Author Archives: editor

Fruitport Township Board Meeting Agenda – 09/24/18

AGENDA
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP BOARD OF TRUSTEES
FRUITPORT TOWNSHIP HALL
5865 AIRLINE ROAD, FRUITPORT, MI 49415

SEPTEMBER 24, 2018

6:30 P.M. WORK SESSION
7:00 P.M. BOARD MEETING

01. Pledge of Allegiance
02. Roll call
03. Approval of board minutes: 9/10/18
04. Approve / amend agenda
05. Correspondence / reports
06. Public comments regarding agenda items

07. Unfinished Business
none

08. New Business
A. Public Hearing: Motion Dynamics IFT request
B. Sewer rate increase
C. OBEB discussion

09. Approval of Bills
10. Reports
11. Public Comments
12. Adjournment

The Township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the following Township Clerk: Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Township Hall, 5865 Airline Road, Fruitport, MI 49415 (231) 865-3151

Sensory Trail at Grand River Park

Eagle Scout constructs trail for children and families living with autism to experience the outdoors

Theodore (Tas) Stoetzner of Boy Scout Troop 354 of Jenison completed his Eagle Scout project by constructing the park system’s first sensory trail in May.

“I chose this project to help kids and families who live with autism enjoy the parks and be outside more. When I was learning about trails, I learned that autistic children sometimes have challenges with senses and decided that I should help them with four stations to help them hear, see, and feel different things in nature,” said Tas.

tasandothersRecognizing that this trail would need extra attention and upkeep, the Parks Department required Tas to recruit a local organization or business to adopt the trail. Tas connected with Autism Support of West Shore, and they agreed to sign on as Adopt-a-Park volunteers.

“Having sensory trails in parks throughout West Michigan makes parks more accessible,” said Linda Ellenbaas from Autism Support of West Shore. “Many children with autism have sensory challenges, either under or over stimulation, and these trails allow children to engage their senses in a safe, natural setting. Those who seek extra movement like running or extended walks can also utilize the trail, with the added bonus of the sensory input.”

An Adopt-a-Park commitment to Ottawa County Parks requires volunteers to visit a park multiple times throughout a year. Ottawa County Parks is grateful for companies who are able to dedicate the time required to the program. When asked what inspired Autism Support of West Michigan to make the commitment, Ellenbaas said, “Our children are often not successful in what would be considered child-friendly places for play and enjoyment. The Autism Support of West Shore board saw this as an opportunity for children on the spectrum to have a place to go and enjoy the outdoors providing them a unique sensory experiences in nature. Autism Support of West Shore is proud to collaborate with Tas and Ottawa County Parks on this unique venture.”

The sensory stations

sensory stations• At two listening stations, users can identify the local birds and their calls.
• At the walk through station, users will walk on pine cones, stones, wood chips, and logs to feel different textures.
• At the manual dexterity station, children can dig and find 15 hidden paving stones, each with different textures.
• The yoga station is intended to help users stretch their bodies and enjoy their surroundings.

Begin at the trail head closest to the picnic building/lake and follow the loop to intersection 7 to 6 to 3 and end at intersection 2 to see all of the stations.

Trail map below

trailmaphttps://news.miottawa.org/grand-river-park-sensory-trail/

Village of Fruitport Special Council Meeting Minutes – 09/10/18

VILLAGE OF FRUITPORT
SPECIAL COUNCIL MEETING
September 10th, 2018

1. Call to order
President Roger Vanderstelt called the meeting to order at 7:00pm

2. Pledge

3. Prayer

4. Roll call
Present: Donna Pope, Amy Haack, Will Overkamp, Jay Bolt, Jeff Guiles and Carl Rothenberger (Carl left at 7:50pm)
Also present: Jeremy Statler, DPW Supervisor

5. Approval of August 20th meeting minutes
Motion made by Donna to approve the minutes, supported by Will. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

6. Approve the agenda for the September 10th Special Council meeting
Motion made by Amy to approve the agenda, supported by Carl. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

7. Public Comment
None

8. 2020 3rd Avenue Project
Roger explained that the special meeting is to discuss the 2020 Projects. Jay prepared a 2020 Project Proposal Summary for the Council. Roger asked Jay to review the summary that was put together with the council. Jay proceeded to give an introduction of the project and history. Jay described the scope of the project, the cost, project timing, Village revenue and budget summary and the possible financial options for funding.
Discussion took place about the cost of hooking up to the sewer, a special assessment district, the maintenance of sewer system, funding and public input regarding sewers.
The council discussed an action plan. It was determined that Jeremy along with council members would solicit input from the business owners on 3rd Avenue and report back to the council. The council requested Jeremy to provide a financial summary of the total costs to hook up to the sewer system. Jeremy was also asked to provide information on Special Assessment options.

9. Public Comment
None

10. Adjourn
Motion made by Donna to adjourn at 8:39pm, supported by Jay. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

Respectfully submitted by,

Ann LaCroix
Clerk

Muskegon County Calendar of Events 09/17/18 – 9/24/18

Presented by the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau
www.visitmuskegon.org

Disenchanted
September 14 @ 7:30 pm – September 29 @ 7:30 pm
September 14 – 29 at 7:30pm (Sunday matinees are at 3:00pm), come to the Beardsley Theater for Muskegon Civic Theatre’s production of “Disenchanted!”
Poisoned apples…glass slippers…who needs ’em?  Not Snow White and her posse of disenchanted princesses in the hilarious hit musical that is anything but Grimm.  Forget the princesses you think you know.  When these royal renegades toss off their tiaras, this hilariously subversive, not-for-the-kiddies musical cleverly reveals what really happened ‘ever after’!  Tickets are $22 and $20.  For more information, call the box office at 231-727-8001.

Marketing Monday: The Value of Volunteering & Sponsorships on Business
September 17 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Monday, September 17 from 12:00pm – 1:00pm, come to the Muskegon Innovation Hub for a Marketing Monday!  The theme will be “The Value of Volunteering & Sponsorships on Business.”  Giving back to your community isn’t just the right thing to do, it’s also good for business.  Learn how community involvement can boost your bottom line.  Conducted by Chanda Cregg of TMB Partners and Parties in the Park.  The cost is $10 and you will need to pre-register at eventbrite.com.  No walk-ins, no exceptions.  For more information, call 616-331-6900.

Silversides Submarine Museum: Fall 2018 Lecture Series
Mondays @ 6:00 pm
The USS Silversides Submarine Museum invites you to join them for their Fall 2018 Lecture Series!  The lectures will all be on Monday nights and begin at 6:00pm.  This year, the lectures will be held in their newly renovated theater on the first floor of the museum.  The cost to attend is $5.00 per person, per lecture.  If you are a member, your admission ticket to the lecture is included with your membership.  For more information, call (231) 755-1230.
• September 17 – The Spanish American War/Kurt Troutman
• September 24 – World War I/George Maniates
• October 1 – World War II Asia/Fred Johnson
• October 8 – World War II Europe/Kurt Troutman and George Maniates
• October 15 – Korean War/Ron Janowski
• October 22 – Vietnam War/Jim Smither
• October 29 – D-Day/Ed Gordon
• November 5 – War Road Trip Summary/Bill Jacobks

Roll On Muskegon
Mondays @ 6:30 pm
“Roll on Muskegon” is a fun, community, bicycle ride through the neighborhoods of Muskegon.  Bikers meet every Monday at the downtown Muskegon Farmers’ Market.  This easy 8 mph, family friendly ride begins at 6:30pm.  For more information, find them on Facebook.

Team Trivia Game Show
Mondays @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Mondays at 6:30pm, come to Racquet’s Downtown Grill for the Team Trivia Game Show!  Groups of any size are invited to play for free with prizes for the top three teams!  Categories range from pop culture and entertainment, to sports, history, science, culture and general knowledge.  Your live host will also offer many genres of music throughout the game, plus, you’ll enjoy food and drink specials each week.  For more information, call (231) 726-4007.

Gnocchi Like a Pro with Sofia
September 18 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Tuesday, September 18 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm, come to Kitchen 242 inside the Muskegon Farmers’ Market for the culinary class, “Gnocchi Like a Pro with Sofia!”
Learn to make several versions of Gnocchi from Sofia who will share her recipes from her region of Italy. There’ll be plenty for eating in class and probably some to take home as well.  Learn to be a pro at making Gnocchi from a pro.  The cost is $35.  For more information, call (231) 769-2202 or visit Eventbrite.com to sign up.

Free Planetarium and Science Museum at Muskegon Community College
Tuesdays and Thursdays @ 7:00 pm
Carr-Fles Planetarium, room 135: “Oasis in Space” transports the audience on a startling and beautiful voyage through our universe, galaxy, and solar system in search of liquid water, a key ingredient for life on Earth. This 35-minute program will run August 28 – October 30 on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:00pm. No reservations are needed.
John Bartley Science Museum, room 141: (across the hall from the planetarium) has new exhibits on electricity and magnetism. Open 9:00am – 4:00pm on Mondays and Wednesdays, and 9:00am – 7:00pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays so you can visit before the planetarium show.  Fridays are by appointment only.
For more information, or to schedule a free, private visit for your group, call (231) 777-0289 or email tamera.owens@muskegoncc.edu.

Muskegon Farmers’ Market & Flea Market
The Muskegon Farmers’ Market is more than a market, it’s an experience!  The summer market season for 2018 is May – November from 8:00am – 2:00pm, Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays.  The Flea Market at the Muskegon Farmers’ Market is every Wednesday, May – October from 8:00am – 2:00pm.  For more information, call (231)722-3251 or visit muskegonfarmersmarket.com.

ArtSmarts! 2018 Fall Lecture Series: Art Glass
September 19 @ 6:30 pm
The Muskegon Friends of Art present their ArtSmarts! 2018 Fall Lecture Series: Art Glass on three Wednesday evenings in September at the Muskegon Museum of Art.  This program supports art education at the MMA.

September 12 – Studio Glass: Origins
Speaker:  Corey Hampson, President of Habatat Galleries of Royal Oak and President of the Michigan Glass Collecting Alliance

September 19 – Glass Life, Detroit Glass Community
Speaker:  Brent Swanson, Director of the Flint Institute of Arts new and highly regarded glass program

September 26 – From the Hot Shop to Everyday Spaces:  A look at the installation work of Dale Chihuly
Speaker: James Milostan, Collections Manager at the Muskegon Museum of Art and previous member of renowned studio glass artist Dale Chihuly’s installation team

ArtSmarts! lectures take place at the Muskegon Museum of Art auditorium at 7:00pm. Doors open at 6:30pm.  The cost for the complete lecture series is $45 per person and $30 per person for members of the MMA Friends of Art.  Individual lectures will be $15 per person at the door.  Registration forms are available at the MMA Museum Store or call 231-720-2580.
Friends of Art is a non-profit organization founded to promote the study and appreciation of the visual arts and to support the Muskegon Museum of Art.  The Friends of Art has bee

Images of America: Muskegon Book Talk & Signing
September 20 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Thursday, September 20 from 5:00pm – 7:00pm, come to the Lakeshore Museum Center for a book talk and signing with Norma Lewis and Christine Nyholm, authors of “Images of America: Muskegon.”  Have your book signed before or after the presentation in the museum auditorium at 5:30pm.  Books will be available for purchase in the Museum Store.  Registration not required and seating for the talk at 5:30 will be first come, first served.  For more information, call 231-722-0278.

Opening Event: Armand Merizon, His Life and Art
September 20 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
September 20 from 5:30pm – 7:00pm, come to the Muskegon Museum of Art for the opening of their new exhibition, “Armand Merizon: His Life and Art!”  Celebrate the opening of this autumn exhibition and look into the life and work of the late West Michigan artist Armand Merizon.  Muriel Zandstra, author of the book “Armand Merizon: His Life and Art” will be on hand to sign books.  Books are available to purchase in the MMA Museum Store.  There will be refreshments and cash bar.  This event is free and open to the public.  For more information, call 231-720-2570.

Trinkets & Treasures
September 21 – September 22
Friday, September 21 from 9:00am – 5:00pm and Saturday, September 22 from 9:00am – 3:00pm, come to the Folkert Community HUB for Muskegon’s largest annual indoor yard sale, Trinkets & Treasures! This event is put on every year by the Women’s Division of the Chamber of Commerce to raise funds for local non-profits.  This year’s proceeds benefit the Muskegon Museum of Art, Read Muskegon and the USS LST 393 Veterans Museum.  For more information, call 231-955-0789.
Get in on the Early Bird Sale!  Give a $5 donation to enter and shop at 8:00am on Friday!  There will also be a Pre-Party for Members and Guests, Wednesday, September 19 from 5:30pm – 8:00pm.  Pre-Party tickets are $20 for members and $25 for non-members.  Tickets are still available and include appetizers, desserts and beverages.  All attendees must be age 21 or older.  No children.
They are accepting unwanted goods as donations for Trinkets & Treasures.
All Donations MUST be in a SEALED BOX—no bags.
• Clothing
• Furniture
• Housewares
• Vintage
• Toys (no stuffed toys)
• Books and more!
Items MUST be SELLABLE and CLEAN, NEW or GENTLY USED
To arrange date and time for drop-off, call Jo Anne Hoekenga (231) 955-0789 or Debra Walters (231) 747-8732.
NO undergarments, NO stuffed toys, NO electronics, NO computers, NO major appliances, NO TVs will be accepted.

