Monthly Archives: September 2019

Fruitport Board of Education Regular Monthly Meeting Minutes – 09/16/19

Fruitport Board of Education
Regular Monthly Meeting
September 16, 2019 7:00 p.m.
High School Media Center

I. The Regular meeting of the Board of Education was called to order at 7:00 p.m. by Board President, Dave Hazekamp.

II. The PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE was recited.

III. ROLL CALL: Present – Jill Brott, Tim Burgess, Kris Cole, Susan Franklin, Dave Hazekamp, and Steve Kelly.
Absent – Elroy Buckner.

IV. APPROVAL OF AGENDA
Item 19-124. MOTION by Hazekamp, SECOND by Cole to approve the agenda with the addition of General Board Business, Transfer of Funds (Item X -1 ).
MOTION CARRIED 6-0

V. PRESENTATIONS
High School Principal, Lauren Chesney welcomed board members, the community, and staff to the board meeting. She spoke about hiring a Graduate Advocate and the Big Move which will be happening when students move into the new academic structure in January of 2020.

Secretary of the Fruitport Planning Commission and Member of the Village Council, Jay Bolt addressed the board regarding a zoning issue. He stated that there is an error indicating parcel #41-150-007-0001-00 belonging to Fruitport Community Schools is incorrectly zoned as “institutional” when in fact, the Village Land Use ordinance Chapter 6 does not have an approved zone entitled “institutional”. There will be a public hearing in October with more information on this subject.

VI. COMMUNICATIONS
None.

VII. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC
None.

VIII. SUPERINTENDENT/ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS
None.

IX. CONSENT AGENDA
Item 19-125. MOTION by Brott, SECOND by Franklin to approve the Consent Agenda as listed below:
1. Approval of Special Meeting Minutes of August 26, 2019
2. Acceptance of Bills, Monthly Financial Report, and ACH Transactions
3. Acceptance of Student Activity Summary Report
4. Acceptance of Credit Card and Utilities Report
5. Approval of Capital Projects Progress Report
6. Approval of the Personnel Report
MOTION CARRIED 6-0

X. GENERAL BOARD BUSINESS
1. Other – Transfer of Funds.
Item 19-126. MOTION by Franklin, SECOND by Cole to approve the transfer of $126,439.68 from the Bond Fund to the General Fund for Art and Stem furniture as presented.
MOTION CARRIED 6-0

XI. BUSINESS AND FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Report of committee meeting held September 9, 2019.
Kris Cole reported on a Business and Finance Committee meeting held September 9, 2019. Dave Hazekamp, Elroy Buckner, Kris Cole, Bob Szymoniak, John Winskas, and Mark Mesbergen were present. The committee discussed merit pay, an audit update, a fence issue at Shettler, and a Cash Flow Resolution.

2. Authority to Borrow Funds.
Item 19-127. MOTION by Cole, SECOND by Franklin to adopt the Cash Flow resolution as presented. Roll Call: Burgess, Yes; Brott, Yes; Cole, Yes; Franklin, Yes; Hazekamp, Yes; Kelly, Yes. Absent – Buckner.
MOTION CARRIED 6-0

XII. PERSONNEL COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Report of committee meeting held September 9, 2019.
Steve Kelly reported on a Personnel Committee meeting held September 9, 2019. Dave Hazekamp, Tim Burgess, Steve Kelly, and Bob Szymoniak were present. The committee discussed a faith community liaison, a graduation advocate, merit pay, and a local scholarship opportunity.

2. Principal/Assistant Principal Merit Pay.
Item 19-128. MOTION by Kelly, SECOND by Burgess to approve the 2019/20 Merit Pay/Incentive for the principals and assistant principals as presented.
MOTION CARRIED 6-0

XIII. STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Nothing to report.

XIV. BOARD MEMBER REPORTS AND DISCUSSIONS
Steve Kelly commented on how well the band performed at the Sparta event on September 14th.

Kris Cole invited everyone to attend “ROBOCON” at the Lakes Mall on September 28th. This event will showcase local robotics teams.

XV. AGENDA ITEMS for FUTURE MEETINGS & SCHEDULING OF ANY SPECIAL MEETINGS
1. A Board Workshop is scheduled for Sept. 25, 2019 at 6:00 p.m.
2. Business and Finance Committee will meet Oct. 14, 2019 at 11:30 a.m.
3. Personnel Committee will meet Oct. 14, 2019 at 5:00 p.m.
4. Student Affairs Committee will meet Oct. 16, 2019 at 12:00 p.m.

XVI. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC
None.

XVII. ADJOURNMENT
Item 19-129. MOTION by Franklin, SECOND by Cole to adjourn.
MOTION CARRIED 6-0

The meeting adjourned at 7:32 p.m.

Respectfully submitted,

Steve Kelly
Board Secretary

Maribeth Clarke
Recording Secretary

Ask Dr. Universe – Why People Dance

Dear Dr. Universe: Why do we dance? – Helen H., 11, California

Dear Helen,

If we traveled around the world, we would see all kinds of dancers. We might see classical ballerinas in Russia. We might see break dancers performing on the streets of New York. We might even see tango dancers in Argentina.

While the exact reasons we dance remain a mystery, there are a few theories about it.

That’s what I found out from my friend Ed Hagen, an anthropologist at Washington State University who has researched the roots of dance.

In nature, we actually see a lot of animals dancing. It’s not just humans. Bees do a kind of waggle dance where they step  in a figure-eight pattern. This movement helps them communicate important information. It lets other bees know where to find the best pollen to make honey.

Birds, especially male birds, will often flutter their bright and beautiful feathers to attract a mate. Dolphins will also make graceful leaps together and twirl around in the ocean to attract a partner.

This process of using dance to find a mate is part of something called courtship, Hagen said. Dance may also be part of courtship in humans, too. A good dance could be a signal that your partner is intelligent, has the ability to perform a skill, and might even be able to pass these traits down to the next generation.

Of course, people still dance even if they aren’t looking for a mate. One other idea about why humans dance is that early humans used movement to signal that a certain place was part of their territory.

A lot of animals, like lions and coyotes, also use movement or sound to signal to others: “This is our land. Don’t mess with us.”

While dancing may be rooted in courtship or protecting what’s yours, we dance for many reasons today: celebration, competition, and even exercise.

I also talked to my friend Kaila Evenoff, coach of the WSU Crimson Girls dance team, to find out more about it.

“Dance is a form of expression and a form of art,” she said. “We can convey our emotions into movement without talking.”

We can plan, or choreograph, these movements, too. When the team performs at football games, they help lift the crowd’s spirits. They also compete against other dance teams around the country to see who has the best skills.

Even if you aren’t a professional dancer, dancing can be a good form of exercise, too. It helps the body produce endorphins, or brain chemicals that make us feel happy.

“It is really enjoyable,” Hagen said. “That opens the question, why is it enjoyable?”

The types of dances we do change throughout time, too. In fact, humans come up with new dance moves all the time. I’ll have to see if I can come up with any good ones.

