:00pm, come to the North Muskegon Library for “Victorian Secrets!”  Historical interpreter, Wendy Batchelder, will show you the hidden language of the Victorians.  Discover obsolete forms of communication from 100 years ago or more.  Learn about charming Victorian customs that used flowers and fans to express sentiments, good tidings, or regrets.  See beautiful antique calling cards, fans, autograph books, and more.  Make your own “tussie-mussie” flower bouquet or decorate a beautiful silk fan. Call 231-744-6080 to register for this free event.

Ardan Academy at Hackley Public library
March 9 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Monday, March 9 from 6:30pm – 7:30pm, come to Hackley Public Library to join the dancers from Ardan Academy as they kick off the St. Patrick’s festivities with an Irish dance performance.  This event is free and open to the public.  For more information call (231) 722-8000.

St. Patrick’s Celebration Line Up 2020
March 10 – March 17
Tuesday – Tuesday, March 10 – 17, Hennessy’s Irish Pub invites you to their annual St. Patrick’s Celebration!  Enjoy Irish food, Irish drink specials, live music, a Costume Parade Contest, giveaways and prizes!  www.hennessyspub.com/st-patrick-s-celebration

Tuesday, March 10
• 7:00pm – Whiskey School/St. Patrick’s Irish Whiskeys
Reserve Here: https://www.hennessyspub.com/event-reservations

Wednesday, March 11
• 6:30pm – Cocktails & Canvas/St. Patrick Gnome
Reserve Here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1350269498504436/

Saturday, March 14 – Saturday St. Patrick’s Celebration
• 11:00am – St. Patrick’s Day Parade
• 11:00am – Downtown Muskegon St. Patrick’s Day Pub Crawl
• 12:00pm – Steeple Hill
• 3:00pm – Irish Bag Pipers
• 4:00pm – Bucket O Maybe’s
• 8:30pm – Costume Pub Parade
• 9:00pm – Costume Contest
• 9:00pm – Conklin Ceili Band

Monday, March 16
• 6:30pm – Honor St. Patrick Fundraiser with Guest Bartender Father Matt
More Information: https://www.facebook.com/events/509257426387500/

Tuesday, March 17 – St. Patrick’s Day Celebration
• 12:00pm – 47 Annual Irish Flag Raising
• 12:00pm – David McIntire
• 3:00pm – Guinness Glass Engraving
• 4:00pm – Uneven Ground
• 9:00pm – Legal Rehab
—————————————
Costume Contest Prizes
• 1st Place:  $50.00 Gift Card, 2 Tickets to Whiskey School, Swag Bag
• 2nd Place:  $20 Gift Card, 2 Tickets to Whiskey School, Swag Bag
• 3rd Place:  $10 Gift Card, Swag Bag

2020 Global Awareness Festival: Caribbean
March 9 – 12 @ 10:30 am – 12:30 pm
The 20th Annual MCC Global Awareness Festival will look at the geology, ecology and culture in the Caribbean with lectures and cuisine on March 9-12, 2020. The events, which are free and open to the public, take place on the MCC main campus.

Each year, the Global Awareness Festival highlights a different geographic area of the world. Flags representing approximately 200 nations are displayed in the main campus hallways. For more information, call (231) 777-0380 or e-mail Jennifer Jones, chair of the MCC Social Sciences Department, at jennifer.jones@muskegoncc.edu.

Tuesday, March 10 from 10:30am – 11:30am, explore “The Impact of Climate Change on the Caribbean” with presenter Amber Kumpf, Geology/Oceanography Instructor, Muskegon Community College in the Blue and Gold Room:  The Caribbean is home to some of the most beautiful reefs in the world, of which 99 percent are expected to die at two degrees Celsius of warming. This alone will have a huge impact on the economy and livelihood of islanders. Other climate-related hazards, like sea level rise, changes in weather patterns, and expansion of disease ranges, are of concern, too. What can we do to mitigate some of the impacts? How are the conversations about disaster preparedness different and similar between the Caribbean and the Midwest?

The “2020 Global Awareness Festival Poster Award Winners” will be presented by Dr. Dale Nesbary, President, Muskegon Community College in the Blue and Gold Room from 11:45am – 12:15pm.  Awards will be presented to the first, second and third place posters created by the MCC Graphic Design students competing for their work to chosen as the official poster for this year’s festival. Brenna Snippe won first place, Barrimore Lee took second place honors, and Daniel Rosema had the third place entry.

North Grove Brewers: Paint your Pet
March 10 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Tuesday, March 10 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm, join North Grove Brewers and the Arts Council of White Lake to “Paint your Pet” with the Jaeger Foundation!  Join instructor Casey Bemis to create a painting of your pet.  When you register you will be asked to email a picture of your pet to nuveen@artswhitelake.org by March 3.  Your submitted photo will be pre-drawn onto a canvas ready for finishing touches the day of the event.  Images may be cropped to best fit the canvas.  For tips on choosing the best photo, visit https://www.artswhitelake.org/pet-painting-photo-suggestions.

Enjoy some yummy food and tasty beverages while painting with friends!  The cost is $40 and a portion of your ticket will go to the Jaeger Foundation, which provides funding, resources, and education for veterans and first responders to assist them in securing a service dog.  Registration is required by visit www.artswhitelake.org/events-1/paint-your-pet-4.  For more information call the Arts Council at (231) 893-2524.

We Are Stars
March 10 & 12 @ 7:00 pm
Come to the Carr-Fles Planetarium at Muskegon Community College for the free show, “We Are Stars!”  What are we made of? Where did it all come from?  Explore the secrets of our cosmic chemistry and our explosive origins.  Connect life on Earth to the evolution of the Universe by following the formation of Hydrogen atoms to the synthesis of Carbon, and the molecules for life.  Narrated by Andy Serkis.  This is a 35-minute presentation.  For more information call 231-777-0289.

Lunch n’ Learn: Introducing Sujari Britt
March 11 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Wednesday, March 11 from 12:00pm – 1:00pm, come to The Block for “Lunch n’ Learn: Introducing Sujari Britt!”  West Michigan Symphony presents a brown bag lunch and conversation about Masterworks.3:  Introducing Sujari Britt.  Bring your own lunch and enjoy an hour of lively discussion with Music Director Scott Speck and a special guest.

Those who have tickets to attend the associated West Michigan Symphony masterworks concert on Friday, March 13 will get a primer to the works that will be presented, and for those who don’t, tickets will be available to purchase.

Samples of the repertoire will be played and discussed, including:
• Florence Price: Dances in the Canebrakes
• Saint-Saëns: Cello Concerto no. 1
• William Grant Still: Symphony no. 1 “Afro-American”

This is a free event.  Doors open at 11:45am to give you time to mingle and take your seats.  Coffee and water will be provided.  Food will be available for purchase at area restaurants such as Subway (next door) and Rebel Pies (downstairs in the back of Unruly Brewing).  If you have any questions or would like more information, please call 231-726-3231.