231 Snow Show 2018!
September 21 – September 22
Friday and Saturday, September 21 – 22, come to Mt. Garfield for the 231 Snow Show!  This is a great opportunity to see what’s new and exciting in the world of snowmobiling.  Whether it is watching professional freestyle riders, meeting the vendors, participating in the swap meet, watching the vintage snowmobiles or going on a demo ride, they’ve got you covered!
A team of freestyle riders will be performing fast paced, technical and highly entertaining stunt shows! Expect to be blown away with their aggressive style of riding while also engaging with the crowd.
There are dealers specializing in all things snowmobile; from vintage to performance and new snowmobiles.  An event of this magnitude wouldn’t be complete without the major manufacturers like Polaris, Yamaha and Arctic Cat.
Enjoy vintage snowmobiles!  From your father’s daily rider to the first sled you rode as a kid, they all have special meaning.  This show is large enough to include those untouched time capsules as well as the immaculately restored works of art.
The cost is $15 for the whole weekend.  Kids under 12 are free!  For more information, call (231) 750-1200 or e-mail contact@231snowshow.com.

2nd Annual Golftoberfest
September 21 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
September 21 from 11:00am – 6:00pm, the Muskegon Sports Council invites you to join them at Lincoln Golf Club for the 2nd Annual Golftoberfest.  This is a Bavarian inspired event for golfers!  This is a 4 person scramble that will commence with an 11:00am shotgun start.  Each person hits a shot and the team takes the best shot.  This process is repeated until the hole is finished.  Men under 65 play from the black tees.  Men 65 and older play from silver tees.  Women play from the gold tees.  Each golfer’s registration includes unlimited lunch, a complimentary gift bag and an official Oktoberfest beer tasting stein.
By supporting this event, you’re doing more than just helping with a fun golf outing, you’re helping to make families healthier and helping kids reach their Olympic dreams at the Muskegon Winter Sports Complex.  For more information, call 231-744-9629.

Hackley & Hume Historic Site: All Access Tour
September 21 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Friday night, September 21 from 7:00pm – 8:30pm, you’re invited to the Hackley & Hume Historic Site for an All Access Tour!  Go where no visitor has gone before as you explore what’s behind closed doors including attics, porches, and basements of both houses.
The third Friday of the month, enjoy and experience different themed topics such as restoration, preservation, family stories, new discoveries in the research, Hackley House during the Red Cross, and Hume as a Daycare Center, and future projects.
The cost is $20 for non-members or $15 for members.  RSVP is required, but they will accept walk-ins if there is room.  They will accept 15 people on the tour, but if they have a lot of interest, they will be able to accommodate 30 people.  To reserve a spot on the All Access Tour, contact Aaron Mace at aaron@lakeshoremuseum.org or 231-724-5534.

Breakfast Benefit for 70×7
September 22 @ 7:00 am – 9:00 am
Saturday, September 22 from 7:00am – 9:00am, have breakfast at Toast ‘N Jams and 100% of sales will be donated to 70×7 Muskegon!  For more information, call (231) 737-5267.

Walk to End Alzheimer’s
September 22 @ 9:30 am – 5:00 pm
Saturday, September 22 from 9:30am – 5:00pm, come to Heritage Landing and joint the fight for Alzheimer’s first survivor by participating the 2018 Walk to End Alzheimer’s!  You’ll raise critical awareness and funds for Alzheimer’s care, support and research.
For more information head to alz.org/walk.

Smithsonian Magazine’s Museum Day
September 22 @ 10:00 am – 4:30 pm
Saturday, September 22 from 10:00am – 4:30pm, Michigan’s Heritage Park is proud to host Smithsonian Magazine’s Museum Day!  Museums around the country will offer FREE tickets to those who download Museum Day tickets for the event.  Come experience all the park has to offer including hands-on activities, costumed interpreters, and lots of fun and learning!  This year’s Museum Day theme will showcase “Women Making History: Trailblazers in the arts, sciences, innovation, and culture.  Museum Day tickets are FREE and must be downloaded from the Smithsonian website at www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/museum-day-2018/.

Muskegon Heritage Museum Community Days: Board of Trade – Muskegon Lakeshore Chamber of Commerce 125 Years
September 22 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm
The Muskegon Heritage Museum is offering “Community Days” throughout the 2018 season with free admission sponsored by Consumers Energy Foundation!  Saturday, September 22, the theme is “Board of Trade – Muskegon Lakeshore Chamber of Commerce 125 Years,” featuring guests from the Chamber staff.  For more information, call (231) 722-1363.

Light House Tours
September 22 @ 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm
The Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy is offering tours of the Muskegon South Pierhead Light Saturdays in September from 4:30pm – 7:30pm.  The cost is $2 for kids under 12, $3 for veterans and active duty military, and $4 for adults.  Private tours can be arranged for $50 per person.  For more information, call 844-MLIGHTS or visit www.muskegonlights.org

The Sound of History at the Hackley & Hume Historic Site
September 22 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Saturday evening, September 22 from 6:00pm – 9:00pm, join the folks from the Lakeshore Museum Center for a special, one night only event at the Hackley and Hume Historic Site!  Start out the evening with hors-d’oeuvres and adult beverages in the City Barn, then walk over to the Hackley House to enjoy music performed by the Applewood String Ensemble.  This stringed quartet group will take you back in time as you experience classic and popular pieces from Gershwin, Puccini, Kreisler, and more.  Space is limited so be sure to reserve your tickets at the website below!

Aquastar Cruises
Aquastar is the new name of the Muskegon Lake-based cruise boat formerly known as the Port City Princess!  Hop aboard and get away from the world for an hour and a half as you explore beautiful Lake Michigan and Muskegon Lake on an afternoon or sunset cruise.   As always, a cash bar and light snacks will be available.  The ticket price is $20.  Kids under 10 are admitted free with adults.  For more information or tickets, visit their website at https://aquastarcruises.com/ or call 231-903-0669.

Sushi 101 with Chef Damon
September 23 @ 5:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Sunday, September 23 from 5:00pm – 7:30pm, come to Kitchen 242 inside the Muskegon Farmers’ Market for the culinary class, “Sushi 101 with Chef Damon!”
Learn simple and easy sushi recipes with Chef Damon.  Everyone can learn and enjoy the basic art of sushi making.  This will be a hands-on learning experience that will teach you how to spread, layer, tuck and roll sushi and then taste the fruits of your labor.  It starts with perfect rice.  This is a great couples class, but you can attend by yourself, too.  You will be using raw fish and seafood in this class.  The cost is $45.  For more information, call (231) 769-2202 or visit Eventbrite.com to sign up

“Truth: Works by Brenda Beerhorst and Cathy Marashi”
September 24 @ 9:00 am – 4:00 pm
“Truth: Works By Brenda Beerhorst and Cathy Marashi” will be on exhibit in Muskegon Community College’s Overbrook Art Gallery from September 24 – October 25.  Admission is free and the gallery hours are Monday-Friday from 9:00am – 4:00pm with special weekend and evening hours during performances and concerts in the adjacent Overbrook Theater.  On Thursday, October 4, a free public reception will take place from 4:00pm – 5:30pm.  The artists will discuss their artwork at 4:30pm.  For more information, contact the MCC Arts and Humanities Department at (231) 777-0324.

Hackley’s Confederate Gold? A Presentation
September 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Are you curious about the Confederate Gold theories and rumors regarding Charles Hackley and Muskegon?  Monday, September 24 at 6:00pm, come to Hackley Public Library for a compelling presentation from Assistant Program Manager, Aaron Mace, from Lakeshore Museum Center’s Hackley & Hume Historic Site!  Aaron will give great insight as he discusses these theories and rumors, and presents their findings.  This program is free to the public and is brought to you through the generosity of the Friends of Hackley Library.  For more information, call (231) 722-8000.

Overturning Roe is Pro-Choice

On July 9, President Trump announced he would nominate Judge Brett Kavanaugh to fill the vacant U.S. Supreme Court seat following the retirement of Anthony Kennedy.

Judge Kavanaugh is undeniably qualified to serve on the Supreme Court. Yet before his nomination was even announced, criticism began. The Women’s March embarrassed itself by sending out a press release naming the nominee as “XX.” They forgot to paste in the name of the nominee before predicting a “death sentence for thousands of women.”

The potential that Kennedy’s replacement may create a majority in favor of overturning Roe v. Wade is the cause of these unhinged reactions. What would actually happen if Roe was overturned?

It’s important to note that thousands of women across the fruited plain will not die in childbirth, or however else the Women’s March expects them to brutally die at the hands of the nefarious Justice XX.

What would actually happen is the U.S. Supreme Court would correctly recognize that the U.S. Constitution is silent on abortion. Abortion laws would once again be in the hands of the voters to choose.

Letting voters choose abortion laws poses a serious problem for pro-abortion organizations. A vast majority of Americans reject the effects of Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton, which together legalized abortion-on-demand through all nine months of pregnancy.

Gallup routinely does polling on abortion. In May, they released a detailed poll about the legality of first or third trimester abortions in specific cases. Only 29% polled believe third trimester abortions should be legal for children diagnosed with Down syndrome. An Indiana law banning abortions targeted at children with Down syndrome was recently overturned because of Roe v. Wade.

More than 90% of abortions are done purely for social or economic reasons. According to the Gallup poll, only 45% of Americans believe first trimester abortions for those reasons should be legal. Roe v. Wade takes away any opportunity to address that in any significant way.

If we want to uphold our core democratic values, we must not reject fair judges simply to disenfranchise a majority of American voters. Groups calling themselves “pro-choice” should welcome the opportunity to give voters a chance to debate abortion in the public square.

Would Judge Brett Kavanaugh potentially be the fifth vote to overturn Roe v. Wade? We won’t know until we get there. If we do, we have nothing to fear but democracy itself.

A 29th Letter to America

Dear Editor:

America has come a long way from July 4, 1776, when it declared its independence from Great Britain, and said in its declaration, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

Many paid a great price to obtain independence from the then powerful Empire of Great Britain. Nine of the 56 signers of the Declaration “died from wounds, or hardships of The Revolutionary War of Independence.”

Since that war, hundreds of thousands more have died to preserve this great country and its principles.

Unfortunately, too many have forgotten what those principles were.

To many, “these truths” are not so “self-evident” any more. Instead of, “that all men are created equal” they divide us into different races and groups.  But there is only one Human Race, and it started with Adam and Eve.  When they divide, they are actually saying we are not equal to them.  THOSE ARE THE REAL RACISTS.

America must return to God, the Creator.  He did in fact create everything on Earth and the Heavens.  Those fellows’ souls who said otherwise, are in the Hell God created.  Theirs was nothing but nonsense!

The Creator did give us “certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” Defend those rights properly and appreciate them, and the sacrifice Americans have made to protect them.

Love God and your Neighbor/Fellowman, as He directed us to do.

IN JESUS NAME STOP THE BABY KILLING

Manuel Ybarra, Jr.  Coalgate, OK

Ask Dr. Universe – Why Music Gives Us Chills – Part 2

Part 2: Dr. Universe: Why does music give us chills? -Nicole, 11, Spokane, Wash.

Dear Nicole,

It turns out that the experience of getting chills when we listen to music actually has a scientific name: frisson. That’s what I found out when I met up with Washington State University brain scientist Steve Simasko.

Simasko said he also experienced frisson last year when the moon passed in front of the sun and he saw the total solar eclipse. That made me realize we not only get the chills when we experience music, but also when we experience other kinds of art or wonders in nature.

It isn’t exactly easy to measure frisson, but Simasko said we can still make a few speculations about it based on what we know about the brain.

When we take in music we are using our limbic system. This is a system which helps us process emotions and memories. In the middle of the brain is the amygdala, which also plays a big part in processing emotions.

This emotional system helps us navigate the world. When you experience different emotions, sometimes a physical sensation comes along with it. Fear might give you sweaty palms, a racing heart, and desire to run away from something. This kind of response is helpful for survival.

We also have other kinds of responses. When you get nervous maybe you experience the sensation of butterflies in your stomach. This triggers a release of adrenaline in the body. That left me wondering: Why is frisson tied to this emotional system in our brain?

Simasko explained that human emotions are closely tied to the social part of people’s lives. Sound can actually be an important part of our social life from a very young age. Mothers often sing to their babies, and the babies often coo back. It is part of human bonding.

Emotions are not just important for survival, but also understanding norms, or the way things usually work in a group. Music is also tied closely to our culture—it’s something that we can use to connect and we can share with each other.

If someone grew up listening to opera in China, maybe they get goosebumps when they hear it as an adult. Maybe you live in another part of the world and don’t listen to Chinese opera. It might not have as strong as a connection to you and those around you. But maybe there is a different kind of music that reminds you of memories with your family and friends. Can you think of a kind of music that gives you the chills?

While music is an important part of people’s lives, the truth is, we still don’t know everything about why it gives us the chills. But we do know that a lot of people experience frisson. Perhaps we will learn more about it one day, but until then, keep asking great questions– and turn up the music.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

FCS – Personnel Committee Meeting Minutes – 09/12/18

PERSONNEL COMMITTEE
Wednesday, September 12, 2018
7:00 a.m. ~ Superintendent’s Office
MEETING MINUTES

Attendance: Steve Kelly, Tim Burgess, Dave Hazekamp, Bob Szymoniak

1. Changes to Adult Ed staffing were explained and received support to put on the Board agenda for action.

2. General discussion was held regarding various personnel matters and other district happenings. This was for informational purposes only.