Maybe one day you can put on your dancing shoes and thinking cap to help us learn even more about what it means to dance.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Fruitport Township Board Meeting Agenda – 09/23/19

AGENDA
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP BOARD OF TRUSTEES
FRUITPORT TOWNSHIP HALL
5865 AIRLINE ROAD, FRUITPORT, MI 49415

SEPTEMBER 23, 2019

6:30 P.M. WORK SESSION
7:00 P.M. BOARDMEETING

1. Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States
2. Rollcall
3. Approval of board minutes: 9/9/19
4. Approve/amend agenda
5. Correspondence/reports
6. Public comments regarding agenda items

7. Unfinished Business
A. Police Special Assessment District
B. Second Reading: 2018 Edition of the International Fire Code Ordinance
C. Second Reading: Zoning Text Amendment Ordinance to prohibit recreational marihuana
establishments

8. New Business
A. Mt Garfield road project

9. Approval of Bills
10. Reports
11. Public Comments
12. Adjournment

The Township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the following Township Clerk: Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Township Hall, 5865 Airline Road, Fruitport, MI 49415 (231) 865-3151

Public Health Nurse Receives Award for Challenging TB Case in Ottawa County

Patty Feenstra received the 2019 Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) TB Warrior Award for her exceptional work with a very complex and challenging case of drug resistant tuberculosis. Patty has been a nurse for 43 years and has been working as a TB nurse for the Ottawa County Department of Public Health (OCDPH) eight of those years. This award was given at the 2019 MDHHS World TB Day Conference in Lansing, where she also presented Notes from the Field.

“Patty provides exceptional and compassionate care to Ottawa County residents with tuberculosis,” stated Tamara Drake, OCDPH communicable disease supervisor. “Patty always goes above and beyond to make sure they complete the necessary treatment.”

pfeenstra“Receiving the MDHHS TB Warrior Award at the 2019 MDHHS World TB Day Conference was a special honor for me and I appreciated the recognition for doing the work that I am passionate about,” said Patty. “I am proud to be part of a great team here at the Ottawa County Department of Public Health and at the MDHHS TB Control Program that provides awesome care for the TB patients of Ottawa County.”
pfeenstra@miottawa.org

Where Does America Stand on Abortion?

Abortion is all over the news lately. Sadly, many of these stories give people an incomplete picture of abortion. Before we discuss what Americans believe, we should reflect on what they don’t know.

We must start with Roe v. Wade, which keeps abortion legal in America by blocking enforcement of any significant ban on abortion. Many people falsely believe the abortion bans recently passed in several states have gone into immediate effect. What is needed is a basic civics refresher on how our judicial system works. Roe v. Wade continues to block every significant abortion ban until the U.S. Supreme Court overturns it.

Doe v. Bolton was an abortion case decided by the Supreme Court on the same day as Roe v. Wade. The “health” exception for abortion mentioned so frequently was defined in Doe v. Bolton to include essentially everything. Thus, Roe and Doe together keep abortion legal for every reason throughout all nine months of pregnancy by blocking enforcement of abortion bans.

Few have heard of Doe, and thus most have no idea what Roe really does. Asking people what they think about Roe is about as effective as asking them what they think about admiralty law and the 2008 court case United States v. Approximately 64,695 Pounds of Shark Fins (the shark fins won, by the way).

We continue to see a pattern of a woefully misinformed public. Most people think late-term abortions are performed for actual health reasons, but most are actually for economic or social reasons. Most people think millions of women died before Roe v. Wade from illegal abortions, even though the Washington Post called out Planned Parenthood recently for that data-free claim.

Truthfully, most Americans want to avoid abortion. They don’t understand it.  Most seem uncomfortable with entirely banning it, yet recoil in horror when abortion truths manage to reach them.

A clear picture emerges when polling companies like Gallup break down abortion questions by reasons and pregnancy trimesters. A majority of Americans would ban abortions for social or economic reasons, meaning more than 90% of abortions that occur today would be illegal if the views of the American people controlled our laws. An even larger majority of Americans would ban late-term abortions.

Our petition drive to ban the late-term dismemberment abortion procedure in Michigan will enjoy broad support; the procedure is so horrific that to merely describe it is to oppose it.

Chris Gast
Director of Communication/Education
(616) 532-2300 | RTL.org

FCS – Business and Finance Committee Meeting Minutes – 09/09/19

Business and Finance Committee
Monday, September 9, 2019
11:30 a.m., Superintendent’s Office
Meeting Minutes

Attendance: Dave Hazekamp, Elroy Buckner, Kris Cole, Bob Szymoniak, John Winskas, and Mark Mesbergen

1. Merit Pay
Mark and Bob discuss the recommendation for the change in the merit pay structure for the building administrators. This will be presented at the Personnel Committee.

2. Audit Update
Mark presented an audit update. The prelim report has not been produced but Mark gave an update. The final audit report will be presented at the next Business and Finance Committee.

3. Other – Shettler Fence
John presented an update on the fence issue at Shettler Elementary.

4. Other – Cash Flow Resolution
Mark gave an update on Fruitport’s cash flow. Mark recommends the board take action on a resolution giving Bob and Mark the authority to borrow money for cash flow. Mark is not sure if the district would need to borrow due to when property taxes would be received but Mark felt this is something that could be done ahead of time to save time if there was a need to borrow.

Meeting adjourned at 12:28 p.m.

Respectfully submitted by Mark Mesbergen

FCS – Personnel Committee Meeting Minutes – 09/09/19

Personnel Committee
Monday, September 9, 2019
5:00 p.m. ~ Superintendent’s Office
MEETING MINUTES

Attendance: Dave Hazekamp, Tim Burgess, Steve Kelly, Bob Szymoniak

1. The concept of a “faith community liaison” was discussed. The main role of this position would be to facilitate the mentorship program which last year placed 35 mentors in our schools. The position would also serve as a conduit between the school system and the faith community for future collaborative ventures.

2. The position of Graduation Interventionist Advocate was discussed. This position would be ½ time Adult Education teacher paid for out of the Adult Education budget, and ½ time Graduation Intervention Advocate which would be paid for out of At Risk funds. The Advocate would work with primarily 9th and 10th graders who are at academic risk of failure, and do what is necessary to help them achieve passing grades and earn credit. We have found that when students become juniors and are behind on credits toward graduation, the odds of them graduating are greatly diminished. This position has been posted and action will be taken on an upcoming consent agenda to fill this position.

3. Principal/Assistant merit pay was discussed. The details of the 2019/20 Merit Pay plan will be included in the September board packet. This plan will be on the agenda for board action.

4. A brief discussion was held regarding a local scholarship opportunity that our students have not historically applied for. It was shared that this situation would likely improve in the near future.

Meeting adjourned at 5:55 p.m.

Respectfully submitted by Bob Szymoniak

Muskegon County Calendar of Events 09/16/19 – 09/23/19

Presented by the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau
www.visitmuskegon.org

Ongoing Events:

Planetarium Show: Supervolcanoes
“Supervolcanoes” is a free, 30-minute planetarium show that looks at a rare class of large volcanic eruptions on Earth and other planets. See it Tuesday and Thursday evenings at 7:00pm through October 31 at Muskegon Community College, room 1072.  No reservations are needed; this is walk-in only.  Be sure to come early and check out the new “World of Water” exhibit before the show, at the John Barley Science Museum in room 1073, across the hall from the planetarium.  The museum is open until 7:00pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays; allow 20-30 minutes.  For more information, or to schedule a private show for groups of 15 or more, call 231-777-0289.