Burl & Sprig: Comedy Night
March 11 @ 8:30 pm
Wednesday, March 11 at 8:30pm, come to Burl and Sprig Distillery in downtown Muskegon for Comedy Night, hosted by Fresh Ghost Comedy!  Enjoy live stand-up from comedians Jason Hagel and Dave Wellfare.  For more information call (231) 760-6769.

Seussical the Musical
March 12 – March 14
March 12 – 14, come to the Beardsley Theater as Artios Academies of Grand Haven presents “Seussical the Musical!  The Cat in the Hat tells the story of Horton, an elephant that discovers a speck of dust containing Whos, including Jojo, a Who child sent off to military school for thinking too many “thinks.”  Horton faces a double challenge – not only must he protect the Whos from a world of naysayers and dangers, but he must guard an abandoned egg, left to his care by the irresponsible Mayzie La Bird.  Although Horton faces ridicule, danger, kidnapping, and a trial, the intrepid Gertrude McFuzz never loses faith in him. Ultimately, the powers of friendship, loyalty, family, and community are challenged and emerge triumphantly.

Tickets are $10 advance or $12.00 at the door.  For more information call the box office at 231-727-8001.

Showtimes:
• March 12, 2020 – 7:00pm
• March 13, 2020 – 7:00pm
• March 14, 2020 – 2:00pm & 7:00pm

Book Talk: Author Yancey Strickler
March 12 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Thursday, March 12 from 5:30pm – 7:00pm, come to Hackley Public Library for a Book Talk with Author Yancey Strickler!  A writer and entrepreneur, Yancey Strickler is the co-founder and former CEO of Kickstarter, and the author of “This Could Be Our Future: A Manifesto for a More Generous World,” which the Wall Street Journal called “consciousness-raising.”  He also co-founded the artist resource The Creative Independent and the record label eMusic Selects.  Yancey has been recognized as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum and one of Fast Company’s Most Creative People.  He has spoken at the Museum of Modern Art, Sundance and Tribeca Film Festivals, Web Summit, MIT, and events around the globe, with the London Spectator calling him “one of the least obnoxious tech evangelists ever.”  Yancey began his career as a music critic in New York City, and grew up on a farm in Clover Hollow, Virginia.  This event is free to the public.  For more information call (231) 722-8000.

St. Patrick’s Party
March 13 – March 14
The Michigan Irish Music Festival is excited to announce its annual St. Patrick’s Party March 13 and 14 at Bella Maria’s Ristorante & Event Center!  The party will feature live entertainment both nights. The Kreellers, an energetic Celtic Rock group hailing from Detroit, is an unstoppable powerhouse steeped in traditional Irish sound. The band’s mix of rock, funk, and punk elements has created a sound that is sure to keep patrons rocking all night!

Other highlights of the event include performances by local favorites the Oat Bran Boys, an acoustic trio of bluegrass and Irish music, and traditional Irish dance performances from the Ardan Academy of Dance.  Additionally, the silent auction returns both nights with several new exciting formats and ways to bid on the variety of items.

Back by popular demand is McGovern’s Corned Beef and Irish fare, plus Irish soda bread and soft pretzels from the Village Baker.  Pigeon Hill Brewing Company’s MI Irish Stout, Magner’s Irish Cider, Irish cream, Jameson Irish Whiskey, and Budweiser products will also be served. Doors open at 5:30pm both nights with music starting at 6:00pm. Tickets are available at the door for $8, and kids 12 and under get in for free.

The mission of the Michigan Irish Music Festival is to produce a quality Midwest Irish Music Festival that promotes Irish culture and heritage while enhancing the community through entertainment, tourism, education and philanthropy. The festival is proud to support Loaves & Fishes Food Pantry and Kids’ Food Basket with gifts of non-perishable food items and cash donations.  Since 2008, due to the success of the St. Pat’s Party and the Festival, the Michigan Irish Music Festival has donated over $266,000 in cash and 21,000 pounds of food back to the community.  The Michigan Irish Music Festival will return this fall, September 17-20, 2020, at Heritage Landing in downtown Muskegon.  For more information call (231) 683-2065 or visit www.michiganirish.org.

Muskegon Home, Garden + DIY Show
March 13 & 14
Friday and Saturday, March 13 and 14, come to Fricano Place for the Muskegon Home, Garden + DIY Show!  There’ll be over 50 exhibitors featured, including everything you need for do-it-yourself home projects like windows, siding, gutters, painting, home décor, furniture, landscaping and much more!  Back by popular demand, the Do-It-Yourself and Demonstration seminars will highlight floral design, furniture refurbishing, gardening and more!  Admission is $5 for ages 13 and older.  For more information call (231) 722-3751.

The Alley Door Club
March 13 @ 6:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Celebrating its’ 15th season, The Alley Door Club at the Frauenthal Center  kicks off January 10, 2020 with live performances from an array of local bands!  Performing on select Friday nights through April, The Alley Door Club features live music from popular West Michigan bands in a fun environment which includes a cash bar and dancing in the Ballroom located on the 3rd Floor of the Hilt Building.  The doors open at 6:00pm for Happy Hour ($1 off all drinks), with live music from 7:00pm – 10:00pm.

The 2020 Alley Door Club performance schedule is as follows:
• March 13 – Brena (Rock)
• March 27 – The Steeple Hill Band
• April 10 – Yard Sale Underwear (The Self-proclaimed King of Polyester, Pop & Soul)
• April 24 – Big Daddy Fox & Friends

Tickets are $10 per person.  Tables may be reserved at $75.00 for a 4-top or $115.00 for an 8-top.   For more information, call the Box Office at 231-727-8001.

Reception: Power of the Feminine Show
March 13 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
The “Power of the Feminine Show” takes place at City Center Arts March 10 – April 13!  Friday, March 13 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm, there will be a free public reception.  In honor of International Women’s Day, the Power of the Feminine show conveys how remarkable women have shaped the globe since the beginning of human civilization.

10% of their sales from this show will go to Every Woman’s Place in Muskegon.  Every Woman’s Place strengthens families in Muskegon County and provides services for victims and survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking.  For more information call (231) 260-6697.

Kids Night Out:  St. Patrick’s Day
March 13 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Friday, March 13 from 6:30pm – 9:00pm, MCC Lakeshore Fitness Center presents “Kids Night Out:  St. Patrick’s Day!”  Parents can enjoy shopping, working, exercising, or a night in during this Kid’s Night Out event geared toward children 3 – 11 years old.  Rest assured, knowing your children are in a safe environment and having an awesome time with the youth programs staff at the Lakeshore Fitness Center.  Bring your little ones to spend the evening with them at their St. Patrick’s Day event.  The cost is $15 for members for the first child and $7 for each additional child.  For non-members, the price is $20 for the first child and $12 for each additional child.  For more information call (231) 722-9322.

Muskegon Lumberjacks Home Games
March 13 & 14 @ 7:00 pm
The Muskegon Lumberjacks are proud and dedicated members of the United States Hockey League (USHL), the nation’s only Tier I junior hockey league and leading producer of NCAA players and National Hockey League draft picks in the United States. Catch home games Friday, March 13 and Saturday, March 14 at 7:05pm at the L.C. Walker Arena as they take on the Sioux City Musketeers.  Friday, it’s “Jacks Fight Cancer Night,” and Saturday is “13 On Your Side Night!” Tickets range from $10 – $17.  For more information call (231) 724-5225.