Meeting adjourned at 8:20 p.m.

FCS – Business and Finance Committee Meeting Minutes – 09/10/18

Business and Finance Committee
Monday, September 10, 2018
11:30 a.m., Superintendent’s Office
Meeting Minutes

Attendance: Dave Hazekamp, Elroy Buckner, Kris Cole, Mark Mesbergen, and Bob Szymoniak

1. Bond Update
Mark and Bob gave an update on the Bond.

2. Cash Flow
Mark gave an update on Fruitport’s cash flow. Mark recommends the board take action on a resolution giving Bob and Mark the authority to borrow money for cash flow. Mark is not sure if the district would need to borrow due to when property taxes would be received but Mark felt this is something that could be done ahead of time to save time if there was a need to borrow.

Meeting adjourned at 12:25 p.m.

Respectfully submitted by Mark Mesbergen

Fruitport Board of Education Meeting Agenda – 09/17/18

Fruitport Community Schools
BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING
Fruitport High School Media Center
Monday, September 17, 2018 – 7:00 p.m.

I. CALL to ORDER

II. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

III. ROLL CALL

IV. APPROVAL OF AGENDA

V. PRESENTATIONS
Eagle Scout Presentation

VI. COMMUNICATIONS

VII. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC*

VIII. SUPERINTENDENT/ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS

IX. CONSENT AGENDA
1. Approval of Regular Meeting Minutes of August 20, 2018 (attachment IX-1)
2. Approval of Bills (attachment IX-2)
General Fund                              $731,917.16
Other Funds:
Early Childhood Center                   3,082.03
Food Service                                      7,755.81
Coop Ed (ISD) Tech Millage           72,100.89
Building and Site                             48,470.00
Capital Projects (BOND)                 29,647.61        
Total Bill List                              $892,973.50

3. Acceptance of Monthly Financial Report and ACH Transactions (attachment IX-3)
4. Acceptance of Student Activity Summary Report (attachment IX-4)
5. Acceptance of Credit Card and Utilities Report (attachment IX-5)
6. Approval of Capital Projects Progress Report (attachment IX-6)
7. Approval of Personnel Report (includes confirmation of new hires, resignations, retirees, and transfers) (attachment IX-7)

X. GENERAL BOARD BUSINESS
1. Second and Final Reading of Grading Policy (attachment X-1)

XI. BUSINESS & FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Elroy Buckner, Chairperson
1. Report of Committee Meeting held September 10, 2018 (attachment XI-1)
2. Authority to Borrow Funds (attachment XI-2)

XII. PERSONNEL COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Steve Kelly, Chairperson
1. Report of Committee Meeting held September 12, 2018 (attachment XII-1)
2. Changes to Adult Education Staff Responsibilities (attachment XII-2)
3. Clerical Letter of Agreement (attachment XII-3)

XIII. STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Jill Brott, Chairperson

XIV. BOARD MEMBER REPORTS AND DISCUSSIONS

XV. AGENDA ITEMS FOR FUTURE MEETINGS & SCHEDULING OF SPECIAL MEETINGS
1. Schedule Business & Finance Committee Meeting
2. Schedule Personnel Committee Meeting
3. Schedule Student Affairs Committee Meeting
4. Board Workshop – Monday, September 24, 2018 at 6:00 p.m.
5. Ad Hoc Construction Meeting – September 25, 2018, 10:15 a.m. O-A-K Trailer
6. Schedule Board Workshops (April, June, September and October)

XVI. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC*

XVII. ADJOURNMENT

~

*Time is provided for members of the audience to address the Board of Education regarding any topic including items on the agenda. The board is providing two opportunities for the public to comment during the meeting. The first is for people who wish to bring issues to the Board of Education for board consideration. At the end of the meeting the board will provide a brief opportunity for community members to comment on activities and/or discussion that took place during the board meeting. Time limits may be placed if a large number of individuals would like to address the board.

New “Travel-Friendly” United Airlines Schedule

ord-mkgMuskegon County Airport (MKG) is extremely pleased to announce starting October 5, 2018, United Airlines is providing a new travel-friendly schedule to/from Chicago O’Hare (ORD) making it easier than ever to travel from Muskegon for business or pleasure.

tableThe benefits of this new schedule include arriving in Chicago by 6:00 AM, Denver by 9:30 AM, Washington, DC by 9:50 AM, Phoenix by 9:50 AM, and Los Angeles by 10:30 AM. The late evening arrival allows maximum opportunities for return flights connecting from most domestic and international locations such as Mexico and Europe. More connections mean lower prices for our travelers.

“This is a tremendous opportunity for the West Michigan Shoreline region. Every airport wants the best schedule possible to support air travel” said Jeffrey Tripp, Airport Manager “This schedule maximizes connections to/from destinations across the U.S. and around the world from Muskegon.”

The It Generation?

submitted by Mike Simcik

We have had the Un-Civil War generation 1845 to 1880 and the Lost generation from 1890 to 1915.

The Interbellum generation was from 1901 to 1913 and the Greatest generation from 1910 to 1924.

The Silent generation was from 1925 to 1945 and the Baby Boomers from 1946 to 1964.

Then we had Generation X from 1965 to 1979 and the Xennials from 1975 to 1985.

Next came Generation Y and the Millennial’s 1980 to 1994 and Generation Z from 1995 to 2012.

More recently came the Alpha generation, 2013 to 2017, now we have the IT generation 2018 to ?.

We call this the IT generation because there is no more gender allowed in public or private use. Yes, that means anyone can apply to anything using only a last name. No more gender names can be used like Bill or Mary or John and Jane not to mention Mr. & Mrs. We will all become known as It! Think of all the possibilities, we can be male today and female tomorrow.

When a crime occurs, here is what you tell the law enforcement officers when they ask you to describe the Perpetrator; it had some hair and was wearing cloths. That’s all you can say because we can’t offend any one by mentioning race, color, or sexuality. That would be targeting! We can’t mention any defects, nor can we say average height, tall, short, fat or skinny because that would be too demeaning.

The new America has reduced its intellect to the level of a one-celled amoeba! It no longer has the ability to define and direct its own culture, society, and future. We are reverting to a mindless mass of green goo, floating aimlessly in a toxic waste pond. And then we wonder why the world no longer respects or looks to us for help and guidance.

When the doctor stands over my deathbed, telling me it’s time for me to go, and since I have no gender my parting shot will be, “Well paint me yellow and call me a taxi!” I’m ready.

Imagine yourself in a tavern or restaurant, and after having a few beers you walk to a single bathroom with no door only a question mark above it in place of “male or female”. You now have the privilege of standing shoulder to shoulder at the urinals with your fellow Americans regardless of gender. I guess half of this nation must learn how to do it standing up. So proud!

Think about all the money the government, schools, and municipalities will save by having only one bathroom. We won’t even need a door to worry about or privacy walls from each other or from the public for that matter. They will be completely indifferent. After all, individuality is so outdated.

But please don’t worry about all this crap that the liberals and socialist come up with because it can all be compared to flatulence. Of course, this analysis would make the ancient wise men and profits correct once again when they said; “And this too will pass!”

Fruitport Charter Township Board of Trustees Meeting Minutes of August 27, 2018

A work session of the Fruitport Charter Township Board began at 6:30pm on Monday, August 27, 2018, in the township board room.

Members Present: Heidi Tice, Supervisor; Andrea Anderson, Clerk; Rose Dillon, Treasurer; Trustees Jeff Jacobs, Denise Winebarger, and Greg Hulka
Members Absent: Todd Dunham, excused

At 7:00pm, Heidi Tice opened the regular meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance followed by a prayer.

Also Present: 11- residents; 3- employees; 4- guests; Director of Public Safety, Brian Michelli; Director of Public Utilities, Ron Langlois; Attorney Ron Bultje.

The motion by Rose Dillon, supported by Greg Hulka, was carried unanimously, to approve the minutes of August 13, 2018 as presented.

The motion by Rose Dillon, supported by Andrea Anderson, was carried unanimously, to approve the agenda as presented.

CORRESPONDENCE / REPORTS
1. Rose Dillon shared Library minutes.
2. Brian Michelli reported an ongoing problem with vehicle breaking and entering; there was a media release regarding the traffic sign and the grant used to purchase it; new turn out gear has been delivered to the Fire Department; Lowes donated a basketball hoop to the Fire Department; new speed limit signs have been installed in the Village.
3. Ron Langlois reported that the Water Department just completed hydrant painting in district C; hydrant flushing will begin September 17th and will occur between the hours of 5:30pm-10:30pm; completed cleaning of wet wells in the lift stations.
4. The August Community Day Slip ‘n Slide was successful and well attended- Thank you to the Lion’s Club and Fruitport Trojans Youth Football for your partnerships.

PUBLIC COMMENTS REGARDING AGENDA ITEMS:
1. Linda Corinti asked if the last year’s Library operating costs were within the projected budget.
2. Jay Bolt of the Village Council made a statement thanking the Public Safety Department for their efforts in community outreach and participation in the events in Pomona Park; must get the word out for residents to support the library; the proposed 2020 project would potentially bring sewer down 3rd St during the road improvement construction.

UNFINISHED BUSINESS:

18-110 Muskegon Heights water settlement bond figures
Jeff Jacobs moved, Greg Hulka seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to authorize the Township to expend such amount of Township funds from the water system fund as is necessary to pay the judgment to settle the Muskegon Heights litigation and costs of issuance of judgment bonds over and above an amount of $2,000,000 received for these purposes from the issuance of judgment bonds, with the Township Supervisor and Township Treasurer authorized to approve the final amount of this expenditure; alternatively, if the Township is able to pay off existing County bond with 2 payments left, Township Officers have authority to pay off that County bond and then bond up to 2,431,717.91 to settle the Muskegon Heights lawsuit.
Ayes: Jacobs, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger, Hulka
Nays: None

18-111 School Resource Officer
Under the proposed agreement, Fruitport School District would contribute $40,000 annually to have a School Resource Officer placed in the school district by Fruitport Township Police Department. The cost of a senior officer would be approximately $87,635 annually. There is the possibility of a grant being available to the Police Department next year for such a position. The Public Safety Director stated that with changes made within the Police Department this fiscal year, there will be enough funds in the current budget to cover the expense of adding this Officer. Upon discussion among the Board and the Township Attorney, 5 changes were proposed to the presented agreement.
Jeff Jacobs moved, Heidi Tice seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to authorize the Supervisor and Clerk to sign the agreement after the 5 presented changes occur.
Ayes: Jacobs, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger
Nays: Hulka

NEW BUSINESS:

18-112 Presentation of proposed Parks project
Members of the Parks Board were present to request funds for the installation of a crushed concrete sub-structure for an additional driveway and parking lot at the Sheringer Soccer Park. Two bids were presented: (1) Paul Schultz Trucking and Excavating $99,142.00 (2) West Michigan Dirtworks $87,958.36.
The motion by Heidi Tice, seconded by Greg Hulka, was carried unanimously, to TABLE this topic until the next meeting when the Auditor will be giving the annual audit report.

18-113 911 surcharge presentation
Shawn Grabinski, Director of Muskegon Central Dispatch along with Chief Dave Glotzbach of Muskegon Township Fire Department and Board Member of Muskego Central Dispatch gave a presentation to share information on the proposed 911 surcharge that will be on the November 6th ballot. The proposed surcharge would increase the current $0.42 surcharge to $2.75 per phone line.

18-114 Payment of bills
Jeff Jacobs moved, Greg Hulka seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to approve bills as presented for payment in the following amounts: General Fund $36,307.82; Public Safety $19,830.56; Water $13,136.53; Sewer $17,329.71; T&A $654.00; Street lights $100.00; Revolving Road $5.95              Totaling: $87,364.57
Ayes: Hulka, Winebarger, Dillon, Tice, Anderson, Jacobs
Nays: none

ADDITIONAL REPORTS:
1. Jeff Jacobs confirmed with the Board that all members are still in support of the proposed Little River Casino. The project is moving forward to the next step in their lengthy process.

PUBLIC COMMENTS PART II:
1. Jay Bolt asked if there would be a savings of monies paid to interest if the current County bond would be paid early.

The motion by Greg Hulka, supported by Heidi Tice was carried unanimously, to adjourn the meeting at 9:31pm.

ANDREA ANDERSON, CLERK

HEIDI TICE, SUPERVISOR

New System Allows Residents to View Crime Online

The Ottawa County Sheriff’s Office and Ottawa County Geospatial Insights and Solutions released a new, mobile-friendly incident mapping system last month. The system allows users to search for police activity by date, location and type of incident. Incident types are categorized as traffic and crashes, crimes against persons, health and safety, drugs and alcohol, property, marine and other services. The incidents listed include a basic description of the call and the general area of occurrence. Calls under the jurisdictions of GVSU, Zeeland, Grand Haven, and Holland are included in the system.

The incident mapping system is a transparency tool allowing residents to be better informed and potentially safer in their neighborhoods. Citizens can see what types of complaints Ottawa County has been responding to in their communities.