Muskegon South Pierhead Light Tours
Tour the Muskegon South Pierhead Light Saturdays in September and October from 2:00pm – 5:00pm, Memorial Day through Labor Day! For more information call 1-844-MLIGHTS.
Docent-led Tower Tours Admission:
• $2 – Kids 11 and under
• $3 – Military and veterans
• $4 – 12 and up
Please note: Children must be at least 3 feet tall in order to climb. Sturdy shoes are recommended.  Contact muskegonlights@gmail.com to book a private tour of the Lighthouse with one of their knowledgeable history docents. The cost is $50 a person for up to ten people for sunset or any time of day you desire.

Pigeon Hill Brewing Co: Monday Night Bike Ride
Monday evenings, beginning at 6:00pm, come to Pigeon Hill Brewing Co. to join in a group bicycle ride!  The goal is for everyone to start and finish together for a total ride time of 90 minutes. Please arrive early.  The ride begins promptly at 6:00pm.  You’ll travel from Pigeon Hill to Pere Marquette Beach via the Lakeshore Bike Trail (10-11 miles).  For more information call (231) 375-5184.

Team Trivia Game Show
Mondays at 6:30pm, come to Racquet’s Downtown Grill for the Team Trivia Game Show!  Groups of any size are invited to play for free with prizes for the top three teams!  Categories range from pop culture and entertainment, to sports, history, science, culture and general knowledge.  Your live host will also offer many genres of music throughout the game, plus, you’ll enjoy food and drink specials each week.  For more information, call (231) 726-4007.

Roll On Muskegon
Roll On Muskegon is a casual, family friendly, community bike ride on the streets of Muskegon. Every Monday night we leave as a group from the downtown Muskegon Farmer’s Market to visit and explore a different neighborhood of Muskegon.
• When: Every Monday night. Wheels turn at 6:30pm
• Where: Meet at the Muskegon Farmer’s Market
• Speed: Casual, 8-10 mph
• How Long: Approx. 90 minutes

Muskegon Farmers’ Market & Flea Market
The Muskegon Farmers’ Market, owned and operated by the City of Muskegon, is dedicated to showcasing the best in locally-grown foods, flowers, nursery stock, handicrafts and baked goods. The Market also hosts The Flea where everything imaginable is sold.
Farmers’ Market summer hours are Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays from 8:00am – 2:00pm. The Flea Market is Wednesdays from 8:00am – 2:00pm.  For more information call 231-722-3251 or visit www.muskegonfarmersmarket.com.

Montague Farmers’ Market
The Montague Farmers’ Market opens the first Saturday in June and runs every Saturday through October. The Market is also open on Wednesdays in July, August, and September.  Market hours are from 9:00am – 1:00pm.  Any farmer or baker who is interested in selling goods at the Market should contact Farmers’ Market Manager, Jeff Auch at City Hall at 231-893-1155 ext. 1757 to check if any booths are available.

Sweetwater Local Foods Market
Sweetwater Local Foods Market offers healthy, humane, homegrown, local food you can trust! They are open year-round, Saturdays from 9:00am – 12:00pm.  Summer markets are held in the parking lot; winter markets are inside the lobby.  For more information, visit www.sweetwaterlocalfoodsmarket.org.

Fetch Cycling Group
Meet in the parking lot behind Fetch Brewing Company on Thursdays at 6:00pm for a 60 minute No Drop Bike Ride. All abilities and fitness levels are encouraged and welcome.  Helmets are strongly encouraged.  Fetch Brewing Company provides you with the added incentive of $1 off your first post-ride beer!

Sweet Saturdays at the Lakeside Emporium
Join the Lakeside Emporium on Saturday afternoons from 12:00pm – 4:00pm to enjoy food, entertainment, and “Treasure Alley” – a collection of vendors ranging from artists and authors to crafters, collectors, and even pottery demonstrations, all conveniently located on-site at the Lakeside Emporium.  It’s family fun and enjoyment for all ages, and an opportunity to find just the perfect treat or gift for yourself or someone else. Enjoy the experience, delicious products, and great customer service at the Lakeside Emporium, and check out all the other wonderful businesses in Lakeside.  For more information call 231-755-9933.

USS Silversides Submarine Museum Fall Lecture & Film Series
Lectures will be presented every Monday through November 4 at 6:00pm. The cost is $5.00 per person per lecture or FREE with your USS Silversides Submarine Museum membership.  In addition to the lectures, for one week prior to each lecture, they will be showing a film on a related subject. Movies will be shown daily at 1:00pm.  The cost to attend the movie is included with your $6 admission ticket to the museum.  Admission to the museum is also FREE with your USS Silversides Submarine Museum membership.  For more information call (231) 755-1230.

Special Events:

The Art and History of the Celts
September 16 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
September 16 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm, come to the Sturrus Technology Center lobby at Muskegon Community College for the free lecture series, “The Art and History of the Celts!” Instructor Tim Norris with guest presenter Michael Johnson will explain where and when Celtic art and culture originated.
They will answer such questions as: Who are the Celts? What traits make their art significant?  How has Celtic art and culture changed over time?  How does their art reflect their unique spiritual beliefs and traditions?  What vestiges of Celtic culture have survived to this day?  What was Ireland’s distinctive role in preserving this heritage?  For more information, contact tim.norris@muskegoncc.edu or call 231-777-0344.

Ballet Nepantla: Valentina
September 18 @ 6:00 pm
Wednesday, September 18 at 6:00pm, come to the Frauenthal Center for Performing Arts for “Valentina!” Ballet Nepantla presents Sin Fronteras, a synergistic celebration crossing geographic, historical and artistic borders.  Sin Fronteras explores the in-betweenness of cultures within the realm of dance, harmonizing traditional Mexican Folklorico, contemporary & classical Ballet, and West African dance in a way no other show has done.  For more information, call the box office at 231-727-8001.

Henna & Hops
September 18 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Wednesday, September 18 from 6:00pm – 7:30pm, come to Fetch Brewing Co. for Henna & Hops! Grab a friend and adorn yourself with henna! Henna is a dye that creates a temporary tattoo and can be applied to your skin. You’ll be able to create your own design, grab some ideas from the instructor, or use a stencil. Registration is required. This is for ages 15 and up and the cost is $20.  For more information call the Arts Council of White Lake at (231) 893-2524.

After Hours Tours at Hackley Public Library
September 19 @ 4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Dive into history and learn details about Hackley Public Library during an ‘After-Hours’ tour on Thursday, September 19!  Visitors are asked to arrive at 4:45pm to gather in HPL’s lower level meeting rooms, then the guided tour will begin at 5:00pm.  Please park in the rear parking lot as the front doors will be locked.  Tours will be approximately 1 hour.  These tours are FREE, open to the public, and recommended for all ages. Call (231) 722-8000 with any questions.

Opening Event – The Land: The Art of Bill Hosterman and Ed Wong-Ligda
September 19 @ 5:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Thursday, September 19 from 5:30pm – 8:00pm, come to the Muskegon Museum of Art for the opening event of “The Land: The Art of Bill Hosterman and Ed Wong-Ligda! ‘ Explore the exhibit, and then enjoy a lecture by the artists at 7:00pm.  This event is free and open to the public.  For more information call 231-720-2570.

Jazz Night: Checkers Morton
September 19 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Thursday, September 19 from 7:00pm – 9:00pm, come to the Book Nook & Java Shop for Jazz Night featuring Checkers Morton!  For more information call 231-894-5333.