West Michigan Symphony: Introducing Sujari Britt
March 13 @ 7:30 pm
Friday, March 13 at 7:30pm, come to the Frauenthal Theater as the West Michigan Symphony presents Sujari Britt, the 17-year-old cello sensation who has been featured on The Today Show and NBC TheGrio’s “100 History Makers in the Making.” The Symphony no. 1 of William Grant Still—“The Dean of African American composers”—is widely regarded as one of the great American symphonies of all time.

• Florence Price: Dances in the Canebrakes
• Saint-Saëns: Cello Concerto no. 1
• William Grant Still: Symphony no. 1 “Afro-American”

Tickets are $12 for students and $25 – $62 for adults. For more information, call the box office at 231-727-8001.

Shamrock Shuffle 5k
March 14 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am
Saturday, March 14 from 9:00am – 10:30am, meet the folks from Run Muskegon at Fricano’s Muskegon Lake for the “Shamrock Shuffle 5k!”  Registration is now open for this fun St. Patrick’s Day event.  For all of the information, or to sign up, visit www.runsignup.com/Race/MI/Muskegon/SSuffle5K.  The 5k race course is listed online at www.runmkg.com.

Most Unruly St. Paddy’s Party
March 14 @ 9:00 am – 11:30 pm
Saturday, March 14 from 9:00am – 11:30pm, it’s a Most Unruly St. Paddy’s Party at Unruly Brewing Company featuring The TossPints, The Barley Saints and more!  There is no cover charge and all ages are welcome.  For more information, call (231) 288-1068.

Schedule:
• 9:00am: – Taproom opens pre-parade so you can stay warm, grab a pint, and hang out before the show

Immediately after the parade – Enjoy the Muskegon Regional Police Pipes & Drums and meet the Irish Wolf Hounds in the Beer Garden

• 1:00pm – 4:00pm:  Barley Saints
• 4:00pm – 5:00pm:  Ardan Dancers
• 5:30pm – 7:30pm:  Mona Shores Fiddlers
• 7:30pm – 9:30pm:  Irish Trivia / Scavenger Hunt
• 9:30pm to 12:30am – The triumphant return of the TossPints

Spring Thaw Open House
March 14 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Saturday, March 14, Torresen Marine invites you to their 40th Annual Spring Thaw Open House!  Attention sailors!  This will be one of their most exciting events yet!  Visit with product representatives, enjoy refreshments, take advantage of great pricing, see new products, attend free seminars and speak with experts from both educational and governmental organizations doing marine research and making great strides in understanding and utilizing our lakes.

Register in their Grand Prize drawing to win a B&G Vulcan 7 chartplotter.  Tickets to register to win will be handed out by attending seminars, participating in activities, taking photo booth pictures and tagging on social media and qualified purchases.  For more information call (231) 759-8596.

Green Eggs & Ham Benefit Breakfast
March 14 @ 10:00 am
Saturday, March 14 at 10:00am, come to the Greater Muskegon Woman’s Club for a breakfast of Green Eggs & Ham!  The ladies are celebrating Reading Month and Dr. Seuss’ birthday with a delicious breakfast including free Dr. Seuss books and a visit from one of his marvelous characters!  The requested donation is $15 for 1 adult + 1 child.  Add $5 for each additional person in the family.  Call Nancy Bierenga to make your reservation at 231-730-0887 or e-mail nancy@housesbynancy.com.

Bookworm Super Saturday
March 14 @ 10:00 am – 3:00 pm
March 14 from 10:00am – 3:00pm, bring the family to the Muskegon Museum of Art for a Bookworm Super Saturday!  March is reading month, so march on down to the MMA for this bookworm themed free family fun day.  For more information call 231-720-2570.

• 10:00am & 1:00pm: Family Film
• 11:00am – 1:00pm: Tour the “20 for 20: Celebrating Michigan Illustrators” exhibition with an MMA docent
• 11:00am – 2:00pm: Make and take craft in the classroom

Muskegon’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade
March 14 @ 11:00 am
Saturday, March 14, the Annual Muskegon’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade is stepping off at 11:00am from 4th St. and Clay Ave. and marching east along Clay to Jefferson St.  Families, organizations, fraternal groups, businesses, marching bands, churches and schools are invited to join in the fun and march in this exciting event! Sponsor your “clan” and walk the parade route or design a float and ride through downtown Muskegon along “O’Clay Street!”  The only cost to march in the parade or sponsor a float is a non-perishable food donation.  The Greater Muskegon JCI “Cart Corps” will perform along the parade route, accepting food donations from the parade crowd and entertaining the assembled masses with their synchronized grocery cart maneuvers!  For more information, call 231-412-0705.

Fish Class: Sliders
March 14 @ 11:00 am – 2:00 pm
Saturday, March 14 from 11:00am – 2:00pm, join the Fish Monger’s Wife for the Fish Class: Sliders!  Do you want to eat more fish but aren’t sure how to cook it?  Fish Class removes “fish fear” from the cooking process with a lively fish dish cooking demo, sampling and take home recipe.  In March’s Fish Class, ground fish will be used in place of beef to make burgers.  Each person will sample three sliders with three different toppings.  Gluten free options are available upon request.  Tickets are $15 and available online or at the Fish Market.  For more information call 231-755-1600.

Green Machine Lighting Install Demo & St. Patrick’s Day Lunch
March 14 @ 11:00 am – 3:00 pm
Saturday, March 14 from 11:00am – 3:00pm, come to Hot Rod Harley-Davidson for the Green Machine Lighting Install Demo & St. Patrick’s Day Lunch!  They have installed the Rockford Fosgate Audio system on their 2020 Vivid Black Road Glide, and now they are going to install some green LED lights on it!  Come in and watch their techs turn this Road Glide into a glowing GREEN MACHINE!

In honor of St. Patrick’s Day, they will also have Irish Stew, Cornbread and Mini Reuben Sandwiches!  For more information call (231) 722-0000.

St Patrick’s Day Downtown Muskegon Pub Crawl
March 14 @ 1:00 pm – Midnight
Saturday, March 14 from 1:00pm – midnight, come to Downtown Muskegon for a night of fun to celebrate the way the Irish do!  For more information call (231) 724-3180.

Participating Establishments…so far:
• 18th Amendment Spirits Co.
• 794 Kitchen&Bar
• BoomTown Market
• Burl and Sprig
• Hennessy’s Pub
• Mike’s Inn
• Pigeon Hill Brewing Company
• Racquets Downtown Grill
• Tipsy Toad Tavern
• Top Shelf Pizza & Pub
• Unruly Brewing

Bird Talk
March 14 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Saturday, March 14 from 1:00pm – 3:00pm, come to the Lakeshore Museum Center for the program “Bird Talk!”  Meet in the Habitat Gallery downstairs to learn how birds can tell us that spring is coming!  After identifying some local songbirds, you can create a bird book of your own to take home.  The program will repeat every 20 minutes.  For more information call (231) 722-0278.