Users of the system should note that:

• The incidents listed are law enforcement calls for service, and not necessarily cases or substantiated crimes.
• House numbers are truncated and other data is stripped to protect the privacy of individuals.

Find a link to the system at miOttawa.org/sheriff

Fruitport Township Planning Commission Meeting Agenda – 09/18/18

AGENDA

PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP
5865 AIRLINE RD
FRUITPORT, MI 49415

September 18, 2018
6:30 PM WORK SESSION
7:00 PM BOARD MEETING

WORK SESSION

Continue review of ordinances
-Start at 42-210

BOARD MEETING

01. Roll Call
02. Approval of Planning Commission Minutes: August 21, 2018
03. Approval of Planning Commission Special Meeting Minutes: September 5, 2018
04. Approve / Amend Agenda
05. Discussion: Keeping of animals in R-4
06. Public Comments pertaining to agenda topics

New Business
07. Business Registration Ordinance

Old Business
08. Site Plan Review Modification – Chandy Acres East 2239 Mt. Garfield Rd.
Parcel:               61-15-127-2000-0007-40
Purpose:           Modification of approved site plan under section 42-226

09. Public Comments
10. Adjournment

The township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the Township Clerk:
Andrea Anderson
Fruitport Charter Township
5865 Airline Rd, Fruitport, MI 49415
(231) 865-3151.

Increase in Local Cases Legionnaires’ Disease

coughingAugust 23, 2018 – Legionnaires’ disease is more common during the warmer months when temperatures are ideal for bacteria growth. However, regional epidemiologists are seeing an increase in cases in Ottawa, Kent and Muskegon counties. This increase corresponds with state and national increases. No common source has been identified related to the recent cases.

“It is important people are aware of the signs and symptoms of this serious type of lung infection and contact their doctor right away if they become sick,” said Marcia Mansaray, epidemiologist with the Ottawa County Department of Public Health.

legionnairesLegionnaires’ (LEE-juh-nares) disease
Legionnaires’ disease, a type of severe pneumonia (lung infection), is caused by breathing in small droplets of water that contain Legionella. In nature, Legionella live in fresh water and rarely cause illness. In man-made settings, Legionella can grow if water is not properly maintained. In general, people do not spread Legionnaires’ disease to other people.

If you develop pneumonia symptoms and may have been exposed to Legionella, see a doctor right away. Be sure to mention if you have used a hot tub, spent any nights away from home or stayed in a hospital in the last two weeks.   LEARN MORE

Legionnaires’ Disease Can Cause Pneumonia Symptoms
Signs and symptoms of Legionnaires’ disease can include:

• Cough
• Muscle aches
• Fever
• Shortness of breath
• Headache

Doctors use chest x-rays or physical exams to check for pneumonia. Your doctor may also order tests on a sample of urine and sputum (phlegm) to see if your lung infection is caused by Legionella. Legionnaires’ disease is treated with antibiotics (drugs that kill bacteria in the body). Most people who get sick need care in a hospital but make a full recovery. However, about 1 out of 10 people who get Legionnaires’ disease will die from the infection.

Certain People Are at Increased Risk for Legionnaires’ Disease
Most healthy people do not get Legionnaires’ disease after being exposed to Legionella. Being 50 years or older or having certain risk factors can increase your chances of getting sick.

These risk factors include:
• Being a current or former smoker
• Having chronic lung disease, such as emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
• Having a weakened immune system from diseases like cancer, diabetes or kidney failure
• Taking medication that weakens your immune system

Certain People Are at Increased Risk for Legionnaires’ Disease
Outbreaks of Legionnaires’ disease are often associated with large or complex water systems, like those found in hospitals, hotels and cruise ships.

The most likely sources of infection include:

• Water used for showering (potable water)
• Cooling towers (parts of large air conditioning systems)
• Decorative fountains
• Hot tubs

House Passes Effective Legislation

from The Huizenga Huddle: July 25, 2018

Bipartisan Results

Last Tuesday, the House passed the bipartisan JOBS and Investor Confidence Act. This bipartisan package was made up of 32 pieces of legislation, including 3 bills I sponsored to strengthen capital formation, improve investment opportunities for West Michigan residents with 401K’s and IRA’s, and boost small business job creation. I am happy to report this important bipartisan package of bills passed by a vote of 406-4.

To learn more about how this legislation will positively impact our economy, click the image below.

repbillh

Helping Those In Need

Over the past few years, we have seen a rise in the number of individuals struggling to access mental health services and substance abuse programs because of the high cost of care and an overall lack of quality care. After working with the specialists and experts at Pine Rest for more than a year, I introduced H.R. 6343, the INPATIENT Act on July 12th.

This West Michigan inspired legislation modernizes treatment available for Medicare and Medicaid patients to help individuals with urgent mental health care needs as well as those struggling with opioid and substance addiction. H.R. 6343 is designed to address treatment, access, cost and workforce challenges associated with high-need, high-cost patients with behavioral health and substance abuse challenges. To learn more about the INPATIENT Act click here.

repbillhTime and time again, individuals who have just completed inpatient rehabilitation programs are forced to live in housing situations where they are surrounded by people that are using the same illegal substances that sent them to rehab. We have to change that.

A sober, safe, and healthy living environment is essential to recovery. To help people overcome their addiction, the House recently passed the THRIVE Act. This legislation promotes a proven evidence-based approach that has helped thousands of Americans to maintain sobriety after completing rehab, gain valuable jobs skills, obtain employment, and eventually transition back into society to lead independent lives. To learn more about the THRIVE Act and how it will help communities across West Michigan, click the photo above.

Wendy’s Classic Raises $180,000 for Michigan Foster Care Adoption Programs

wendycheck(Jackson, Mich.) – The 18th annual Wendy’s Charity Classic presented by Coca-Cola was held on Monday, August 6 and featured veteran LPGA Tour players now active on The Legends Tour. The event raised over $180,000 for Wendy’s Wonderful Kids and The Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption.

Hosted since 1999 by Jackson resident Elaine Crosby, a two-time champion on the LPGA Tour with one win on The Legends Tour, the pro-am was co-sponsored by Starboard Group and Meritage Hospitality Group, the two largest Wendy’s franchisees in the state with 119 locations combined.

“The Legends players look forward to this event every year,” said Crosby, who recently competed in the inaugural U.S. Women’s Senior Open, a major championship held for women age 50 and over at Chicago Golf Club. “We’re still very active and care very much about this cause. We’ve played in hundreds of pro-ams over the years and this is my favorite for obvious reasons but I can tell you, it’s also high on the list for many of our pros.”

Staged at the Country Club of Jackson on the Pines and Woods courses, the pro-am included such fan favorites as Jan Stephenson, Michelle McGann and Rosie Jones. The 22 LPGA Legends who appeared combined for over 135 wins on the LPGA Tour.

Starboard Group, a Florida-based franchisee with Wendy’s stores in 8 other states, adopted the Wendy’s Charity Classic in 2016 when they purchased Stanton & Associates, Inc. (SAI), a Wendy’s franchisee headquartered in Jackson for 42 years.

“This event means a lot to the kids and to this community,” said Marcos Silva, who co-owns and operates 179 Wendy’s in nine states along with Andrew Levy. “Thanks to the generosity and support of all the sponsors and participants, we are thrilled with the funding we are able to provide to these critical foster care adoption programs.”

Funds raised by the Wendy’s Charity Classic support four Wendy’s Wonderful Kids adoption recruiters in Michigan and northern Ohio. The recruiters focus on children in foster care who have been waiting the longest for a “forever home.”

“Meritage Hospitality Group is proud to have been a co-sponsor with Starboard Group in the 2018 Wendy’s Charity Classic,” said Weston Persons, Brand Manager at Meritage Hospitality Group, a Grand Rapids-based Wendy’s franchisee co-owned and operated by Robert Schermer and Gary Rose. “To date, the event has raised over $3.1 million to help children find forever families, and we know Wendy’s founder, Dave Thomas, would be proud of all of us at Wendy’s for fulfilling his legacy of giving back to the communities where we live and work.”

For more information, visit www.wendyscharityclassic.com.

Muskegon County Calendar of Events Sept.10-17, 2018

Presented by the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau
www.visitmuskegon.org

Monday September 10:

Roll On Muskegon
Mondays @ 6:30 pm
“Roll on Muskegon” is a fun, community, bicycle ride through the neighborhoods of Muskegon. Bikers meet every Monday at the downtown Muskegon Farmers’ Market. This easy 8 mph, family friendly ride begins at 6:30pm. For more information, find them on Facebook.

Team Trivia Game Show
Mondays @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Mondays at 6:30pm, come to Racquet’s Downtown Grill for the Team Trivia Game Show! Groups of any size are invited to play for free with prizes for the top three teams! Categories range from pop culture and entertainment, to sports, history, science, culture and general knowledge. Your live host will also offer many genres of music throughout the game, plus, you’ll enjoy food and drink specials each week. For more information, call (231) 726-4007.

Tuesday, September 11:

From Sea to Your Table with Sofia
September 11 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
This is a sea fish and shell fish class featuring Spaghetti with clams, Impepata di cozze (Mussel soup), capesante alla Veneziana (scallops gratin,) Cuttlefish with peas and you guessed it: Italian Style with Sofia! The cost is $45. For more information, call (231) 769-2202 or visit Eventbrite.com to sign up.

Muskegon Farmers’ Market
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
The Muskegon Farmers’ Market is more than a market, it’s an experience! The summer market season for 2018 is May – November from 8:00am – 2:00pm, Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays. The Flea Market at the Muskegon Farmers’ Market is every Wednesday, May – October from 8:00am – 2:00pm. For more information, call (231)722-3251 or visit muskegonfarmersmarket.com.

Free Planetarium and Science Museum at Muskegon Community College
Tuesdays and Thursdays @ 7:00 pm
Carr-Fles Planetarium, room 135: “Oasis in Space” transports the audience on a startling and beautiful voyage through our universe, galaxy, and solar system in search of liquid water, a key ingredient for life on Earth. This 35-minute program will run August 28 – October 30 on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:00pm. No reservations are needed. John Bartley Science Museum, room 141: (across the hall from the planetarium) has new exhibits on electricity and magnetism. Open 9:00am – 4:00pm on Mondays and Wednesdays, and 9:00am – 7:00pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays so you can visit before the planetarium show. Fridays are by appointment only. For more information, or to schedule a free, private visit for your group, call (231) 777-0289 or email tamera.owens@muskegoncc.edu.

2018 LETR Muskegon Color Run
September 11 @ 6:30 pm
Come to Fricano’s Muskegon Lake to participate in the 2018 LETR Muskegon Color Run! Join law enforcement as they carry the Flam of Hope through Muskegon for the athletes of Special Olympics Michigan. This year’s run will be a color run with 5 color stations and is a 5K Route. They encourage runners and walkers for this event. Registration is $25.00 for anyone over the age of 18. Anyone under the age of 18 will be a suggested donation amount to the event. Pre-race packet pick-up will take place Monday, September 10 from 5:00pm – 7:00pm at Unruly Brewing Co. (360 W. Western Ave.). Registration the day of the event will begin at 5:00pm at Fricano’s and the run will begin at 6:30pm. For run details and to register, visit www.firstgiving.com/miletr/2018muskegon. For more information, contact Ivy Horton at 231-670-5062 or mkgfunrun@gmail.com.

Bestselling Author Beverly Lewis: Book Talk and Signing
Tuesday @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Tuesday, September 11 from 2:00pm – 3:00pm, come to Hackley Library to meet award-winning and bestselling author, Beverly Lewis! She will talk about her latest book release, “The First Love.” This stand-alone novel is set in her beloved Lancaster County, which features a heartwarming romance in Amish country. Her talk will be preceded by a signing where you can meet the author! Copies of “The First Love” will be available for purchase at the event, courtesy of The Bookman bookstore. This program is free to the public and is brought to you through the generosity of the Friends of Hackley Library. For more information, call (231) 722-8000.

Wednesday, September 12:

Muskegon Flea Market
Wednesdays @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
The Muskegon Farmers’ Market is more than a market, it’s an experience! The summer market season for 2018 is May – November from 8:00am – 2:00pm, Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays. The Flea Market at the Muskegon Farmers’ Market is every Wednesday, May – October from 8:00am – 2:00pm. For more information, call (231)722-3251 or visit muskegonfarmersmarket.com.

ArtSmarts! 2018 Fall Lecture Series: Art Glass
September 12 @ 6:30 pm
The Muskegon Friends of Art present their ArtSmarts! 2018 Fall Lecture Series: Art Glass on three Wednesday evenings in September at the Muskegon Museum of Art. This program supports art education at the MMA.
September 12 – Studio Glass: Origins
Speaker: Corey Hampson, President of Habatat Galleries of Royal Oak and President of the Michigan Glass Collecting Alliance

Thursday, September 13:

Michigan Irish Music Festival
September 13 – September 16
The Michigan Irish Music Festival returns to Heritage Landing September 13-16! Back for the 19th year, this festival features continuous music on seven covered stages, including the brand new Belfast Stage, featuring live music, new dining options, beverage offerings, and more. You’ll also love the Celtic Kitchen and Bob and Bernie’s Pub for authentic Irish food and beverages including Irish Fest Stout Irish Cream and others. There’s also the Irish Marketplace children’s activities a cultural center a session tent and tea room. A popular highlight on Saturday is the Michigan FEIS an Irish dance competition held at Muskegon Catholic Central. Sunday morning a Catholic Mass will be held at 9:00am followed by a traditional Irish breakfast. The festival offers an Early-In Free promotion on Friday from 5:00 to 6:00pm. 3-Day passes are also available. For more information visit www.michiganirish.org.