Yoga at the Light
September 20 @ 9:30 am
Friday, September 20 at 9:30am it’s Yoga at the Light with Mitch Colman. The rain date will be September 27.  For more information call Mitch Coleman at White River Yoga 231-740-6662.

3rd Annual Golftoberfest
September 20 @ 11:00 am – 5:00 pm
Friday, September 20 from 11:00am – 5:30pm, come to Lincoln Golf Club for the 3rd Annual Golftoberfest! This is a Bavarian inspired event for golfers and a fundraiser to support year-round recreation at the Winter Sports Complex.  Last year, your support of this event helped them to reach their goal to fund phase 1 of the dual mega zip line. Over the last year, they have begun planning for the zip line buildout with ground breaking scheduled for this fall. All proceeds from this event will benefit the next phase to provide year-round recreation.
Format:
This is a 4 person scramble that will commence with an 11:00am shotgun start. Each person hits a shot and the team takes the best shot.  This process is repeated until the hole is finished.  Men under 65 play from the black tees.  Men 65 and older play from silver tees.  Women play from the gold tees.
Registration:
The first 15 teams registering before August 30 will receive a $50 discount, so don’t delay!  Register at Eventbrite.com.

Pianos for Paws
September 20 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Friday, September 20 from 6:00pm – 9:00pm, come to the Polish Falcon Club for Pianos for Paws! This is a 5 Piece Dueling Piano show benefitting the Humane Society and Animal Rescue of Muskegon County!  Tickets are $20 and available through Eventbrite.com.  For more information call the club at (231) 755-1451.

Hackley & Hume Historic Site: All Access Tours
September 20 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Every third Friday of the month from 7:00pm – 8:30pm, you can go where no visitor has gone before on All Access Tours of the Hackley & Hume Historic Site! Explore behind closed doors including attics, porches, and basements of both houses.  Enjoy different themed topics such as restoration, preservation, family stories, new discoveries in the research, the Hackley House during the Red Cross years, the Hume home as a Daycare Center, as well as future projects.  Please RSVP by calling 231-722-7578.  The cost is $20 or $15 for members.

Live Music: Silverado
September 20 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Friday, September 20 from 7:00pm – 9:00pm, come to the Book Nook & Java Shop for live music from the Silverado Band!  For more information call 231-894-5333.

Princess & Superhero Weekend at Lewis Farms & Petting Zoo
September 21
Saturday and Sunday, September 21 – 22, bring the kids to Lewis Farms & Petting Zoo for the Princess & Superhero Weekend!  Visit with their special costumed characters as you explore all the fun on the farm this weekend!  For more information call 231-861-5730.

231 Snow & Car Show
September 21 @ 10:00 am – 6:00 pm
Saturday, September 21 from 10:00am – 6:00pm, come to Mt. Garfield for the 3rd annual “231 Snow & Car Show!”  This snowmobile and car show features snowmobile, dirt bike and quad riders doing stunts all day, a car show and swap meet, as well as a skydive jump from Skydive Grand Haven!  This is a family friendly event with a bounce house for the kids and many sponsors giving away all kinds of cool items, from coolers to GPS units!  Muskegon Motorcycle Club will be there giving away a golf cart as well.  Gates open at 10:00am and the first show is at noon.  Tickets are $15 with kids 12 and under free.  For more information call 231-736-7166.

Muskegon Heritage Museum’s Community Days
September 21 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm
Enjoy one of Muskegon’s “Amazing Museums” for free during Muskegon Heritage Museum’s Community Days!
The Heritage Museum is dedicated to preserving the economic, industrial and social history of the greater Muskegon area.  Their collection includes informational exhibits, artifacts and photos pertaining to Muskegon’s industries, historic homes and businesses.  They have a working steam engine with a line shaft that runs 11 machine tools as well as a working Brunswick pinsetter, a spring winding machine, and over 80 other companies represented in exhibits.  Don’t let the modest storefront fool you, the museum has over 12,000 square feet of display space, spanning three floors!
Each “Community Day” will have a special theme:
• September 21 – Kaydon Engineering
• October 19 – Swanson Pickles and pickle tasting
For more information call 231-722-1363 or visit www.muskegonheritage.org.

Dinosaur Dig
September 21 @ 11:00 am – 2:00 pm
Saturday, September 21 from 11:00am – 2:00pm, bring your family down for a FREE fun adventure at the Western Market in downtown Muskegon! Dig through the sand to find dinosaur toys, fossils, and eggs.  Find one of the 30 golden eggs and win a prize bag full of goodies from Tatterweave Designs!  You may even spot a live T-Rex!  For more information call (231) 724-6705.

Tacos 4 Tails
September 21 @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Saturday, September 21 from 4:00pm – 8:00pm, come to the Mona Lake Boating Club for Tacos 4 Tails! Enjoy a delicious taco dinner and support the West Michigan Spay and Neuter Clinic and the wonderful work they do.  There’ll also be an on-site auction with terrific items available!  Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for kids 10 and under and available at the door.  For more information call (231) 366-7067.

Speakeasy at the LMC
September 21 @ 6:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Saturday, September 21 from 6:00pm – 10:00pm, join the Lakeshore Museum Center for a night of booze, gambling and good eats! Dress in 1920’s style and spend an evening in support of the LMC. Flappers and gangsters welcome!  Tickets are $50 and available through Eventbrite.com.  For more information call (231) 722-0278.

WLCS 98.3FM Jukebox Party Cruise
September 21 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm $25.00
Saturday, September 21 from 6:30pm – 9:30pm, board the Aquastar for a WLCS Jukebox Party Cruise!
“Sit right back and you’ll hear a tale, a tale of the Aquastar…” WLCS 98.3 FM is proud to bring you the Saturday Jukebox Cruise. Join Gilligan and the Skipper on this 3 hour tour set to the sounds of the 60’s and 70’s. Dress as your favorite Gilligan’s Island character or in your classic 60’s or 70’s cruise attire. Or, come as you are and enjoy the music and fun!  Win prizes and enjoy time on the water with your friends. Log onto www.aquastarcruises.com to grab your tickets while they last.

Live Music: James Margolis
September 21 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Saturday, September 21 from 7:00pm – 9:00pm, come to the Book Nook & Java Shop for live music from James Margolis!  James is a Brooklyn based musician with roots in the Philadelphia area.  In addition to being a musician, James is a sound engineer, having worked the soundboard at several NYC venues.  He engineered and produced his newest album “Live Fast Die Young” released in 2018 on bandcamp.  For more information call 231-894-5333.

Fruitport Board of Education Meeting Agenda – 09/16/19

Fruitport Community Schools
BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING
Fruitport High School Media Center
Monday, September 16, 2019 – 7:00 p.m.