Sujuri Britt, classical cello @TheBlock
March 14 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Saturday, March 14 from 7:30pm – 9:30pm come to The Block for “Sujuri Britt, classical cello!” On the heels of her West Michigan Symphony debut, the sensational 17-year-old Sujari Britt will fill The Block with the warmth and power of Bach, Brahms and Shostakovitch on her 1718 Neuner-Hornsteiner cello.  Tickets are $25 – $35.  Students are $10.  For more information call (231) 726-3231.

Live Music @ Next Door: Fremont John
March 14 @ 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Saturday, March 14 from 8:00pm – 11:00pm, come to the Next Door restaurant to relax and enjoy some craft cocktails, wood-fired pizzas and live music from Fremont John!  For more information call (231) 375-5185.  Check out their upcoming events at www.NextDoorMKG.com.

Free Family Movie Series
March 15 @ 3:00 pm
The Frauenthal Center presents a “Free Family Movie Series” for 2020!  This new family-friendly entertainment series features 11 free family movies beginning in February and running through December of 2020!  Showcasing modern box office hits, the series aims to encourage families in the community to experience the Frauenthal Center and enjoy a free and fun afternoon. Sunday, March 15 it’s “Maleficent: Mistress of Evil!”  These events are free and no tickets are required.  All movies will begin at 3:00pm with the doors opening at 2:15pm.  For more information call 231-727-8001.

Staged Reading: “Molly and I”
March 15 @ 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Sunday, March 15 from 3:00pm – 6:00pm, come to The Playhouse at White Lake for Staged Reading: “Molly and I!”  The newly re-formed White Lake Dramatic Club, a group of community actors, directors, and technicians, is pleased to present a staged reading of Frank R. Adams original 1912 play, “Molly and I”.  The original, type-written script was gifted to the Playhouse by Pete Damm.  Adams was a prolific writer of movies, books and songs and was an essential part of getting the Playhouse built in 1916.

A romantic comedy, the play tells the story of a wealthy heiress who must marry by a certain date in order to secure her fortune.  With the help of a friend, she places an advertisement for a husband who she will never see after they are married, as she wants to live life on her own.  Like many of his works, the story was told in the form of a book, a play and a film.

This is the first of three staged readings the Club will be performing.  Upcoming dates are April 25 at 7:30pm and May 10 at 3:00pm.  Membership in the Club is open to anyone interested in community theatre.  Donations will be accepted at the door.  For more information call (231) 894-4048.

Ask Dr. Universe – Sea Turtles

Why won’t a female sea turtle lay her eggs in the ocean? How do baby turtles know where the ocean is when they hatch from their eggs? – Jasmine and Shereen, 8, Gainesville, Fla.

Dear Jasmine and Shereen,

Sea turtles spend almost their entire lives in the ocean. Even as babies, sea turtles’ bodies have special traits for living at sea, helping them glide and paddle through the water. After emerging from their eggs, baby sea turtles (called “hatchlings”) scramble to the ocean to live the rest of their lives. Only female sea turtles return to land as adults, to lay eggs and begin the cycle again.

I talked with my friend Frank Paladino to learn more about sea turtles. He completed his Ph.D. at Washington State University. Today he is a professor at Purdue University-Fort Wayne and former president of the International Sea Turtle Society. He is especially interested in leatherbacks, the largest living turtle.

I learned that a female sea turtle must return to the beach to lay eggs, even though she is most comfortable in the ocean. This is because her eggs can only survive on land.

Baby sea turtles breathe through their eggs before hatching. Oxygen passes through the eggshell and membrane, a thin barrier surrounding the turtle. Even buried in sand, the turtle can still breathe through the egg. But they cannot breathe if the egg is in the water.

Sea turtle eggs also need warm temperatures to grow properly. Beaches provide the right conditions to help eggs develop. Mother sea turtles bury their group of eggs (called a “clutch”) in sandy nests to protect them until they are ready to hatch.

But when lots of humans are around, a beach can be a difficult place to lay eggs. “Normally, female turtles do not lay their eggs in the water. But if disturbed when on the beach and distracted multiple nights from returning to the nest, they will dump their clutch in the ocean,” Paladino said.

Humans can also cause problems for hatchlings as they leave the nest and head toward the ocean.

To find the ocean, hatchlings follow the brightest light source. Have you ever noticed how a pond or lake sparkles in the sun? This is because light bounces off the surface of the water. Under natural conditions, the ocean is brighter than the beach because it reflects light from the sun and the moon.

But when humans are around, other light sources can confuse turtle hatchlings. “Lights from houses and hotels on turtle beaches distract them. Instead of going to the sea, they will head toward the house lights which are the brightest horizon,” Paladino said.

Light pollution can be dangerous for hatchlings, so some places have created rules to protect them. Paladino told me that turtle nesting beaches in Florida have shields to block human sources of light. There are even special street lights designed not to confuse hatchlings looking for the ocean.

Sea turtles follow their instincts, in a cycle that takes them from the land to the ocean. Although humans pose challenges to sea turtles, science can help them live alongside each other.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Fruitport Township Board Meeting Agenda – 03/09/20

AGENDA
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP BOARD OF TRUSTEES
FRUITPORT TOWNSHIP HALL
5865 AIRLINE ROAD, FRUITPORT, MI 49415

MARCH 9, 2020

6:30 P.M. WORK SESSION
7:00 P.M. BOARD MEETING

01. Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States
02. Roll call
03. Approval of board minutes: 2/24/20
04. Approve / amend agenda
05. Correspondence / reports
06. Public comments regarding agenda items

07. Unfinished Business
A. 2020/2021 budget discussion

08. New Business
A. 2020 Brine Program approval
B. Budget amendments
C. Fuel Management System Agreement

09. Approval of Bills
10. Reports
11. Public Comments
12. Adjournment

The Township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the following Township Clerk: Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Township Hall, 5865 Airline Road, Fruitport, MI 49415 (231) 865-3151

State of the State

sosYour Chamber President, Cindy Larsen attended her first “State of the State” address in Lansing this month. She thought it was an honor to be the guest of Senator Jon Bumstead who made it possible for her and White Lake Chamber President, Amy Vanloon to be there. “Meeting many state officials in one afternoon was fascinating and fun!” said Larsen. “It was impressive to see Senator Bumstead and his team in action working for our community.”

Cissie Graham Lynch Inspires Listeners to Stand Boldly for God’s Truth Through “Fearless” Podcast

cissieIn June 2019, Cissie Graham Lynch, daughter of Franklin Graham and granddaughter of Billy Graham, launched her podcast titled Fearless with Cissie Graham Lynch: Fearless Faith in a Compromising Culture. Each episode features a discussion of relevant issues in culture such as abortion, addiction, balancing life, politics and more, and provides insight on what the Bible teaches about these topics.