Muskegon Farmers’ Market
Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays @ 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
The Muskegon Farmers’ Market is more than a market, it’s an experience! The summer market season for 2018 is May – November from 8:00am – 2:00pm, Tuesday, Thursdays and Saturdays. The Flea Market at the Muskegon Farmers’ Market is every Wednesday, May – October from 8:00am – 2:00pm. For more information, call (231)722-3251 or visit muskegonfarmersmarket.com.

Crazy About Cauliflower with Chef Char
Thursday @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Did you know that cauliflower makes a great replacement for commonly craved carbs like rice and pasta? In this class, Chef Char will demonstrate how riced cauliflower can replace fried rice in a stir fry. Also try some healthy snacking or creative side dish ideas with Cauliflower Buffalo Bites, Baked Caulitots, Cauliflower tortillas and Garlic Parmesan Cauliflower Steaks. So healthy and so easy! The cost is $40. For more information, call (231) 769-2202. To buy tickets, visit Eventbrite.com.

Free Planetarium and Science Museum at Muskegon Community College
Tuesdays and Thursdays @ 7:00 pm
Carr-Fles Planetarium, room 135: “Oasis in Space” transports the audience on a startling and beautiful voyage through our universe, galaxy, and solar system in search of liquid water, a key ingredient for life on Earth. This 35-minute program will run August 28 – October 30 on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7:00pm. No reservations are needed. John Bartley Science Museum, room 141: (across the hall from the planetarium) has new exhibits on electricity and magnetism. Open 9:00am – 4:00pm on Mondays and Wednesdays, and 9:00am – 7:00pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays so you can visit before the planetarium show. Fridays are by appointment only. For more information, or to schedule a free, private visit for your group, call (231) 777-0289 or email tamera.owens@muskegoncc.edu.

Muskegon Museum of Art: Free Thursday Evening Tours
Thursdays @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Every Thursday from 4:00pm – 8:00pm, Tour the Muskegon Museum of Art for a FREE guided by MMA docents, compliments of Meijer! For more information, call 231-720-2570.

Friday, September 14:

Aquastar Boat Cruise
September 14 @ 7:00pm
Aquastar located at 560 Mart Street, downtown Muskegon is the new name of the formerly known Port City Princess! Hop aboard and get away from the world for an hour and a half as you explore beautiful Muskegon Lake on an afternoon or sunset cruise. As always, a cash bar and light snacks will be available. Ticket price is $20 and kids under 10 are free with adult tickets, visit their website at www.aquastarcruises.com or call 231-903-0669.

Michigan Irish Music Festival
September 13 – September 16
The Michigan Irish Music Festival returns to Heritage Landing September 13-16! Back for the 19th year, this festival features continuous music on seven covered stages, including the brand new Belfast Stage, featuring live music, new dining options, beverage offerings, and more. You’ll also love the Celtic Kitchen and Bob and Bernie’s Pub for authentic Irish food and beverages including Irish Fest Stout Irish Cream and others. There’s also the Irish Marketplace children’s activities a cultural center a session tent and tea room. A popular highlight on Saturday is the Michigan FEIS an Irish dance competition held at Muskegon Catholic Central. Sunday morning a Catholic Mass will be held at 9:00am followed by a traditional Irish breakfast. The festival offers an Early-In Free promotion on Friday from 5:00 to 6:00pm. 3-Day passes are also available. For more information visit www.michiganirish.org.

Yoga at the Light
September 14 @ 9:30 am
Enjoy “Yoga at the Light!” the White River Light Station located at 6199 Murray Rd. in Whitehall. Bring your yoga mats or large towels and water to drink and join SPLKA for Yoga. In case of rain, this event will be rescheduled for September 21. For further information, call Mitch Coleman at White River Yoga at 231-740-6662.

Disenchanted Production
September 14 @ 7:30 pm – September 29 @ 7:30 pm
September 14 – 29 at 7:30pm (Sunday matinees are at 3:00pm), come to the Beardsley Theater for Muskegon Civic Theatre’s production of “Disenchanted!”
Poisoned apples…glass slippers…who needs ’em? Not Snow White and her posse of disenchanted princesses in the hilarious hit musical that is anything but Grimm. Forget the princesses you think you know. When these royal renegades toss off their tiaras, this hilariously subversive, not-for-the-kiddies musical cleverly reveals what really happened ‘ever after’! Tickets are $22 and $20. For more information, call the box office at 231-727-8001.

Saturday, September 15:

Aquastar Boat Cruise
September 15 @ 7:00pm
Aquastar located at 560 Mart Street, downtown Muskegon is the new name of the formerly known Port City Princess! Hop aboard and get away from the world for an hour and a half as you explore beautiful Muskegon Lake on an afternoon or sunset cruise. As always, a cash bar and light snacks will be available. Ticket price is $20 and kids under 10 are free with adult tickets, visit their website at www.aquastarcruises.com or call 231-903-0669.

Disenchanted Production
Through September 29 @ 7:30 pm
September 14 – 29 at 7:30pm (Sunday matinees are at 3:00pm), come to the Beardsley Theater for Muskegon Civic Theatre’s production of “Disenchanted!”
Poisoned apples…glass slippers…who needs ’em? Not Snow White and her posse of disenchanted princesses in the hilarious hit musical that is anything but Grimm. Forget the princesses you think you know. When these royal renegades toss off their tiaras, this hilariously subversive, not-for-the-kiddies musical cleverly reveals what really happened ‘ever after’! Tickets are $22 and $20. For more information, call the box office at 231-727-8001.

Light House Tours
September 15 @ 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm
The Michigan Lighthouse Conservancy is offering tours of the Muskegon South Pierhead Light Saturdays in September from 4:30pm – 7:30pm. The cost is $2 for kids under 12, $3 for veterans and active duty military, and $4 for adults. Private tours can be arranged for $50 per person. For more information, call 844-MLIGHTS or visit www.muskegonlights.org.

Michigan Irish Music Festival
September 13 – September 16
The Michigan Irish Music Festival returns to Heritage Landing September 13-16! Back for the 19th year, this festival features continuous music on seven covered stages, including the brand new Belfast Stage, featuring live music, new dining options, beverage offerings, and more. You’ll also love the Celtic Kitchen and Bob and Bernie’s Pub for authentic Irish food and beverages including Irish Fest Stout Irish Cream and others. There’s also the Irish Marketplace children’s activities a cultural center a session tent and tea room. A popular highlight on Saturday is the Michigan FEIS an Irish dance competition held at Muskegon Catholic Central. Sunday morning a Catholic Mass will be held at 9:00am followed by a traditional Irish breakfast. The festival offers an Early-In Free promotion on Friday from 5:00 to 6:00pm. 3-Day passes are also available. For more information visit www.michiganirish.org.

SJO Supercross
September 15 @ 5:00 pm
Come to the Muskegon County Fairgrounds for motorcycle and quad racing at the SJO Supercross! Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for youth 11 and under. For more information, call (231) 924-5778.

Sweetwater Local Foods Market
September 8 @ 9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Sweetwater Local Foods Market is open year-round, every Saturday from 9:00am-Noon! Healthy! Humane! Homegrown is their pledge to use NO synthetic fertilizers, NO synthetic chemical pesticides or herbicides, no growth promoting antibiotics and NO GMO’s! You can find them in the lobby and parking lot of Mercy Health Lakes Village. For more information, visit www.sweetwaterlocalfoodsmarket.org.

Sunday, September 16:

Michigan Irish Music Festival
September 13 – September 16
The Michigan Irish Music Festival returns to Heritage Landing September 13-16! Back for the 19th year, this festival features continuous music on seven covered stages, including the brand new Belfast Stage, featuring live music, new dining options, beverage offerings, and more. You’ll also love the Celtic Kitchen and Bob and Bernie’s Pub for authentic Irish food and beverages including Irish Fest Stout Irish Cream and others. There’s also the Irish Marketplace children’s activities a cultural center a session tent and tea room. A popular highlight on Saturday is the Michigan FEIS an Irish dance competition held at Muskegon Catholic Central. Sunday morning a Catholic Mass will be held at 9:00am followed by a traditional Irish breakfast. The festival offers an Early-In Free promotion on Friday from 5:00 to 6:00pm. 3-Day passes are also available. For more information visit www.michiganirish.org.

Disenchanted Production
Through September 29 @ 7:30 pm
September 14 – 29 at 7:30pm (Sunday matinees are at 3:00pm), come to the Beardsley Theater for Muskegon Civic Theatre’s production of “Disenchanted!”
Poisoned apples…glass slippers…who needs ’em? Not Snow White and her posse of disenchanted princesses in the hilarious hit musical that is anything but Grimm. Forget the princesses you think you know. When these royal renegades toss off their tiaras, this hilariously subversive, not-for-the-kiddies musical cleverly reveals what really happened ‘ever after’! Tickets are $22 and $20. For more information, call the box office at 231-727-8001.

Retro Expo
September 16 @ 11:00 am – 3:00 pm
You’re invited to the Muskegon Farmers’ Market for the “Retro Expo!” Enjoy an outdoor vintage market filled with vendors selling retro goods and up-cycled items. It’s more than a flea market, it’s a nostalgic shopping experience. For more information, call 231-722-3251.

Brave Hearts Pin-Up Contest @ Retro Expo
September 16 @ 11:00 am – 3:00 pm
The Battlin’ Betties Michigan Platoon will be hosting the first ever Pin-Up Contest at the Retro Expo at the Muskegon Farmers’ Market. They will also have a booth at the expo to share information about Battlin’ Betties and their goal of collecting donated items that will be given to Operation Injured Soldiers. The items they will be collecting are: Toilet paper * Laundry soap *Downey * Snuggle * Cake mixes, brownie mix and canned frosting * K cup pods *Coffee *Paper plates, napkins and paper cups * Dishwasher soap * Cans of pop * Twin, double and queen size sheets * Swiffer wet or dry sheets. Proceeds from the contest will benefit Operation Injured Soldiers, a nonprofit providing recreational opportunities to wounded military veterans of all eras in order to aid in the recovery from physical and emotional injuries sustained during deployments. Please visit their event link for prices, rules and instructions before entering at https://braveheartspinupcontest.eventbrite.com.

Veterans’ Fundraiser
September 16 @ 12:00 pm – 5:00 pm
You’re invited to VFW Post 7729 for a Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser featuring a cash bar, silent auction, bake sale, 50/50 raffle and live music from the Unknown Band! They will also be collecting donations of non-perishable items for the Veterans Food Bank. 50% of the proceeds will benefit the food bank and 50% will benefit Heal with a Horse Therapy Program. For more information, call (231) 788-2998.

Aquastar Boat Cruise
September 16 @ 4:00pm
Aquastar located at 560 Mart Street, downtown Muskegon is the new name of the formerly known Port City Princess! Hop aboard and get away from the world for an hour and a half as you explore beautiful Muskegon Lake on an afternoon or sunset cruise. As always, a cash bar and light snacks will be available. Ticket price is $20 and kids under 10 are free with adult tickets, visit their website at www.aquastarcruises.com or call 231-903-0669.

Monday September 17:

Roll On Muskegon
Mondays @ 6:30 pm
“Roll on Muskegon” is a fun, community, bicycle ride through the neighborhoods of Muskegon. Bikers meet every Monday at the downtown Muskegon Farmers’ Market. This easy 8 mph, family friendly ride begins at 6:30pm. For more information, find them on Facebook.

Team Trivia Game Show
Mondays @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Mondays at 6:30pm, come to Racquet’s Downtown Grill for the Team Trivia Game Show! Groups of any size are invited to play for free with prizes for the top three teams! Categories range from pop culture and entertainment, to sports, history, science, culture and general knowledge. Your live host will also offer many genres of music throughout the game, plus, you’ll enjoy food and drink specials each week. For more information, call (231) 726-4007.

Disenchanted Production
through September 29 @ 7:30 pm
September 14 – 29 at 7:30pm (Sunday matinees are at 3:00pm), come to the Beardsley Theater for Muskegon Civic Theatre’s production of “Disenchanted!”
Poisoned apples…glass slippers…who needs ’em? Not Snow White and her posse of disenchanted princesses in the hilarious hit musical that is anything but Grimm. Forget the princesses you think you know. When these royal renegades toss off their tiaras, this hilariously subversive, not-for-the-kiddies musical cleverly reveals what really happened ‘ever after’! Tickets are $22 and $20. For more information, call the box office at 231-727-8001.

Love Lives Here – 2018 Muskegon Rally
September 17 @ 5:00 – 6:00pm
The second annual “Love Lives Here” rally will bring keynote speaker Molly Barker, founder of “Girls on the Run” and the “Red Boot Way” to Hackley Park in Muskegon. Hackley Park is located at 350 W. Webster in downtown Muskegon. FREE and open to the public!