I. CALL to ORDER

II. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE

III. ROLL CALL

IV. APPROVAL OF AGENDA

V. PRESENTATIONS
Welcome – Lauren Chesney
Fruitport Planning Commission – Jay Bolt

VI. COMMUNICATIONS

VII. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC*

VIII. SUPERINTENDENT/ADMINISTRATIVE REPORTS

IX. CONSENT AGENDA
1. Approval of Special Board Meeting Minutes of August 26, 2019 (attachment IX-1)
2. Approval of Bills (attachment IX-2)
General Fund                            $218,216.18
Other Funds:
Early Childhood Center                  1,101.31
Food Service                                        960.00
Coop Ed (ISD) Tech Millage        176,239.55
Capital Projects                            241,099.51
Total Bill List                            $637,616.55

3. Acceptance of Monthly Financial Report and ACH Transactions (attachment IX-3)
4. Acceptance of Student Activity Summary Report (attachment IX-4)
5. Acceptance of Credit Card and Utilities Report (attachment IX-5)
6. Approval of Capital Projects Progress Report (attachment IX-6)
7. Approval of Personnel Report (includes confirmation of new hires, resignations, retirees, and transfers) (attachment IX-7)

X. GENERAL BOARD BUSINESS

XI. BUSINESS & FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Elroy Buckner, Chairperson
1. Report of Committee Meeting held September 9, 2019 (attachment XI-1)
2. Authority to Borrow Funds (attachment XI-2)

XII. PERSONNEL COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Steve Kelly, Chairperson
1. Report of Committee Meeting held September 9, 2019 (attachment XII-1)
2. Principal/Assistant Principal Merit Pay (attachment XII-2)

XIII. STUDENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE REPORTS & RECOMMENDATIONS
Jill Brott, Chairperson

XIV. BOARD MEMBER REPORTS AND DISCUSSIONS

XV. AGENDA ITEMS FOR FUTURE MEETINGS & SCHEDULING OF SPECIAL MEETINGS
1. Board Workshop, September 25, 2019 @ 6:00 p.m.
2. Business & Finance Committee will meet Monday, October 14th @ 11:30 a.m.
3. Personnel Committee will meet Monday, October 14th @ 5:00 p.m.
4. Student Affairs Committee will meet Wednesday, October 16th @ 12:00 p.m.

XVI. REMARKS FROM THE PUBLIC*

XVII. ADJOURNMENT

~

*Time is provided for members of the audience to address the Board of Education regarding any topic including items on the agenda. The board is providing two opportunities for the public to comment during the meeting. The first is for people who wish to bring issues to the Board of Education for board consideration. At the end of the meeting the board will provide a brief opportunity for community members to comment on activities and/or discussion that took place during the board meeting. Time limits may be placed if a large number of individuals would like to address the board.

Decision America Tour Returning to North Carolina this Fall

franklingFranklin Graham’s ongoing Decision America Tour will roll across his home state of North Carolina this fall.

From October 1–13, the Decision America Tar Heel State Tour will make eight stops: Fayetteville, Greenville, Wilmington, Raleigh, Greensboro, Hickory, Charlotte and Asheville.

“The work of BGEA has deep roots in North Carolina, and I am excited to have the opportunity to preach the Gospel in cities across the Tar Heel state,” Graham said.

The Decision America Tour has been traveling across the United States since the beginning of 2016, when Graham visited all 50 state capitals to lead Americans in prayer and call the nation back to God.

Since then, he has continued to travel to various regions of the country—most recently the Northeast—to tell people the Good News of Jesus Christ.

See all of the Decision America Tour North Carolina stops and dates at http://decisionamerica.com.bgealogo

Ask Dr. Universe – Mummies

Dr. Universe: How do you make mummies? -Michael, 7, Arizona

Dear Michael,

When we think of mummies, we might imagine the kind from ancient Egypt wrapped up in linen. But there are lots of ways to make mummies—and they can even form in nature.

That’s what I found out from my friend Shannon Tushingham, an archaeologist at Washington State University and director of the WSU Museum of Anthropology.

In ancient Egypt, priests were usually in charge of making a mummy. They used a special hook to pull out the brain. They put the brain in a jar to help preserve it. They put the lungs, liver, intestines, and stomach in jars, too. But the heart was left in place.

The ancient Egyptians believed it was the heart, not the brain, that was the center of someone’s being and intelligence.

They also used a lot of salt to preserve the body, more linens to help the body keep its shape, and several yards of linen strips to wrap the body from head to toe.

“They had this down to a science,” Tushingham said, who was inspired as a kid when she got to see King Tut’s mummy.

The whole process of making a mummy would take about 70 days. But the making of a mummy was about more than just preserving a body. The ancient Egyptians also believed they were preparing someone for an after-life.

Along with the jars of organs, people would place items with the mummy like furniture, food, games, and other things their loved one might enjoy. The mummy might also get a decorative mask or be put in a stone case called a sarcophagus.

We have learned a lot about the process from hieroglyphics, the symbols that Egyptians used to write. The stories they wrote also tell us about mummified baboons, beetles, falcons, crocodiles, and lots and lots of cats, who they worshiped. Just saying.

Tushingham said we can also find mummies out in nature. One mummy that archaeologists get excited about is Ötzi, otherwise known as the Iceman.

He died in the mountains about 5,000 years ago and his body has been well-preserved. They even found a little bit of brain tissue. You can see his tattoos and archeologists even studied his hair, which had clues about what he liked to eat.

Researchers have also found mummies in bogs, or wetlands that have a lot of moss. These bogs can be found everywhere from Denmark to Florida and sometimes conditions can be just right to mummify a body. These mummies have been called “bog bodies.”

While we’ve found mummies in Egyptian tombs, we’ve also found them underground. The hot, dry conditions and chemistry of the dirt can help preserve bodies, too. Tushingham added that archeologists take great care when working with mummies or any kind of remains. The bodies are sacred, she said, and we are still finding them today.

Perhaps one day you’ll become an archeologist and find mummy or study hieroglyphics to help us learn even more about life in the past.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Submit a question!

Central Michigan University Spring 2019 Honors List

Students on Central Michigan University’s Spring 2019 honors list include:

Fruitport:
Devon Scott Eldred, Senior
Breanna Lacey Fialek, Senior
Nicholas James Klimek, Sophomore
Tyler Moss, Sophomore

Muskegon (49444):
Anna Christensen, Junior
Erin Olivia Ladd, Senior

Nunica:
Kayce Rae Goll, Senior
Marisa Lyn Stroebe, Junior

Ravenna:
Hannah Kay Anderson, Junior
Trevor John Baushke, Junior
Jesse Edwin Eckhardt, Senior
Madison Kathleen Eskola, Junior
Madison Anne Lewis, Senior
Kendall Alexis Parker, Sophomore
Jaimie Lynn Spoelman, Senior
Alyssa Crystal Theile, Junior

Spring Lake:
Amanda Mary Absher, Junior
Hannah Carey, Senior
Danielle Marie Foulkes, Freshman
Emma Catherine Leech, Senior
Joseph Molenkamp, Sophomore
Samuel Pranger, Sophomore
Shianna Joy Woodwyk, Junior

2019 Old Fashioned Days Horseshoe Event

first

1st Place
Jayden Fri and Stan Jacobs with a record of 8 wins and 0 losses in tournament play.

second

2nd Place
Bill Ingalls and John Deering with a record of 7 wins and 1 loss in tournament play.

third

3rd Place
Larry Thompson and Sean Brisson with a record of also 7 wins and 1 loss in tournament play.

Honorable Mention:
Bob Yonkers and Chris Nyenhuis, with a record of also 7 wins and 1 loss in tournament play, were eliminated in a hard fought battle for 3rd place.

Dismemberment Ban Petition Approved

Lansing, MI — On June 19, 2019, the Michigan Board of State Canvassers approved the summary and form of the Michigan Values Life petition to ban dismemberment abortions (D&E) in Michigan.

Right to Life of Michigan President Barbara Listing said, “Our affiliates and volunteers around the state are excited we’re able to begin collecting signatures to end this barbaric procedure in Michigan.”