Today, Graham Lynch continues to encourage listeners to stand boldly for the Gospel of Jesus Christ in an ever-compromising world. “One of the most important lessons I learned from my parents and my grandparents was to never compromise my beliefs because of what the world says,” said Graham Lynch. “I want to help people navigate these tough issues and to give them practical ways to live out their faith in truth and love and to be unapologetic and fearless in a world that is forever compromising.”

The podcast features a variety of guests, including Graham Lynch’s father Franklin Graham, her husband and former NFL player Corey Lynch, J. Warner Wallace, and, most recently, Adrienne Camp.

Fearless is available for streaming and download through SoundCloud, Apple Podcasts and other podcast players, and can be streamed directly at CissieGrahamLynch.com. Listeners can also follow Facebook.com/BillyGrahamRadio for regular updates and programs.

~

If you would like more information about these, or other, ministries of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, please contact media@billygraham.org. Complete press releases from the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association are available at media.billygraham.org.

Muskegon County Calendar of Events 03/02/20 – 03/09/20

Presented by the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau
www.visitmuskegon.org

PINTwood Derby Competition
March 2
Join Pigeon Hill in the taproom for their first ever PINTwood Derby Competition!  This event is to bring out the kid in all of us, so get competitive, grab a beer and challenge your friends to the PINTwood Derby!  They will have Derby Build-It Nights and practice runs Monday nights in March, as well as the first 2 Mondays in April. The big PINTwood Derby Competition will be April 18 at 1:00pm.  Get all the details at Pigeon Hill’s Facebook page.

My Vietnam Tour
March 2 @ 6:00 pm
Monday, March 2 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm, the USS Silversides Submarine Museum invites you to join them for the Monday night lecture by Mike Robinson, “My Vietnam Tour.”  Robinson centers on how writing his memoirs about Vietnam helped him.  For more information call (231) 755-1230.

Classical Night: Kyle Thompson
March 3 @ 6:00 pm
Tuesday, March 3 from 7:00pm – 9:00pm, come to the Book Nook & Java Shop for Classical Night featuring Kyle Thompson on guitar.  The cover is $5.  Come early for dinner at 6:15pm to enjoy Chicken Cacciatore (parmesan-crusted chicken breast, linguine, and tomato sauce), broccoli, a glass of house wine, and Afogatto for $17.  For more information call 231-894-5333.

Live at the Library: Just Us
March 3 @ 6:30 pm
Tuesday, March 3 at 6:30pm, come to the North Muskegon Library for the vocal sextet, Just Us!  They will provide a treat for your ears and your soul with beautiful melodies, sweet harmony, and a heavenly blend of voices. Light refreshments will be provided at this free event.  For more information call (231) 744-6080.

Traditional Irish Music Session
March 3 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
The first Tuesday of every month from 7:00pm – 9:00pm, Hennessy’s Irish Pub invites you to join them for a Traditional Irish Music Session!  Whether a beginner or an advanced session player, bring your Irish musical instrument and participate in this merry band of Irish session players.  Even if you don’t play, come and listen!  For more information call (231) 728-3333.

Aromatherapy Meditation for Seniors
March 4 @ 2:00 pm
The first Wednesday of the month at 2:00pm, Ravenna Public Library invites you to join them as you learn how to use both aromatherapy and meditation for inner peace.  For more information call 231-853-6975.

Art Talks Back Poetry Contest
March 5
Michigan writers are invited to create original ekphrastis poems based on one of the ten selected works of art from the Muskegon Museum of Art’s permanent collection in this year’s Art Talks Back Poetry contest. The contest is open through March 26, 2020. This competition and event is free and open to the public. Find competition guidelines, selected artworks, and the required entry form at www.muskegonartmuseum.org. The winning poets will be awarded and their poetry read on April 30 at 6:00pm. Prior to the award ceremony, beginning at 5:00pm, a reception will be held in the galleries.  The First-Place award is sponsored by The Poetry Society of Michigan.  For more information call 231-720-2570.

Hackley Attic Escape Room
March 6 @ 5:00 pm
Friday, March 6 at 5:00pm and 7:00pm, experience the Hackley House like never before with the “Hackley Attic Escape Room!”  For many years, the attic of the Hackley House has been a mysterious place for visitors.  Now it is up to you and your closest friends to escape a Victorian storage room filled with puzzles, locks, and riddles.  Brush up on your Muskegon history and escape the attic in 80 minutes!  Tickets are $15 for museum members and $20 for non-members.  Space is limited to 10 people per session. Please RSVP via Eventbrite.com or contact Erin Schmitz at 231-724-5535 or erin@lakeshoremuseum.org.

Community Swim Family Fun Nights
March 6 @ 5:30 pm
The MCC Lakeshore Fitness Center invites you to bring your floats and pool toys to hang out and play games in the 25-meter lap pool!  Family Fun Nights in the pool are a new way to spend quality time with your loved ones, plus, on Flick & Float nights, they’ll play a family-friendly movie to add to the fun.
Community Swim Family Fun Nights happen every other Friday, March 6 – June 26 at 5:30pm.  These events are free for members or only $2 for non-members.  For more information, please visit the Member Service Desk or call 231-722-9322.

Chef Tim O’s No-Cook Fridays
March 6 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
The Book Nook & Java Shop invites you to join them for comfort food to start your weekend with chef and bartender Tim O’Connell’s ‘No Cook Fridays!’  The cost is only $10 to enjoy great food, live music and a full bar.  Dinner is at 6:00pm and the music begins at 7:00pm.  For more information, call 231-894-5333.
• March 6 – Greek style, Lemon Chicken, herbs & potatoes
• March 13 – Slow Cooker Beef Stroganoff, Egg Noodles
• March 17 – Murder mystery dinner, Corn beef, Cabbage & Boiled potatoes
• March 20 – ?

The Ride 2020
March 7 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Saturday, March 7 from 9:00am – 1:00pm, Mercy Health invites you to join “The Ride 2020” at the Mercy Health Arena (formerly the L.C. Walker Arena)!  Whether you are a serious cyclist or a casual biker, The Ride has a spot for you and your team.  All participants will receive a commemorative gift and refreshments.
Anyone may form a team of eight members.  Your team of eight cyclists will ride bikes mounted on trainers for 25 minute intervals and compete for team trophies and individual medals.  Prizes are awarded for various categories, ranging from most mileage ridden to most spirited team.  The entry fee is $400 per team, or $50 per rider.  The entry fee for a Youth Team is $200 per team or $25 per rider.  Some teams ask area businesses to help sponsor their teams.  For more information, contact Megan Akselberg, Annual Gifts and Events Coordinator, at 231-672-6976 or Megan.Akselberg@mercyhealth.com.

Read Early. Read Often. Family Birthday Party
March 7 @ 10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Saturday, March 7 from 10:00am – 12:00pm, come to the Watermark 920 for the “Read Early. Read Often. Family Birthday Party!”  Happy 6th birthday, Read Early. Read Often. This free event, presented by Muskegon County’s Great Start Collaborative and Parent Coalition and MILakeshoreKids.com is in honor of National Reading Month and is especially suited to families with small children.
There is free admission as well a free giveaways.  Also, each organization will host a sensory activity, craft or interactive item at their table that corresponds to a children’s literary character or book.  There will be no selling products or services at this event.  For questions, contact Kristy at milakeshorekids@gmail.com.