~

For a complete and updated listing visit www.visitmuskegon.org

Announcing the ATHENA on the Lakeshore Award Finalists

Muskegon, Michigan – The ATHENA on the Lakeshore committee is pleased to announce the 2018 ATHENA Award Finalists and the 2018 ATHENA Young Professional Award Finalists. Celebrating its 14th year, the ATHENA awards are presented annually to recognize outstanding lakeshore women who have demonstrated excellence in their business or profession, provided valuable service by devoting time and energy to improve the quality of life for others in their community, assisted women in reaching their full potential and exhibit the spirit of regional collaboration. This year, we celebrate nine ATHENA Finalists and four Young Professional Finalists.

2018 ATHENA Award Finalists
Zaneta Adams, William Hughes, PLLC; WINC; Lighthouse for Veterans
Mary Boyd, Mercy Health & St. Joseph Health System
Jennifer Bustard, Mona Shores Public Schools
Pam Curtis, Senior Resources of West Michigan
Kimberly Maguire, Mercy Health Muskegon
Julia Rupp, HealthWest
Brianna Scott, Brianna T. Scott & Associates
Chris Stevenson, JW’s and J-Dubs
Barbara Lee VanHorssen, Extended Grace

2018 ATHENA Young Professional Award Finalists
Sara Barco, Weiss Chiropractic
Meghan Heritage, Blue West Properties
Dena Isabell, Consumers Energy
Cece Riley, HealthWest

The ATHENA Award presentation luncheon will be held on Tuesday, October 2, 2018, at Muskegon Country Club. Reservations are required. Cost to attend is $35 per person for chamber members, $55 per person for non-members or $400 for corporate table of eight. A portion of all tickets sales supports local leadership programs. Reservations can be made by visiting www.muskegon.org or by calling the Muskegon Lakeshore Chamber of Commerce at 231.722.3751.

ATHENA on the Lakeshore continues to be a unique program supporting, developing and honoring women leaders along the lakeshore. ATHENA on the Lakeshore is a program of the Muskegon Lakeshore Chamber of Commerce and The Chamber of Commerce Grand Haven, Spring Lake, Ferrysburg. PNC Bank is the premier sponsor.

Finding the Word

Summer comes to an end and the school doors swing open for another year. By necessity dictionaries will be opened for spelling and for the definition of words Of course many will turn to their phones or computers instead of flipping pages . Using a phone book or a dictionary  is for many something of the past. Whatever the means of locating a desired word there is a list somewhere Your dictionary is a valuable source of information.

Daniel Webster, America’s  pioneer lexicographer published his first dictionary, a major contribution to education and communication, in1828. Language continues to change therefore there have been numerous editions of Webster’s dictionary.

Interestingly, when his dictionary was published Webster spoke of a Book greater than his work saying:

“The Moral principles and precepts contained in the Scriptures ought to form the basis of all our civil constitution and laws. All the miseries and evils which men suffer from vice, crime, ambition injustice, oppression, slavery and war proceed from their despising or neglecting the precepts contained in the Bible,”

O that educators and students today would have respect for the Bible and refer to it . The Supreme Court ruled that the Bible could not be used devotionally in our public schools. It may be referred to as literary work and as a historical source for information  It is amazing to see how the history of the Bible intermeshes with secular history Those who are familiar to the Bible are much better educated than those who neglect it. In the early days of America, Ben Franklin was our Ambassador to France. He was a speaker with a lot of creativity and the elite enjoyed social times when he spoke. On one occasion he dramatically  told the story of Queen Esther without identifying it as part of the Bible. The secular audience was unfamiliar with the Bible and were quite surprised when the learned of the source. Many in our schools and society are biblically illiterate , to their loss The Bible is available and can make a great contribution toward the enrichment of individual lives, our communities and nation Finding the right word in a dictionary might meet a special educational need but hearing the Word of God can be life changing.

New Informed Consent Bill Addresses Vaccine-Abortion Connection

Lansing, Mich. — Today Michigan Senate Bill 1055 was introduced to require informed consent for vaccines produced using cell lines taken from aborted babies.

The bill would require the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services to maintain an online list of vaccines produced using tissue from aborted babies, as well as alternative vaccines developed without using such tissue. As part of informed consent, health care providers would be required to provide that information to patients before administering vaccines produced using tissue from aborted babies.

Right to Life of Michigan Barbara Listing said, “The existence of these vaccines requires patients and parents to make important ethical decisions. Sadly, many people are unaware of these facts, including many doctors and nurses. Patients need accurate information to make informed decisions, and many are not getting that now.”

Several current vaccines approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are produced using two cells lines derived from tissue from electively-aborted babies in the 1960s: MRC-5 and WI-38. The cell lines are used to produce the viruses used in vaccines. Most abortion-tainted vaccines have alternatives that are produced using growth mediums derived from animals or other sources.

While the information on vaccine ingredients is readily available on package inserts and from the FDA website, many people are confused by the information they receive in public or from medical professionals.

Listing said, “This bill simply gives people an opportunity to access vaccine information, so they can make choices according to their conscience.”

One of the ethical considerations is that the use of aborted-tainted vaccines encourages the development of new cell lines from future elective abortions.

Listing said, “We should all agree that the existence of alternative vaccines proves it’s unnecessary to take human life to create effective vaccines. Vaccine manufacturers should only use ethical sources for future vaccine production.”

A list of vaccines produced using tissue from aborted babies and alternative options can be found on the Right to Life of Michigan website.

Background Information:
Michigan Senate Bill 1055
Abortion-tainted Vaccines and Alternatives
FDA-approved Vaccines

Fruitport Village Council Meeting Minutes – 08/20/18

VILLAGE OF FRUITPORT
REGULAR COUNCIL MEETING
August 20th, 2018

1. Call to Order
President Roger Vanderstelt called the meeting to order at 7:00pm

2. Pledge

3. Prayer

4. Roll call
Present: Roger Vanderstelt, Donna Pope, Amy Haack, Jay Bolt, Bill Overkamp and Carl Rothenberger who arrived at 7:22pm.
Also present: Jeremy Statler, DPW Supervisor

5. Approval of previous meeting minutes from July 16th council meeting
Motion made by Roger to approve the minutes from the July 16th regular council meeting, supported by Donna. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

6. Approve the agenda for the August 20th Council meeting
Motion made by Roger to approve the agenda, supported by Bill. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

7. Public Comment
None

8. Correspondence (Ann)
None

9. Reports from Officers (Each Council Member)
Donna advised that the library millage will be back on the ballot. It is a renewal of the original amount. The wording gave it the appearance of a new or additional amount. Discussion took place about getting the word out to the community that it is a renewal of the original millage.
Jeff reported that his wife has completed the Master Plan survey spreadsheet. He has shared it with Ann who will email it to Jay for the Planning Commission meeting on Thursday.
Amy discussed two items that were addressed at the last Personnel Committee meeting. Amy stated that Ann requested that we change our Blue Cross Blue Shield insurance agent to Dys Insurance who currently handles our life and disability insurance. There would be no change in the cost of the insurance. Motion made by Amy to change our BCBS agent to Dys Insurance, supported by Donna. Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Overkamp, Bolt, Guiles and Vanderstelt NAYES: None
Amy discussed the second item of making a change to the Personnel Regulations and Procedures. The request is to change the $40.00 stipend for attending meeting to paid time off for the time duration of the meeting during the same week that the meeting took place. Amy read the new wording to the council Motion made by Amy to implement the suggested change to page 11 of the manual, supported by Jay. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.
Amy discussed a grant opportunity with the West Michigan Prosperity Alliance. She is happy to write the grant requesting $40,000 for enhancements at the new property with a boardwalk and trail. She discussed the meeting with the donor. She would like council permission to proceed with the grant request. Motion made by Amy to submit a grant to the WMPA, supported by Roger. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.
Bill had nothing to report.
Jay advised that the Planning Commission did not meet in July. There next meeting is August 23rd. There are 3 open issues thru Section 7. They will start on Section 8. Things should go better with the additional help of the new member of the committee and volunteers.
Roger reminded everyone about the Community Gathering at the Park on Wednesday from 11am – 2pm.

10. Appointment of Planning Commission vacant seat
Roger advised that we received resumes from Connie Smith and John Sigman. Roger would like to appoint Connie Smith to the vacant seat. Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Overkamp, Bolt, Guiles and Vanderstelt NAYES: None

11. 2020 3rd Street Project
Roger explained that Amy and Jeremy have been working on the project. Jeremy gave an overview of the project. The village applied for federal funding to resurface 3rd street. They received a commitment of $200,000. He explained the cost is significant. He has been working with Amy and Matt Hulst an engineer with Prein & Newhoff. Matt Hulst addressed the council and gave a thorough description of the project options. An estimate of Probable Cost for the current project scope, a scope for full reconstruct, sanitary sewer from Oak Street to Park Street and Sanitary Sewer from Park Street to Lift Station (includes Oak and Beech Extensions). A question and answer period took place. Next, Matt Farrar, Public Works Director for Muskegon County, addressed the council. Matt discussed the financial aspects of the project. He stated we could bond through the county, using the county’s full faith and credit for a lower interest rate. Matt provided a spread sheet with the Village’s financial information from the last 13 years. He gave examples of payment options for a bond. He discussed the option of a special assessment for those who hook up to the sewer as a mechanism to pay some of the costs. Much discussion took place. Matt Hulst advised that we need to act by spring of 2019 or earlier to meet the deadlines for the federal funding. Matt Farrar will have a financial advisor provide bond quotes and he suggests getting the community involved. Roger questioned if the council wants to proceed with the next steps. It was decided to move forward with community involvement and getting the financial quotes from the financial advisor. Roger thanked Matt Hulst and Matt Farrar for the information and attending the meeting.

12. Kayak launch
Roger reviewed the discussion and motion that took place in March at the budget meeting regarding the kayak launch. He advised that $5000.00 is in the 2018-2019 budget for the kayak launch. The grant would need to be submitted by April 1st, 2019. Motion made by Roger to approve the engineering fee not to exceed $5000 to proceed with applying for a grant for the kayak launch, supported by Amy. Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp, Bolt, Guiles and Vanderstelt. NAYES: None

13. Boat Launch information station
Roger gave an update on the Boat Launch information station. It will be delivered the week of September 10th. Roger distributed quotes for a picnic table, information board and money box. Roger made a motion to purchase all 3 items not to exceed $2600.00, supported by Amy. Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp, Bolt, Guiles and Vanderstelt NAYES: None

14. MML Convention
Jay would like to attend an additional activity at the convention. The cost of the activity is $30.00. Motion made by Roger to approve the $30.00 cost of the activity, supported by Carl. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried. Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp, Bolt, Guiles and Vanderstelt NAYES: None
Roger read a request from the MML to appoint an official representative from the Village to attend and vote at the Board of Directors meeting at the convention. Motion made to appoint Jay as the representative and Bill as the alternate official, supported by Jeff. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

15. Park Street Chip and Seal
Roger advised the Chip and Seal will take place at the end of the month or next month. Jay questioned getting a quote for paving the area in front of the bank. Roger will put it on the September meeting agenda.

16. Boat launch attendant for Labor Day weekend
Roger made a motion to have the attendant work 10am – 7pm on September 1 thru 3rd, supported by Donna. Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp, Bolt, Guiles and Vanderstelt NAYES: None

17. Beech Street Drain Culvert
Roger distributed pictures of the drain culvert on Beech Street. He gave a description of the repairs needed. Roger made a motion to proceed with the repairs not to exceed $5600 with 30% of the funds from Local Streets and 70% from Major Streets, supported by Donna. Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp, Bolt, Guiles and Vanderstelt NAYES: None

18. Speed Limit signs
Roger discussed the speed limit study that was completed by the Michigan State Police. The Fruitport Township Police have asked that the signs be put in place before students return to school. Amy questioned if we have a recourse regarding the new speed limits. Roger explained the Michigan State police determines the speed limit changes based on the study. Motion made by Roger to have the new speed limit signs put up on August 23rd, weather permitting, supported by Bill. Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp, Bolt and Vanderstelt NAYES: Guiles. With a majority vote the motion carried.
Roger discussed a Motor Vehicle Ordinance that the Township has adopted. He also discussed the Village’s contribution to the Speed and Messaging trailer. A discussion took place about the contribution the Village agreed to make. It was agreed that both items will be on next month’s agenda.

19. Public Comment
None

20. Warrants
Motion made by Donna to approve the warrants, supported by Roger. Roll call AYES: Pope, Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp, Bolt, Guiles and Vanderstelt NAYES: None

21. Adjourn
Motion made by Donna to adjourn the meeting at 9:25pm, supported by Jay. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

Respectfully submitted by,

Ann LaCroix
Clerk

Fruitport Charter Township Board of Trustees Meeting Minutes of August 13, 2018

A work session of the Fruitport Charter Township Board began at 6:30pm on Monday, August 13, 2018, in the township board room.

Members Present: Heidi Tice, Supervisor; Andrea Anderson, Clerk; Rose Dillon, Treasurer; Trustees Todd Dunham, Denise Winebarger, and Greg Hulka
Members Absent: Jeff Jacobs, excused

At 7:00pm, Heidi Tice opened the regular meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance followed by a prayer.

Also Present: 3- residents; 2- employees; 1- guests; Director of Public Safety, Brian Michelli; Director of Public Utilities, Ron Langlois.