Michigan Values Life is the name of the committee Right to Life of Michigan organized to collect signatures to initiate the legislation into the Michigan Legislature. The legislation can be passed into law by majority votes in the Legislature with no input from Governor Gretchen Whitmer, who has promised to veto the legislation.

The dismemberment ban itself is the same as the bills passed by the Michigan House and Senate in May. A section has been added allowing the Michigan Legislature to intervene in lawsuits in case Attorney General Dana Nessel refuses to defend the law in court.

It will take a few weeks for the petitions to be printed and distributed to volunteers who have already expressed interest. State law requires signatures to be collected within 180 days. A petition order form, circulating instructions, and other materials are available on the Michigan Values Life website: michiganvalueslife.org.

Retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy used the term “dismemberment” to describe dilation and evacuation abortions (D&E).

In his opinion in Stenberg v. Carhart, Justice Kennedy wrote, “The fetus, in many cases, dies just as a human adult or child would: It bleeds to death as it is torn limb from limb. The fetus can be alive at the beginning of the dismemberment process and can survive for a time while its limbs are being torn off.”

The dismemberment abortion procedure is the most frequently used late-term abortion procedure. In 2018, there were 1,908 dismemberment abortions in Michigan reported to the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services.

The dismemberment ban bills include an exception if the mother’s life is in danger. However, in published research on reasons women have abortions, the pro-abortion Alan Guttmacher Institute has stated that most late-term abortions are done for elective reasons.

Ottawa Sands Acquisition Update & Celebration Announcement

On July 25, Ottawa County Parks completed the acquisition of the Ottawa Sands property in Ferrysburg, MI

This summer, Ottawa County Parks received a $3.82 million grant from the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund Board to complete the acquisition of the Ottawa Sands. This grant, along with $200,000 of privately-raised funds by the Land Conservancy of West Michigan, funded the second phase of property acquisition.

The first phase of acquisition was made possible by a $4.2 million grant from the Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund (MNRTF) in 2018 and allowed Ottawa County Parks to purchase 188 acres of the property. The Land Conservancy purchased the remaining 157 acres in the summer of 2018 by securing a loan from The Conservation Fund, a national organization specializing in low-interest loans for conservation projects. In the year before the second phase of acquisition the Land Conservancy of West Michigan leased its 157 acres to Ottawa County Parks for management, so the park could open to the public.

“Ottawa Sands was an incredible opportunity, and all parties had to act quickly to secure its protection,” said Land Conservancy Executive Director Joe Engel. “We saw the immense value in working with Ottawa County Parks to protect this remarkable piece of property and are very grateful that the community stepped up to make this happen.”

“Being able to close on this property in my first month with Ottawa County Parks was incredibly exciting. Ottawa Sands is clearly special to our community and to the Trust Fund,” said Jason Shamblin, Ottawa County Parks Director. “To receive $8 million in grant funding and over $200,000 in private donations speaks for itself.”

“The Trust Fund grants were critical to the success of this project, and the outstanding support from the community was integral in securing them,” Engel said. “West Michigan stepped up for Ottawa Sands, and we have this stunning new park to show for it.”

Thanks to strong support from the community, The Land Conservancy of West Michigan exceeded its initial fundraising goal, raising nearly $400,000 to secure Ottawa Sands. Half of the funds were used to offset the MNRTF grant and the other half covered expenses related to the loan.

Additional support for this project came from Ottawa Sand Company; Loutit Foundation; Ottawa County Parks Foundation; J.A. Woollam Foundation; the North Bank Communities Fund, Greatest Needs Fund, Environment Fund and the William T. and Shirley A. Baker Fund of the Grand Haven Area Community Foundation; and many generous donors.

Ottawa County Parks and the Land Conservancy of West Michigan is celebrating this monumental acquisition with a special event on Tuesday, October 15 from 4:30-6:30 pm.

The evening will include naturalist-led hikes and property tours beginning at 4:30 pm and 6 pm. A short ceremony will begin at 5:30 pm. Light refreshments will be provided. This is an outdoor event, be sure to dress for the weather.

Fruitport Charter Township Board of Trustees Meeting Minutes of August 26, 2019

A work session of the Fruitport Charter Township Board began at 6:30pm on Monday, August 26, 2019, in the township board room.

Members Present: Heidi Tice, Supervisor; Andrea Anderson, Clerk; Rose Dillon, Treasurer; Trustees Jeff Jacobs, Terry Knoll, Denise Winebarger
Members Absent: Greg Hulka, excused

At 7:07pm, Heidi Tice opened the regular meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance followed by a prayer.

Also Present: 1- residents; 0- employees; 0- guests; Director of Public Utilities, Steve Biesiada; Attorney Ron Bultje.

The motion by Terry Knoll, supported by Denise Winebarger, was carried unanimously, to approve the minutes of July 22, 2019 as presented.

The motion by Andrea Anderson, supported by Rose Dillon, was carried unanimously, to approve the agenda as presented, with the following addition:

Item 8-F: Approval for Lion’s Club street corner sales

CORRESPONDENCE / REPORTS
1. Steve Biesiada reported that a pump went down at the Mt. Garfield lift station and is being rebuilt; the leak at the Smiley water tower will be repaired soon, waiting for part.
2. Rose Dillon shared that the Public Safety Director will have a user agreement soon from Merle Boes for the on-site fuel station.
3. Heidi Tice shared that the Community Day slip ‘n slide went well; the new Tree House Child Care Center is now open for business in the Village.
4. Andrea Anderson shared the turnout of the August 6th election; the Township will be reimbursed $6,620.05 by the Veterans Administration for the cost associated with the August 6th election; there will not be a November election in Fruitport.

PUBLIC COMMENTS REGARDING AGENDA ITEMS: none

UNFINISHED BUSINESS:

19-097 Best Yard Contest
The addresses submitted for this year’s Best Yard Contest were:
2129 E. Swanson Ct.
5360 Brooks Rd.
6865 Walker Rd.
85 N. 8th Ave.

5360 Brooks Rd. was chosen as the winner.

19-098 Police Special Assessment District discussion
Discussion occurred. The roll was reviewed. The concept of a cost recovery ordinance was also discussed.

NEW BUSINESS:

19-099 Approval for Farr Rd. culvert replacement
Per the Muskegon County Road Commission, a culvert failure has been identified on Farr Rd between Johnson Rd and Brooks road. The preliminary cost for the replacement is $9,850.51; of which $2,425.26 is the Township’s responsibility.

Jeff Jacobs moved, Terry Knoll seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to approve the replacement of the culvert on Farr Rd.
Ayes: Knoll, Jacobs, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger
Nays: None

19-100 Budget amendments
Terry Knoll moved, Rose Dillon seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to approve budget amendments as presented.
Ayes: Knoll, Jacobs, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger
Nays: None

19-101 Permission to fill Deputy Assessor vacancy and job description approval
Discussion on who will sit on the interview panel and review of the job description.

The motion by Andrea Anderson, seconded by Terry Knoll, was carried unanimously, to grant permission to fill the Deputy Assessor vacancy and approve the job description provided.

19-102 Cell tower lease agreement amendment
The rent received from the tower company is currently $800/month. American Tower has requested to decrease the monthly rent to $450 and add renewal terms (however, the tower company can terminate at any time).