Art, Eat, Educate with Christie Dreese at Art Cats Gallery
March 7 @ 11:00 am – 12:30 pm
Saturday, March 7 from 11:00am – 12:30pm, Art Cats Gallery invites you to “Art, Eat, Educate with Christie Dreese!”  Do you ever wonder how an artist gets a certain effect?  How they get inspired?  What makes them tick?  Join local artist Christie Dreese as she discusses her work, her inspirations and her vision as she demonstrates her oil painting technique.  Enjoy treats from an area restaurant and learn about art.  For more information call (231) 755-7606.

Astronomical Spring vs Real Spring
March 7 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Saturday, March 7 from 1:00pm – 3:00pm, the Lakeshore Museum Center invites you to the program “Astronomical Spring vs Real Spring!”  What is astronomical spring?  What weather signs do we look for to know that spring is coming?  Visit the museum to learn the science behind spring weather and build a Rain Stick.  Lessons are every 30 minutes in the auditorium.  This event is $5, or free to Muskegon County residents and museum members at this walk-in, open-house style event.  For more information call 231-722-0278.

Swing Dance Class at Hackley Library
March 7 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Saturday, March 7 at 2:00pm, come to Hackley Library for a Swing Dance Class!  Do you love to dance or wish to learn how to swing dance?  Master the moves from Muskegon Area Dance Lovers (MADLOS) during this free swing dance class!  There is no need to have a partner for this fun program.  To register, call 231-722-8011, stop into Hackley Library, or visit the events calendar at hackleylibrary.org.

Reclaiming Rake
March 7 @ 5:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Saturday, March 7 from 5:00pm – 9:00pm, Reclaim Source and Rake Beer Project invite you to join them at Rake Beer Project for a party celebrating their new reclaimed wooden bar-top!  There will be live music, an art gallery, free food, a secret free giveaway (while supplies last), and a kick-ass raffle!  There’ll be over $4000 in prizes!  The entire Reclaim Source team will be there and they’d love to see you and have a beer!  For more information, e-mail rakebeerproject@gmail.com.

Muskegon Risers Home Game
March 7 @ 7:00 pm
Saturday, March 7 from 7:15pm – 9:15pm, come to the L. C. Walker Arena for the fifth home game of MKG’s 2019/20 arena season. They’ll take on Kalamazoo FC!  Season and single game tickets are available at www.muskegonrisers.com/mens-arena-tickets.

Bohemian Rhapsody Sing-a-Long
March 7 @ 7:30 pm
Saturday, March 7 at 7:30pm, the Playhouse at White Lake presents a Bohemian Rhapsody Sing-a-Long!  The Friends of the Playhouse invite you to a foot-stomping celebration and sing-a-long with last year’s Academy Awards Best Picture nominee!  Freddie Mercury defied stereotypes and shattered convention to become one of the world’s most beloved entertainers.  The film traces the rise of the band through their iconic songs, their near-implosion as Mercury’s lifestyle spirals out of control and their triumphant reunion on the eve of Live Aid, where Mercury, facing a life-threatening illness, leads the band in one of the greatest performances in the history of rock music.
This film is rated PG13 and stars Golden Globe® winner Rami Malek!  Tickets are $10 + $1 ticketing fee with all proceeds benefiting the Playhouse.  You are invited, even encouraged, to come in costume!  For more information call (231) 894-4048.

Matt Gabriel @ Next Door
March 7 @ 8:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Saturday, March 7 from 8:00pm – 11:00pm, come to the Next Door restaurant to relax and enjoy some craft cocktails, wood-fired pizzas and live music from Matt Gabriel!  For more information call (231) 375-5185.  Check out their upcoming events at www.NextDoorMKG.com.

Back Alley Comedy Club: Jordan Garnett
March 7 @ 8:00 pm
Saturday, March 7 at 8:00pm, come to the Back Alley Comedy Club for live stand-up from comedian Jordan Garnett!   Tickets are $7 in advance through Eventbrite.com or $10 at the door.  For more information call (616) 570-8765.

Comedy Night: Carl Johnson
March 7 @ 9:00 pm
Saturday, March 7 from 9:00pm – 10:30pm, come to Smash Wine Bar & Bistro for Comedy Night featuring Carl Johnson!   Carl is a Detroit area favorite who has opened up for Steve-O from Jackass, Matt Braunger, Mark Normand, and many more.  There’s no cover charge, but reservations are recommended.   For more information call (231) 246-7910.

2020 Global Awareness Festival: Caribbean
March 9 @ 10:30 am – 11:30 am
The 20th Annual MCC Global Awareness Festival will look at the geology, ecology and culture in the Caribbean with lectures and cuisine on March 9-12, 2020. The events, which are free and open to the public, take place on the Muskegon Community College main campus.  Each year, the Global Awareness Festival highlights a different geographic area of the world. Flags representing approximately 200 nations are displayed in the main campus hallways. For more information, call (231) 777-0380 or e-mail Jennifer Jones, chair of the MCC Social Sciences Department, at jennifer.jones@muskegoncc.edu.
Monday, March 9 from 10:30am – 11:30am, it’s “Earthquakes & Volcanic Eruptions of the Caribbean” presented by Olivia Bradin, Student, Muskegon Community College in the Blue and Gold Room:  The Caribbean Islands are located in a geologically volatile setting. While the Caribbean can be a beautiful vacation destination, it is also important to be aware of local hazards and what to do in case you find yourself in harm’s way. Come to this talk to learn more about the geology of the Caribbean.

Victorian Secrets
March 9 @ 6:00 pm
Monday, March 9 at 6:00pm, come to the North Muskegon Library for “Victorian Secrets!”  Historical interpreter, Wendy Batchelder, will show you the hidden language of the Victorians.  Discover obsolete forms of communication from 100 years ago or more.  Learn about charming Victorian customs that used flowers and fans to express sentiments, good tidings, or regrets.  See beautiful antique calling cards, fans, autograph books, and more.  Make your own “tussie-mussie” flower bouquet or decorate a beautiful silk fan. Call 231-744-6080 to register for this free event.

Ardan Academy at Hackley Public library
March 9 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Monday, March 9 from 6:30pm – 7:30pm, come to Hackley Public Library to join the dancers from Ardan Academy as they kick off the St. Patrick’s festivities with an Irish dance performance.  This event is free and open to the public.  For more information call (231) 722-8000.

Ask Dr. Universe – Why the Wind Blows

Dr. Universe: Why does the wind blow? – Odin, 7, Mt. Vernon, Wash.

Dear Odin,

When the wind blows, it can do all kinds of things. It can help pick up tiny seeds and carry them away, so plants and flowers can grow in new places. It can push a big sailboat across an ocean. We can even harness the wind to make clean energy to power our homes and schools.

That’s what I found out from my friend Gordon Taub, an engineer at Washington State University. He is very curious about wind energy and told me more about why the wind blows.

Whether it’s a breeze, a gust, or a gale, winds are blowing in our atmosphere all the time. When the sun heats the earth, it doesn’t actually heat the earth evenly.