The motion by Andrea Anderson, supported by Rose Dillon, was carried unanimously, to approve the minutes of July 23 and August 8, 2018 as presented.

The motion by Denise Winebarger, supported by Greg Hulka, was carried unanimously, to approve the agenda as presented with the following addition:

Unfinished Business- Item 7-C: Mt. Garfield/Maple Island street light approval.

CORRESPONDENCE / REPORTS
1. Heidi Tice shared a letter from a resident regarding interest in purchasing township owned property.
2. Andrea Anderson shared public hearing information for Spring Lake’s master plan update.
3. Andrea Anderson reported that the township has received a check for $1,656.30 from Consumers Energy, this rebate completes the Town Hall LED lighting project.
4. Andrea Anderson shared that 3,409 voters participated in the August 7, 2018 Primary Election.
5. Andrea Anderson shared that Office Machines Company, Fruitport’s copy machine vendor, is now offering IT services.
6. Brian Michelli shared that there will be a school board meeting coming up where the topic of School Resource Officer will be discussed. Brian also shared that the next slip ‘n slide event will take place this Saturday.
7. Ron Langlois reported a progress report on the Broadway water main upgrade; the road will be open in October. The Kuis Drain project is said to be on schedule.
8. Rose Dillon shared that the Fruitport Library Millage failed in the August Primary Election. It is likely that the millage request will be on the ballot again in November.

PUBLIC COMMENTS REGARDING AGENDA ITEMS: none

UNFINISHED BUSINESS:

18-101 Resolution to bond for Muskegon Heights water settlement
The issuance of up to $2,500,000 of bonds to pay the cost of a judgment against the Township.
Heidi Tice moved, Rose Dillon seconded, MOTION CARRIED, adopt the resolution to issue bonds for the purpose of raising money to pay amounts the Township is ordered to pay pursuant to the Judgment and paying the costs of issuing such bonds.

Ayes: Dunham, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger, Hulka
Nays: None

18-102 Authorize signature for Engagement Letter for Ratings Agent for Muskegon Heights water settlement
Andrea Anderson moved, Greg Hulka seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to authorize the Supervisor to sign the letter of engagement from Standard & Poor’s Credit Market Services for use as the Ratings Agent.

Ayes: Dunham, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger, Hulka
Nays: None

18-103 Mt. Garfield/Maple Island street light resolution
Resident, Chuck Whitlow, requested a light be placed at this corner. The cost for adding a single LED streetlight at this location is $100.00.
Heidi Tice moved, Greg Hulka seconded, to adopt the resolution approving the addition of a street light on the SW corner of Maple Island Rd and Mt Garfield Rd, which makes a change in the lighting service as provided in the Standard Lighting Contract between Fruitport Township and Consumers Energy.

Ayes: Dunham, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger, Hulka
Nays: None

NEW BUSINESS:

18-104 Resolution for Attorney’s presents during Mediation
Todd Dunham moved, Denise Winebarger seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to adopt the resolution to ensure the Township Attorney’s attendance at mediations regarding Township business.

Ayes: Dunham, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger
Nays: Hulka

18-105 Resolution to adopt amended investment policy
With changes presented, the Township will now be able to participate in investment pools, giving increased investment choices when CD return rates are low.
Heidi Tice moved, Denise Winebarger seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to adopt the amended investment policy as presented.

Ayes: Dunham, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger, Hulka
Nays: None

18-106 Budget Amendments
Rose Dillon moved, Heidi Tice seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to approve the budget amendments as presented.

Ayes: Dunham, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger, Hulka
Nays: None

18-107 Approval for parking lot sealing and striping
The parking lot surrounding Town Hall is due to be sealed and re-striped. Three bids were collected for a 2-coat seal and restriping: (1) Lakeshore Parking Lot Maintenance $3,611.00, (2) Advanced Sealing & Paving $3,000.00, (3) Weather Mark $5,238.00. The project was anticipated and budgeted for.
Denise Winebarger moved, Heidi Tice seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to approve the town hall parking lot sealing and striping with Advanced Sealing & Paving for the amount of $3,000.00.

Ayes: Dunham, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger, Hulka
Nays: None

18-108 Best Yard Contest
There were 7 submissions. 1901Pontaluna was chosen as the winner.

18-109 Payment of bills
Andrea Anderson moved, Todd Dunham seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to approve bills as presented for payment in the following amounts: General Fund $32,284.88; Public Safety $15,038.17; Water $104,244.92; Sewer $13,387.42; T&A $1,320.00; Street lights $14,736.11
Totaling: $181,011.50

Ayes: Hulka, Winebarger, Dillon, Tice, Anderson, Dunham
Nays: none

ADDITIONAL REPORTS:
1. The Board of Review Alternate position will be filled in December.

PUBLIC COMMENTS PART II:
1. Rick Tice, asked if current resolutions bind the hands of future boards.

The motion by Heidi Tice, supported by Greg Hulka was carried unanimously, to adjourn the meeting at 7:49pm.

ANDREA ANDERSON, CLERK

HEIDI TICE, SUPERVISOR

Ask Dr. Universe – Why Music Gives Us Chills – Part 1

Part 1: Dr. Universe: Why does music give us chills? -Nicole, 11, Spokane, Wash.

Dear Friends,

If you are anything like me, maybe you’ve suddenly felt a chill while listening to music. Perhaps, you got goosebumps and saw your arm hairs stand on end. Maybe you even teared up.

The truth is I really wasn’t sure why music gives us chills, but I was determined to find out. My first stop was the Washington State University School of Music. That’s where I met up with my friend and music professor Greg Yasinitsky.

He played a few different notes on the piano in his office. He told me that if you play three or more notes at once, it’s called a chord.

Major chords tend to make us happy,” he said. “Minor chords are more ominous or sad.”

However, when the music tends to be sad people don’t always describe it as unpleasant, he adds. Just think of an emotional or dramatic part of a movie. Even if the music has more of a sad sound, sometimes it brings about a positive emotion.

Composers will sometimes mix around major and minor chords to play with a listener’s emotions. They also play with things like rhythm, the strong regular repetition of sound, and melody, or the sequence of notes that helps a song sound just right.

Yasinitsky said there seem to be two situations in which people will report feeling the chills. The first is when a listener hears something that is a surprise. Maybe a song has a pretty repetitive pattern, but then something happens that they weren’t expecting.

“That one little change suddenly has this immense importance and for a lot of people could send a chill up their spine,” Yasinitsky said.

Another situation where people might get the chills is when they hear something that is not a surprise. When they finally hear what they’ve been expecting, they might get goosebumps.

Of course, not everyone gets the chills—and different kinds of music may bring out the chills in different people. Either way, most people have an emotional connection to music.

“Pretty much every culture on the planet has music,” Yasinitsky said. “Even those that have outlawed music, they chant, they are still singing. We all need music.”

After chatting with Yasinitsky, I headed across campus to visit the WSU neuroscience department. That’s where I met up with our friend Steve Simasko. He told me more about music, emotions, and the brain. But we’ll explore that next week.

In the meantime, you can try making your own instruments at home. Collect different supplies like rubber bands, popsicle sticks, toilet paper tubes, or other kinds of materials to create your own sounds. Try making a coffee can drum or some maracas. If you are feeling really ambitious, try out a shoebox guitar. Maybe you can play a tune along with your friends. Let me know how it goes at Dr.Universe@wsu.edu.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Lakeshore Art Festival Moves Up in National Ranking!

Muskegon, MI – Sunshine Artist Magazine ranked Lakeshore Art Festival 11th out of 200 other craft shows throughout the nation. The magazine, known for high-quality content in the fine art and craft industry, ranks the nation’s most-profitable fine art and craft festivals based on the sales performance of its’ exhibitors each year. Lakeshore Art Festival has continued to move up in ranking each year starting at #83 in 2015, #27 in 2016 and, now at #11 for 2017.

“Our goal when reinventing the art festival was to focus on quality exhibitors that appealed to local and regional guests,” commented Lakeshore Art Festival Director, Carla Flanders. “Based on survey results and national recognition, we are doing just that! Being one of Sunshine Artist Magazine’s 200 Best signifies that the artists are happy with the event and that guests are buying their unique handmade products. It’s the best of both worlds!”

Sunshine Artist Magazine also referenced Lakeshore Art Festival’s sustainable “green” practices in partnership with the DTE Energy Foundation.

In addition to winning national awards, Lakeshore Art Festival received media from all over the nation this year, ranging as far as Washington and Oregon. The coverage recognized the festival for its one-of-a-kind kayak sculpture art made possible by Sun Dolphin.

This year also marked a record number of exhibitor applicants resulting in the extension of the festival footprint. In addition to the Kayak Sculpture Project, other new successes this year included The Door Project and the Emerging Authors Tent.

Major sponsors for the Lakeshore Art Festival include: DTE Energy Foundation, Sun Dolphin, Betten Baker, Nichols, Arconic, Eagle Alloy, ADAC Automotive, Northern Machine Tool, Staples, Chemical Bank, and Meijer.

Artist and exhibitor registration for the 2019 Lakeshore Art Festival will begin in October. Visit www.lakeshoreartfestival.org for more details.

Community Election Inspector Training

MUSKEGON COUNTY CLERK
Nancy A. Waters, Presents a Community Election Inspector Training
Wednesday, October 3rd , 2018

Election inspectors are people who are paid to assist voters at the polls on Election Day. Join us for a FREE 3-hour training. If the training is completed you will receive a certificate which qualifies you to work any election in the state of Michigan for up to 2 years. Training is offered at 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. or 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Requirements
• Complete and return Election Inspector Application to Muskegon County Clerk, 990 Terrace Street, 1st Floor by 4 p.m. Monday, September 24th
• Registered to vote in Michigan (High school students 16 and older are
eligible)
• Legible handwriting
• Basic computer knowledge
• Bring photo ID to training

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Upcoming Election Dates
• Tuesday, November 6, 2018

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Pick up your application at the Muskegon County Clerk’s office
or at http://www.co.muskegon.mi.us/clerk

Return your application by mail/drop off at the Muskegon County Clerk’s office. Located at 990 Terrace Street, Michael E. Kobza Hall of Justice, 1st floor Muskegon, MI 49442

Election inspectors must commit to working on Election Day from 6 a.m. until approximately 9:30 p.m. or as assigned by municipal clerk

SEATING IS LIMITED! REGISTER TODAY!
REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 24TH, 2018 BY 4 P.M.
MUST PRE‐REGISTER @
http://www.co.muskegon.mi.us/clerk

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Muskegon Innovation Hub at Grand Valley State University
200 Viridian Drive
Muskegon, MI 49442

Fred Meijer Berry Junction Trail Fundraising Goal Nearly Complete

[Muskegon, MI, May 10, 2018] The Fred Meijer Berry Junction Trail Commission is closing in on it’s nearly $2.1 million fundraising goal with a significant contribution from the Consumers Energy Foundation.

Commission members recently accepted a $27,000 grant from the foundation to assist in completing the 4.6 miles of regional trails throughout Muskegon County that help connect two nearby state trails, the Hart to Montague Trail, and the Musketawa Trail.

“The growth in the number of trailways throughout Michigan has provided residents and visitors alike an opportunity to safely enjoy the great outdoors by walking, running or bicycling,” said Brandon Hofmeister, president of the Consumers Energy Foundation. “The Fred Meijer Berry Junction Trail connects several existing paths and will help enhance these healthy activities for Muskegon County visitors and residents. We are pleased to play a role in making this connection.”

Consumers Energy, its foundation, employees and retirees last year contributed over $17 million to Michigan nonprofits. The Consumers Energy Foundation is the philanthropic arm of Consumers Energy, providing funds for education, community, civic and cultural development, social services, the environment, and emerging issues.

This “Phase II” of the trail is expected to be completed this spring and is the culmination of the work between five communities that started in 2003. Represented on the commission are the City of North Muskegon, Muskegon Charter Township, Laketon Township, Dalton Township and Fruitland Township. Other involved groups include the Muskegon County Road Commission, the County of Muskegon, the West Michigan Shoreline Regional Development Commission, the Michigan Department of Transportation, the West Michigan Trails and Greenways Coalition and the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

“The Fred Meijer Berry Junction Trail Commission is very appreciative of the Consumers Energy Foundation’s support,” said Commission Chairman and Dalton Township Supervisor Tony Barnes. “The collaboration of public and private groups supporting this trail is an indication of the widespread support we have received over the years.”

Phase II traverses two townships (Dalton Township and Muskegon Charter Township) and a portion of the City of North Muskegon, where it connects at its southern point to the Center Street/Lake Ave. Trail, and to major regional trails such as the Muskegon Lakeshore Trail, The Musketawa Trail, the Laketon Trail and the North Bank Trail.  At the northern end of the trail, Phase II connects with Phase I at McMillan Road in Dalton Township, and travels 6.1 miles north into the City of Whitehall, and connects with the 22 mile long Hart Montague Bicycle Trail State Park.  There is an existing trail-head with parking and other amenities located at the McMillan Road connection point.

There are also several “spurs” that connect to this trail in its entirety that will allow non-motorized travelers to access the Muskegon State Park and the Duck Lake State Park, as well as many other local parks and recreation areas.  This is the final segment that connects hundreds of miles of existing trails throughout the region and state.