The sentiment of the Board is to leave the lease agreement alone; they are satisfied as is and do not wish to make any changes.

19-103 Road maintenance agreement
Terry Knoll moved, Denise Winebarger seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to execute the agreement once it is updated with the addition of Spruce St.
Ayes: Knoll, Jacobs, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger
Nays: none

19-104 Approval for Lion’s Club street corner sales
The Lion’s Club has requested permission to have their street corner fundraiser on September 13 &14 at the corners of Dangl/Sternberg and Shettler/Sheridan.

The motion by Rose Dillon, seconded by Denise Winebarger, was carried unanimously, to allow the Lion’s Club to sell fundraising items at the designated intersections.

19-104 Payment of bills
Heidi Tice moved, Terry Knoll seconded, MOTION CARRIED, to approve bills as presented for payment in the following amounts: General Fund $47,247.77; Public Safety $37,668.39; Water $148,547.38; Sewer $13,258.57; T&A $4,784.00; Street lights $15,080.78
Totaling: $266,586.89
Ayes: Knoll, Jacobs, Anderson, Tice, Dillon, Winebarger
Nays: none

ADDITIONAL REPORTS:
1. Andrea Anderson shared liquor license correspondences for 6523 Airline Rd. and 5648 Harvey St.
2. Ron Bultje shared copies of sample fireworks ordinances.

PUBLIC COMMENTS PART II: none

The motion by Terry Knoll, supported by Denise Winebarger, was carried unanimously, to adjourn the meeting at 8:32pm.

ANDREA ANDERSON, CLERK
HEIDI TICE, SUPERVISOR

Muskegon County Calendar of Events 09/09/19 – 09/16/19

Presented by the Muskegon County Convention & Visitors Bureau
www.visitmuskegon.org

Ongoing Events:

Planetarium Show: Supervolcanoes
“Supervolcanoes” is a free, 30-minute planetarium show that looks at a rare class of large volcanic eruptions on Earth and other planets. See it Tuesday and Thursday evenings at 7:00pm through October 31 at Muskegon Community College, room 1072.  No reservations are needed; this is walk-in only.  Be sure to come early and check out the new “World of Water” exhibit before the show, at the John Barley Science Museum in room 1073, across the hall from the planetarium.  The museum is open until 7:00pm on Tuesdays and Thursdays; allow 20-30 minutes.  For more information, or to schedule a private show for groups of 15 or more, call 231-777-0289.

Muskegon South Pierhead Light Tours
Tour the Muskegon South Pierhead Light Saturdays in September and October from 2:00pm – 5:00pm, Memorial Day through Labor Day! For more information call 1-844-MLIGHTS.
Docent-led Tower Tours Admission:
• $2 – Kids 11 and under
• $3 – Military and veterans
• $4 – 12 and up
Please note: Children must be at least 3 feet tall in order to climb. Sturdy shoes are recommended.  Contact muskegonlights@gmail.com to book a private tour of the Lighthouse with one of their knowledgeable history docents. The cost is $50 a person for up to ten people for sunset or any time of day you desire.

Pigeon Hill Brewing Co: Monday Night Bike Ride
Monday evenings, beginning at 6:00pm, come to Pigeon Hill Brewing Co. to join in a group bicycle ride!  The goal is for everyone to start and finish together for a total ride time of 90 minutes. Please arrive early.  The ride begins promptly at 6:00pm.  You’ll travel from Pigeon Hill to Pere Marquette Beach via the Lakeshore Bike Trail (10-11 miles).  For more information call (231) 375-5184.

Team Trivia Game Show
Mondays at 6:30pm, come to Racquet’s Downtown Grill for the Team Trivia Game Show!  Groups of any size are invited to play for free with prizes for the top three teams!  Categories range from pop culture and entertainment, to sports, history, science, culture and general knowledge.  Your live host will also offer many genres of music throughout the game, plus, you’ll enjoy food and drink specials each week.  For more information, call (231) 726-4007.

Roll On Muskegon
Roll On Muskegon is a casual, family friendly, community bike ride on the streets of Muskegon. Every Monday night we leave as a group from the downtown Muskegon Farmer’s Market to visit and explore a different neighborhood of Muskegon.
• When: Every Monday night. Wheels turn at 6:30pm
• Where: Meet at the Muskegon Farmer’s Market
• Speed: Casual, 8-10 mph
• How Long: Approx. 90 minutes

Muskegon Farmers’ Market & Flea Market
The Muskegon Farmers’ Market, owned and operated by the City of Muskegon, is dedicated to showcasing the best in locally-grown foods, flowers, nursery stock, handicrafts and baked goods. The Market also hosts The Flea where everything imaginable is sold.
Farmers’ Market summer hours are Tuesdays, Thursdays & Saturdays from 8:00am – 2:00pm. The Flea Market is Wednesdays from 8:00am – 2:00pm.  For more information call 231-722-3251 or visit www.muskegonfarmersmarket.com.

Montague Farmers’ Market
The Montague Farmers’ Market opens the first Saturday in June and runs every Saturday through October. The Market is also open on Wednesdays in July, August, and September.  Market hours are from 9:00am – 1:00pm.  Any farmer or baker who is interested in selling goods at the Market should contact Farmers’ Market Manager, Jeff Auch at City Hall at 231-893-1155 ext. 1757 to check if any booths are available.

Sweetwater Local Foods Market
Sweetwater Local Foods Market offers healthy, humane, homegrown, local food you can trust! They are open year-round, Saturdays from 9:00am – 12:00pm.  Summer markets are held in the parking lot; winter markets are inside the lobby.  For more information, visit www.sweetwaterlocalfoodsmarket.org.

Fetch Cycling Group
Meet in the parking lot behind Fetch Brewing Company on Thursdays at 6:00pm for a 60 minute No Drop Bike Ride. All abilities and fitness levels are encouraged and welcome.  Helmets are strongly encouraged.  Fetch Brewing Company provides you with the added incentive of $1 off your first post-ride beer!

Sweet Saturdays at the Lakeside Emporium
Join the Lakeside Emporium on Saturday afternoons from 12:00pm – 4:00pm to enjoy food, entertainment, and “Treasure Alley” – a collection of vendors ranging from artists and authors to crafters, collectors, and even pottery demonstrations, all conveniently located on-site at the Lakeside Emporium.  It’s family fun and enjoyment for all ages, and an opportunity to find just the perfect treat or gift for yourself or someone else. Enjoy the experience, delicious products, and great customer service at the Lakeside Emporium, and check out all the other wonderful businesses in Lakeside.  For more information call 231-755-9933.

USS Silversides Submarine Museum Fall Lecture & Film Series
Lectures will be presented every Monday beginning September 9 at 6:00pm. The cost is $5.00 per person per lecture or FREE with your USS Silversides Submarine Museum membership.  In addition to the lectures, for one week prior to each lecture, they will be showing a film on a related subject. Movies will be shown daily at 1:00pm.  The cost to attend the movie is included with your $6 admission ticket to the museum.  Admission to the museum is also FREE with your USS Silversides Submarine Museum membership.  For more information call (231) 755-1230.

Special Events:

Irish Dance Class
September 9 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
Get ready for the Michigan Irish Music Festival (September 12 – 15) with a free beginners Irish dance class!  Monday, September 9 from 4:30pm – 5:30pm join Ardan Dance Academy at Tatra Hall to get your step-dance on!  They are now enrolling for fall classes and all ages are welcome.  For more information visit www.ardanacademy.com.