Part of the reason the Earth doesn’t heat up evenly is that the sun is really far away. Because the Earth is a big sphere, when the sun’s rays finally get to us, they are going mainly in one direction. They are mainly pointed at the Earth’s equator. That means that rays have to travel further to get to the ground at the poles than they do at the equator. As the sun’s rays pass through the air, they get weaker.

When the air at the equator warms up, it expands, Gordon reminded me. Things start cycling around as warm air moves in to places where there is cooler air. It is this mixing and movement of air at different temperatures and pressures that gives us our winds.

The wind holds a lot of energy, too. Wind turbines can help take the kinetic or motion energy of wind and turn it into electrical energy that can power our world.

Taub’s students are actually working on a wind turbine project of their own this year and will debut it at a national competition in 2020. If you are curious about wind, maybe one day you’ll join students at WSU to investigate wind power, too.

Maybe you’ve also seen some wind turbines if you’ve traveled across our state. Taub said wind turbines usually start spinning when the wind is blowing about 11 m.p.h. They usually shut down when winds reach speeds of about 44 m.p.h., so the blades don’t get busted up.

You know, we have some pretty strong winds on planet Earth, but that’s nothing compared to other planets. Jupiter’s red spot has winds of up to 250 mph, almost twice the speed of the fastest wind on Earth [163 mph was the highest recorded]. And Neptune’s winds are the fastest in the solar system reaching 1,600 mph—even faster than a fighter jet.

On earth, wind can also help us stay cool on hot days. I think I’m going to make my very own wind-powered pinwheel this summer. You can try to make one of your own, too. We’ll need some scissors, paper, a wooden stick, and a brass fastener. Find all the instructions here and then watch your creation spin in the wind.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Letter to Senator Stabenow

Dear Senator Stabenow:

I have contacted you before–never receiving any response. I haven’t supported you because you have always supported former President Obama in all his policies. I feel  he has done more to divide this country than any other president. When he began to disparage our policemen growing a movement of disrespect for our men in blue, you never said a word.  When he started with racist remarks that have contributed to the increase of  the growing racial divide we now experience, you never spoke up.  You supported Obamacare even though it has proved a disaster and admitted it was intended to be by its author.  Now the Democratic party, instead of spending its time working to solve our country’s serious problems, is bent on wasting time and money on lies and deceptions to undo our duly elected president. Your party is no longer the Democratic party my immigrant father supported one hundred years ago.  It has become the Communist Party bent on taking over this country! Why don’t you step out of the sheep pen and stand up for what you know is right. You might even change my mind about you!

Social Security Launches New Campaign to Fight Scammers

The Social Security Administration launched a new Public Service Announcement (PSA) campaign to continue warning people about the ongoing nationwide telephone impersonation scheme.  The PSAs feature a message from Social Security Commissioner Andrew Saul.  Social Security and its Office of the Inspector General (OIG) continue to receive reports about fraudulent phone calls from people falsely claiming to be Social Security employees.  The scammers mislead victims into making cash or gift card payments for help with purported identity theft, or to avoid arrest for bogus Social Security number problems.

“I want every American to know that if a suspicious caller states there is a problem with their Social Security number or account, they should hang up and never give the caller money or personal information.  People should then go online to oig.ssa.gov to report the scam call to Social Security,” said Commissioner Saul.

People should also be on the lookout for a new version of this scam.  Fraudsters are now emailing fake documents in attempts to get people to comply with their demands.  Victims have received emails with attached letters and reports that appear to be from Social Security or the OIG.  The letters may use official letterhead and government jargon to convince victims they are legitimate; they may also contain misspellings and grammar mistakes.

The new PSA addressing the telephone impersonation scheme is available online at www.youtube.com/socialsecurity.

youtubeSocial Security employees do occasionally contact people–generally those who have ongoing business with the agency–by telephone for business purposes.  However, Social Security employees will never threaten a person, or promise a Social Security benefit approval, or increase, in exchange for information or money.  In those cases, the call is fraudulent and people should just hang up.

Generally, the agency mainly calls people who have recently applied for a Social Security benefit, someone who is already receiving payments and requires an update to their record, or a person who has requested a phone call from the agency.  If a person is not in one of these situations, they normally would not receive a call from the agency.

Social Security will not:
· Tell you that your Social Security number has been suspended.
· Contact you to demand an immediate payment.
· Ask you for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.
· Require a specific means of debt repayment, like a prepaid debit card, a retail gift card, or cash.
· Demand that you pay a Social Security debt without the ability to appeal the amount you owe.
· Promise a Social Security benefit approval, or increase, in exchange for information or money.

If there is a problem with a person’s Social Security number or record, in most cases Social Security will mail a letter.  If a person needs to submit payments to Social Security, the agency will send a letter with instructions and payment options.  People should never provide information or payment over the phone or Internet unless they are certain of who is receiving it.

Hotspots Are Now Available at Hackley Public Library

Are you interested in using the internet, but don’t have access?

Visit Hackley Public Library and check out a mobile Hotspot! This helpful device can provide Wi-Fi Internet access for up to 10 devices, and is user-friendly. Connect your computer, tablet, phone, or other device to a Hotspot, and see what you can discover. A hotspot may be checked out for one week.

To check out a hotspot, patrons must be 18 years of age or older, and must read, understand, and sign an agreement at the HPL Circulation Desk.  For more details, stop into Hackley Public Library or give us a call at 231-722-8000.

Brought through the generosity of the Friends of Hackley Public Library.

~

For more information, please contact Hackley Public Library, 316 W Webster Ave Muskegon MI 49440, at Reference: 231-722-8011, Circulation: 231-722-8000, Youth Services: 231-722-8014, askus@hackleylibrary.org, or @hackleyref.  Visit our Flickr PR album: http://bit.ly/1DSbZ6E

Trump Defense Team: Nine Key Facts Democrats Hid

from Richard Viguerie’s ConservativeHQ
[Copyright © 2019 ConservativeHQ.com, Inc.]

The establishment media skipped most of this and few Americans saw it.

Given that few Americans, even stalwart conservative CHQ readers, watched the Trump defense team’s opening presentation, we think pulling out the nine key points made by White House deputy counsel Michael Purpura will help readers understand exactly where President Trump’s defense team is headed:

HOUSE DEMOCRATS DIDN’T TELL YOU: Witnesses testified that the sale of Javelin missiles discussed on the call was unrelated to the paused security assistance.

PURPURA: “The House Managers didn’t tell you about Ambassador Yovanovitch’s and Tim Morrison’s testimony. Why not? They couldn’t take two minutes out of their 24 hours to make sure you understood that the Javelin sales and the paused security assistance are unrelated. I want to be very clear about this: When House Democrats claim that the Javelin sales discussed on the July 25 call are part of the paused security assistance, it is misleading. They are trying to confuse you.”

HOUSE DEMOCRATS DIDN’T TELL YOU: Lt. Col. Vindman admitted that his concerns about the call were just his opinion.