For more information on the Fred Meijer Berry Junction Trail Commission, visit their website at www.berryjunctiontrail.com

Fruitport Township Planning Commission Special Meeting Agenda – 09/05/18

AGENDA

PLANNING COMMISSION SPECIAL MEETING
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP
5865 AIRLINE RD
FRUITPORT, MI 49415

September 5, 2018
7:00 PM BOARD MEETING

BOARD MEETING
01. Roll Call
02. Approve / Amend Agenda
03. Public Comments pertaining to agenda topics

Old Business
04. Site Plan Review / Revision – PCR Properties
Parcel:         61-15-101-300-0003-00
Purpose:     Site Plan Revision-adding loading dock

05. Public Comments
06. Adjournment

The township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the Township Clerk:
Andrea Anderson
Fruitport Charter Township
5865 Airline Rd, Fruitport, MI 49415
(231) 865-3151.

Fruitport Township Board Meeting Agenda – 09/10/18

AGENDA
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP BOARD OF TRUSTEES
FRUITPORT TOWNSHIP HALL
5865 AIRLINE ROAD, FRUITPORT, MI 49415

SEPTEMBER 10, 2018

6:30 P.M. WORK SESSION
7:00 P.M. BOARD MEETING

01. Pledge of Allegiance
02. Roll call
03. Approval of board minutes: 8/27/18
04. Approve / amend agenda
05. Correspondence / reports
06. Public comments regarding agenda items

**Auditor presentation of 2017/2018 fiscal year audit**

07. Unfinished Business
A. Approval to hire a Police Officer
B. Proposed Soccer Park Project

08. New Business
A. Approval for Lion’s Club street corner solicitation

09. Approval of Bills
10. Reports
11. Public Comments
12. Adjournment

The Township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the following Township Clerk: Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Township Hall, 5865 Airline Road, Fruitport, MI 49415 (231) 865-3151

Grand Valley State University Winter 2018 Graduate List

More than 3,000 Grand Valley State University students participated in commencement ceremonies on April 27 and April 28 at Van Andel Arena in Grand Rapids. A list of the names of Grand Valley’s most recent graduates follows.

Students who graduated at the conclusion of the Winter 2018 semester in April include:

Fruitport: Rachel Costa, MSW; Rebeka Johnson, BA; Brianna Routt, BA; Courtney Wagasky, BFA

Muskegon (49444): Dominique Brusven, BSW; Keiarra Guy, BS; Andrea Hall, MED; Laura Hartung, BS; Justin Wierengo, BS; Autumn Winger, BS

Nunica: Matthew Beld, MS; Jeffrey Crouse, BBA; Meredith Kriger, BS; Tyler Vereeke, BS; Phylicia Zarnosky, BS

Ravenna: Weston Bernath, BME; Haley Pearson, BS; Brooke VanDonkelaar, BS; Leslie Venlet, MED

Spring Lake: Tanner Berg, BA; Brianna Brady, BA; Jacob Drelles, BS; Austin Elliott, BS; Catherine Elmore, MSW; Laurie English, BS; Brooke Erickson, BS; Tyler Essenberg, BS; Tyler Fedewa, MSA; Edgardo Fernandez, BA; Padley Gallagher, BS; Margaret Ginocchio, BS; Shelby Kiser, BSW; Katelyn Kovalik, MS; Mae Labrie, BBA; Oksana Lidke, DNP; Emily Marine, BA; Daniel McDonough, BA; Sarah Orleskie, MED; Brenden Peel, BBA; Michael Rice, BS; Zachary Sherwood, BBA; Katelyn Sinn, BSW; Nino Soave, MBA; Victoria Tober, BS; Joshua Tull, BS; Brody Whiting, BBA; Natalie Wilson, BA

Rabid Bat Found in Muskegon County, Residents Reminded of Risk

Muskegon, MI – A bat found in a Muskegon County home has tested positive for rabies. This is the first bat to test positive in Muskegon County in 2018. Two bats tested positive for rabies in Muskegon County in 2017.

According to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Michigan is experiencing an uptick in bats testing positive for rabies this summer. (See July 2, 2018 MDHHS News Release.)

Rabies is a deadly, viral disease transmitted through the bite or scratch of an infected animal. In Michigan, bats are the most common carrier of rabies. Sick bats are more likely to have an encounter with a human or another animal. Sick bats may also display abnormal behaviors such as being active during the day, being found inside a home, or not being able to fly.

Individuals can reduce the risk of exposure to a rabid bat by avoiding picking up or touching bats, keeping rabies vaccinations up-to-date for pets, and bat-proofing the home.

Most individuals will never have contact with a rabid bat, but any direct contact with a bat should be considered a potential rabies threat. Other situations that may present a risk include finding a bat in a room with people who have been asleep, or finding a bat with an unattended child or impaired adult who cannot be sure they didn’t have contact with the bat. In all of these cases, it is important to collect the bat for rabies testing. Post exposure treatment is given to people who are exposed to a potentially rabid bat. Treatment is not necessary if the bat tests negative for rabies.

Muskegon County residents who find a bat in their home should safely confine or collect the bat if possible and call Public Health – Muskegon County at 231-724-1228 to determine if it should be tested for rabies. Information on how to collect a bat safely can be found on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s website.

Godless America

The top U.S. Senate democrat is afraid that President Trump’s nominee to the Supreme Court might be inclined to favor reversal of Roe v. Wade. He and some of his fellow colleagues, want to continue the killing of innocent unborn babies.

Which is a terribly inhumane act that goes against God’s Laws.

They speak of Judge Kavanaugh being tainted, while they are dripping with the blood of the innocent  babies being teared out of women by the thousands every day.

That is how sick and ungodly America has become.  We have judges, senators, and congress members who disobey God and His Ten Commands and Statutes.  Eventually that will bring the wrath of God upon America.

It is a disgrace that they are elected to public offices and placed in judgeships in America.

Manuel Ybarra, Jr.
Coalgate, OK

Muskegon Lake Video Stories Project

The Muskegon Lake Watershed Partnership (MLWP) and the West Michigan Shoreline Regional Development Commission (WMSRDC) are working on a new activity and a new phase of work to help bring information to the public in a new and exciting way.

Conversations among stakeholders have started regarding the delisting of Muskegon Lake as an Area of Concern (AOC).  As the Muskegon community nears delisting, it will be vital to utilize an engaged community of stewards who understand, respect, and will help to maintain the substantial work that has been done in and around the lake over the past several decades.  Engaged citizens will be essential to carry on this environmental ethic into the future to help the Muskegon community continue its interest in maintaining a desirable and healthy lake and watershed.

In order to accomplish this task, the MLWP and WMSRDC are initiating a public outreach project to produce video stories about the environmental history of Muskegon Lake and the work that has been done since being designated as an AOC.  The video will also showcase various community members and stakeholders that utilize the natural resources of the area for their commerce, sustainability, recreation and spirituality.

WMSRDC has contracted with Great Lakes Outreach Media on this project.  We are interested in speaking with people who may recall the early days around Muskegon Lake, post WWII conditions, the days when Muskegon Lake was in a more severely degraded state – or in a more pristine state.  If you or someone you know has an environmental story about Muskegon Lake, we would like to hear from you.  To have your stories considered for this project, find out more about the project and/or learn how you can help or be involved, please send an e-mail to MuskegonLakeStories@muskegonlake.org or contact Kathy Evans at (231) 722-7878 x 17.

Jimmy John’s Serves Up Specialty Sandwiches and More to 400 Local Boys and Girls

jj-bgclubMUSKEGON, MI – Jimmy John’s locations on Apple Avenue and Henry Street teamed up with the Muskegon’s Boys & Girls Club to give 400 area boys and girls a healthy and fun lunch on Thursday, August 16th.

Jimmy John’s local franchise owner, and President of MVK Management, in Norton Shores, Jon Lindenbaum, toured the Boys & Girls Club of the Muskegon Lakeshore (BGCML) and proposed a community outreach partnership earlier this month. His idea was simple, but bold. Bring deserving youth in Muskegon the Jimmy John’s experience by providing club members with a full box lunch including their choice of specialty sandwich, chips, drink and gourmet cookie.

A team headed by Jimmy John’s Area Manager Mike Mangin and Store Managers Jamie Sanborn and Kalob Burr served box lunches at the BGCML’s main Nelson Club Site and at Pere Marquette Beach as part of a field trip coordinated with ReIMagINe Camp. The kids enjoyed their special lunches so much that a BGCML club member named Ramello remarked, “These subs are so good we should give them to the President.” Although BGCML staff members were unsure of the political intentions behind the Ramello’s comment, they interpreted his words to mean “these sandwiches are great!”

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About the Boys & Girls Club of the Muskegon Lakeshore
Since 2015, Boys & Girls Club of the Muskegon Lakeshore has provided mentorship, adult role models, activities, and services to local youth in the areas of education and careers, character building, leadership, health, life skills, arts, sports, fitness, recreation, and several other specialized programs during the summer and afterschool times. Do you have a cool idea on how we can continue to serve Muskegon area youth, or would like to get involved? If so, give Boys & Girls Club teammate, Deborah Santiago a call at 231-375-5576 or email her at DSantiago@BGClubMuskegon.com.

New Grand Haven Dental Center

The Ottawa County Department of Public Health partnered with My Community Dental Centers Inc. (MCDC) to provide greater access to dental care in Ottawa County. A new dental center will open in Fall 2018 at 805 S. Beacon Blvd., Grand Haven. MCDC is operating the six-chair center on behalf of the health department. The center will provide quality dental care to all – children and adults enrolled in Medicaid, Healthy Kids Dental, Healthy Michigan Plan and private dental insurance. MCDC also offers MyDental Program (MyDP) for people without dental insurance, which provides reduced fees based on household income. An initial dental exam with X-rays will cost $39 for new patients. New patients may register now by calling (877) 313-6232 or visiting www.mydental.org.

Services offered:

• Dental exams
• Cleanings
• Fillings
• Tooth removal
• Partials
• Dentures
• and other dental procedures.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, good oral health is an important part of good overall health. Oral diseases—which range from cavities to gum disease to oral cancer—cause pain and disability for millions of Americans. They also cost taxpayers billions of dollars each year. When an oral health emergency strikes, people enrolled in Medicaid or those who are uninsured often go to the emergency room, not a dentist. “This new center is a much-needed service in the community,” stated Debra Bassett, oral health team supervisor for the Ottawa County Department of Public Health. “We look forward to the center’s opening and providing accessible and affordable dental services to residents in Ottawa County who have been unable to find a dentist.”

Results of the 7th Annual Muskegon River Cleanup

Here are the results of the 7th annual Muskegon River Cleanup sponsored by Muskegon River Clean-Up Company, LLC held on August 4th, 2018.  Registration started at 9:30 am at the Bridgeton Launch until noon. We had 519 people register this year, a new record.  These 519 persons collected 4326 cans and bottles , an outboard motor, 1 chair, 1 milk can, 114 flip flops, 22 sunglasses and goggles, 18 lighters, 1 cell phone, 12 tires,1 garbage can, miscellaneous animal bones, scrap iron and treated wood.  At 5:00pm sharp at the Maple Island Launch Site 15 kayaks were given away along with approximately $1000 worth of miscellaneous items to the participants.  Hot dogs and hamburgers were provided to the participants throughout the day.  Next years event will be on Saturday, August 3, 2019.  Hope to see everyone there.

John Cramblet
Member, Muskegon River
Clean-Up Company, LLC

Food Forward FARM Incubator/Manufacturing Facility to Open in Downtown Muskegon

(Muskegon, MI) – Another development is in the works for Muskegon County starting this fall, 2018. Joining the over $1 billion in investments is the new Food Forward FARM (Food, Agriculture, Research & Manufacturing) Incubator/Manufacturing Facility, located at the former Muskegon Farmer’s Market on 731 Yuba Street.

This Brownfield Redevelopment Project is a collaboration with CorePark Development and the West Michigan Shoreline Food Processing Initiative. The Initiative was established in 2017 to promote the expansion of the food processing industry in West Michigan including incubation and product development.

The planned food processing facility will offer food-grade industrial space with individual suites ranging from 5,000 sq. ft. to 20,000 sq. ft. The space is designed to offer lease options for entities ranging from fast-growing start-ups to well-established companies in the food industry.

This facility is ideally suited for a variety of food and agricultural-based businesses:

• Dairy
• Food Research
• Fruit & Agriculture
• Beverage & Distillery
• Food Manufacturing & Packaging
• Stage 1 – Start-ups
• Stage 2 – Ready-to-grow, short-term pilot space
• Professionals providing support to the food industry (general office, educational training, etc.)

The development of Food Forward FARM is separated into three phases.

Phase I – 40,000 – 50,000 sf dedicated to the main facility, collaboration center, and a pilot space available for short duration / product launch use.
Phase II – Additional 20,000 – 30,000 sf
Phase III – Additional 40,000 sf (freezer storage)

Phase I is currently available for lease in the following price ranges:

Processing Space –  $5.50 – $7.00 psf
Office Space – $12.00 – $15.00 psf

For more information or leasing details, please contact Bryan Bench or Troy Wasserman of Core Realty. www.CORErealty.com/food-forward-farm

For more information about the West Michigan Shoreline Food Processing Initiative, please visit www.westmifoodprocessinginitiative.com or www.facebook.com/WestMIFoodProcessingInitiative