PURPURA: “Ultimately, Lt. Col. Vindman admitted that his opinion that the President made any sort of ‘demand’ of the Ukrainians on the July 25 call was only ‘in [his] mind’ and ‘[it wa]s just the way it seemed to [him].’ The House Managers didn’t tell you that, did they?  Why not?”

HOUSE DEMOCRATS DIDN’T TELL YOU: Jennifer Williams didn’t raise concerns about the call until after impeachment was announced.

PURURA: “Ms. Williams didn’t raise any concerns about the call when it took place.  Not with Lt. Gen. Kellogg, not with counsel, not with anyone.”

PURURA: “Ms. Williams waited to announce her concerns until Speaker Pelosi publicly announced her impeachment inquiry. The House Managers didn’t tell you that. Why not?”

HOUSE DEMOCRATS DIDN’T TELL YOU: Tim Morrison saw nothing wrong on the call and testified that he only brought the call to the attention of NSC lawyers because he was concerned the call would be leaked.

PURURA: “Tim Morrison, who was Lt. Col. Vindman’s boss, was also on the call. One of the House Managers said that he ‘reported the call to National Security Council lawyers.’ That’s incredibly misleading. The House Managers didn’t tell you why Mr. Morrison went to see the NSC lawyers. Mr. Morrison brought the call to the attention of NSC lawyers because he was concerned about leaks and, in his words, ‘how it would play out in Washington’s polarized environment.’”

PURPURA: “’I want to be clear,’ Mr. Morrison testified, ‘I was not concerned that anything illegal was discussed.’ The House Managers stopped before they told you that part of the testimony. Why didn’t they tell you that?”

PURPURA: “Mr. Morrison further testified that there was ‘nothing improper’ and ‘[n]othing illegal’ about anything that was said on the call. Again, they didn’t tell you that. Why not?”

HOUSE DEMOCRATS DIDN’T TELL YOU: Ukrainians did not know about the hold on aid.

PURPURA: “There can’t be a threat without the person knowing he’s being threatened. There can’t be a quid pro quo without the quo. … Ambassador Volker testified that the Ukrainians did not know about the hold until reading about it in Politico. … Ambassador Taylor and Tim Morrison both agreed. … Deputy Assistant Secretary of State George Kent testified that no Ukrainian official contacted him about the paused security assistance until ‘that first intense week in September.’ … The House Managers didn’t mention this testimony, from any of the four witnesses?  Why not?”

PURPURA: “Also, again, I want you to notice that the House Managers didn’t show you Mr. Yermak’s text message, and they didn’t tell you about the statements he and President Zelensky made about the call and their lack of knowledge of the pause on security assistance.  Why not?”

HOUSE DEMOCRATS DIDN’T TELL YOU:  The House’s impeachment managers borrowed heavily from Laura Cooper, but didn’t mention that she herself cast doubt on her claims about when Ukraine learned of the hold.

PURPURA: “The Managers told you that Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense Laura Cooper presented two emails that people on her staff received from people at the State Department regarding conversations with people in the Ukraine Embassy that could have been about U.S. security assistance to Ukraine. What they did not tell you is that Ms. Cooper testified that she could not say for certain whether the emails were about the pause on security assistance. She couldn’t say one way or the other. She also testified that she ‘didn’t want to speculate’ about the meaning of the words in the emails.”

PURPURA: “The House Managers also didn’t tell you Ms. Cooper testified that ‘I . . . reviewed my calendar and the only meeting where I can recall a Ukrainian official raising the issue [of security assistance] with me is on September 5th at the Ukrainian Independence Day celebration.’”

HOUSE DEMOCRATS DIDN’T TELL YOU:  Sondland’s concerns about linkage were based on his own guesses and presumptions.

PURPURA: “They didn’t show you any of these clips, not once during their 24 hour presentation. 24 hours. And they couldn’t give you context to evaluate Ambassador Sondland.  All the Democrats have to support their alleged link between security assistance and investigations is Ambassador Sondland’s assumptions and presumptions.”

PURPURA: “The President was unequivocal.  Ambassador Sondland stated that this was the ‘final word that [he] heard from the President of the United States.’  And once he learned this, he text messaged Ambassadors Taylor and Volker: ‘The President has been crystal clear, no quid pro quos of any kind.’ If you are skeptical of Ambassador Sondland’s testimony, it was corroborated by the statement of one of your colleagues, Senator Johnson.”

HOUSE DEMOCRATS DIDN’T TELL YOU: Senator Johnson’s testimony showed that President Trump never wanted a quid pro quo.

PURPURA: “Again, President Trump’s answer was crystal clear: ‘No way.  I would never do that.  Who told you that?’ As Senator Johnson wrote, ‘I have accurately characterized his reaction as adamant, vehement and angry.’ They didn’t tell you about Senator Johnson’s letter, did they? Why not?”

HOUSE DEMOCRATS DIDN’T TELL YOU: Multiple witnesses testified that there was no connection between security assistance and investigations.

PURPURA: “Under Secretary of State David Hale, George Kent, and Ambassador Volker all testified that there was no connection whatsoever between security assistance and investigations. … The House Managers never told you this.  Why not?”

And that was just the beginning.

When asked by Fox News host Neil Cavuto what he thought of the arguments laid out by the president’s defense team, Florida Republican Sen. Rick Scott said it looked like Rep. Adam Schiff got “kneecapped.”

“I think Adam Schiff got kneecapped,” Scott said. “I think the White House counsel showed there was no due process in the House. Just a fabrication [by Schiff].”

Zachor Legal Institute Announces Release of The New Anti-Semites, Report Detailing Anti-Semitism Rampant in BDS Movement

As Marc Greendorfer, President of Zachor Legal Institute, introduces in the foreword of the report:

Anti-Semitic incidents, including those involving violence, are rising in the US and throughout the world. While anti-Semitism is oftentimes considered the oldest hatred in our civilization, a toxic mutation of this ancient evil in the form of anti-Zionism is spreading. Making matters worse, hate groups on the Left and Right are joining forces, with the backing of designated foreign terror organizations, to inject this movement of intolerance and delegitimization into social justice campaigns, schools, government and society as a whole.

We have prepared the report to document how this contemporary hate, as disseminated by the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement (BDS), is negatively influencing large segments of the United States’ population and creating a dangerous environment that normalizes vilification of Jews, something that history has shown to have deadly consequences. The objective of this report is to expose the BDS faux “civil rights” movement for what it is – a delegitimization campaign fueled by Jew-hatred reminiscent of Nazi-era anti-Semitic propaganda, rather than the human rights movement that it purports to be.

The words and deeds of BDS supporters must not be ignored, especially by those of us who are living reminders of the near extermination of the Jewish people. This pattern of demonization, delegitimization and, ultimately, elimination is one that has repeated itself over millennia. We must be educated on how to prevent the horrific history of anti-Semitism from being a prelude to the future.

~

About Zachor Legal Institute: Zachor Legal Institute, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, uses the law to defend against anti-Semitism and delegitimization of Israel, with a focus on opposing BDS.

Ron Machol
Zachor Legal Institute
+1 925-328-0128