Muskegon LETR Color Run 2019
September 10 @ 5:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Tuesday, September 10 from 6:30pm – 8:00pm, join the Muskegon area Law Enforcement Torch Run to raise money for Special Olympics Michigan athletes at a timed 5k Fun Run/Walk!  Day-of registration begins at 5:00pm at Fricano’s rear parking lot area.  The Muskegon LETR Color Run is one in a series of 42 community runs scheduled in September around the state during Law Enforcement Torch Run Week!

The cost to participate in the Color Run is $25 per person or $5 for youth 18 years old and under, which includes a commemorative race shirt, goodie bag, and refreshments.  Any youth who does not want a commemorative race shirt runs for free, but still must register to make sure there are plenty of goodie bags and refreshments for all.

For questions, e-mail mkgfunrun@gmail.com or to sign up at www.give.classy.org/muskegon19.  If you have a community youth group and would like to participate as a group, e-mail mkgfunrun@gmail.com to make a group reservation.  Early packet pick up and late registration will take place on Tuesday, September 9 from 5:00pm – 7:00pm at Unruly Brewing Co. located at 360 W. Western Ave.

The Art and History of the Celts
September 11 @ 6:00 pm – September 13 @ 8:00 pm
September 11 – 13 and September 16 from 6:00pm – 8:00pm, come to the Sturrus Technology Center lobby at Muskegon Community College for the free lecture series, “The Art and History of the Celts!” Instructor Tim Norris with guest presenter Michael Johnson will explain where and when Celtic art and culture originated.
They will answer such questions as: Who are the Celts? What traits make their art significant?  How has Celtic art and culture changed over time?  How does their art reflect their unique spiritual beliefs and traditions?  What vestiges of Celtic culture have survived to this day?  What was Ireland’s distinctive role in preserving this heritage?
This course/presentation series also examines how art and history is interpreted and presented through contemporary festivals and popular culture.  For more information, contact tim.norris@muskegoncc.edu or call 231-777-0344.
Schedule:
• September 11: The Rise of the Celts and the Birth of Their Art
• September 12: What Makes Celtic Art “Celtic?”
• September 13: The Book of Kells and Celtic Mythology
• September 16: Celti-Pop- Celtic Traditions Meet Popular Culture

Michigan Irish Music Festival
September 12 – September 15
The Michigan Irish Music Festival returns to Heritage Landing September 12-15!  Back for the 20th year, this festival features continuous music on seven covered stages, featuring live music, great dining options, beverage offerings, and more.  You’ll also love the Celtic Kitchen and Bob and Bernie’s Pub for authentic Irish food and beverages including Irish Fest Stout Irish Cream and others. There’s also the Irish Marketplace children’s activities a cultural center a session tent and tea room.  The festival offers an Early-In Free promotion on Friday from 5:00 to 6:00pm.  3-Day passes are also available.  For more information visit www.michiganirish.org.

Hat Happy Hour at the Lakeshore Museum Center
September 12 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm
Have a cool hat with a hot story? Thursday, September 12 from 5:30pmn – 7:30pm, join the Lakeshore Museum Center for an opportunity to have your hat’s story told in their upcoming community-curated exhibit: Hats Off to Muskegon!
During their Hat Happy Hour, they will be taking photos and information about any hats with ties to Muskegon County. Their committee will then select hats to be loaned to the museum and appear in the exhibit.  At the event, Collections Curator Brenda Nemetz, will highlight a few of the museum’s most interesting hats during a short presentation at 6:00pm.  This free event will feature light appetizers and a cash bar. Don’t have a hat to share? That’s O.K., come have a drink and learn more about the stories behind hats.  For more information call 231-722-0278.

Opening Event: Undying Traditions – Memento Mori
September 12 @ 5:30 pm
The Muskegon Museum of Art presents “Undying Traditions: Memento Mori” this fall, bringing together work by artists from across the United States currently exploring themes of death and earthly pleasure. The exhibition includes paintings, photography, and sculpture and runs September 12, 2019 through January 5, 2020.

The exhibition opens with a public reception on Thursday, September 12 at 5:30pm with a lecture by Art Martin at 7:00pm. Event admission is free.

Featured Artists: Landis Blair, David Cahill, Robert Steven Connett, David Gluck, Kate MacDowell, Jeanette May, Chris Peters, Daniel Sprick, Katherine Stone, Paulette Tavormina, Maria Tomasula, and Will Wilson.

Program support is provided, in part, through a grant from the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs, an affiliate of the National Endowment for the arts. For more information call 231-720-2570.

Hackley Attic Escape Room
September 13 & 14 @ 5:00 pm & 7:00 pm
Experience the Hackley House as no one has before! For many years, the Hackley Attic has been a mysterious place for visitors, now, it’s up to you and your closest friends to escape a Victorian storage room filled with puzzles, locks and riddles!  Brush up on your Muskegon history and escape the attic in 80 minutes!  Space is limited to 10 people per session, so be sure to order your tickets through Eventbrite.com!  The cost is $15 for museum members or $20 for non-members.  For more information call 231-722-7578.

Contemporary Kid Super Saturday
September 14 @ 10:00 am – 3:00 pm
September 14 from 10:00am – 3:00pm, bring the family to the Muskegon Museum of Art for a “Contemporary Kid Super Saturday!” This free family fun day will get you touch with your inner artist.  Activities and admission are free!  For more information call 231-720-2570.
• 10:00am & 1:00pm – Family Film
• 11:00am – 1:00pm – Guided Look: Explore the 91st Michigan Contemporary Exhibition with a MMA Docent.
• 11:00am – 2:00pm – Make & Take: Create your own abstract color collage in the classroom!

The Be Event
September 14 @ 1:00 pm
September 14 at 1:00pm, you’re invited to the beautiful Frauenthal Theater for “The Be Event” featuring Keynote Speaker Dr. Jean Houston; PhD, scholar, philosopher and researcher in Human Capacities, as well as one of the foremost visionary thinkers and doers of our time. Tickets are $75.00 and available at the box office by calling 231-727-8001.

Shoreline Victorian Ladies Society 25th Anniversary: Victorian Dress and Customs
September 14 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Saturday, September 14 from 2:00pm – 4:00pm, come to Hackley Public Library as the Shoreline Victorian Ladies Society hosts Wendy Batchelder in celebration of the society’s 25th Anniversary!  Wendy, who hand makes her Victorian outfits, will give an interactive presentation on what it was like to dress and live as a Victorian woman.  Don’t miss this fashionably fun event!  Refreshments will be available during this FREE program which is recommended for all ages.  For more information call (231) 722-8000.

Exploding Paint
September 14 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Saturday, September 14 from 2:00pm – 3:00pm, come to Hackley Public Library as they partner with the Muskegon Museum of Art to create unique masterpieces during the Exploding Paint program!  Kids ages 2 – 17 will combine a seltzer tablet with water and paint and to create a bright work of art.  This program will take place outside on the lawn between the library and the art museum.  Smocks and supplies will be provided to participants during this free event!  For more information call (231) 722-8000.

SNW Fitness 10 Year Celebration
September 14 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Saturday, September 14 from 4:00pm – 5:00pm, Shoreline Natural Wellness & Fitness (SNW Fitness) will be celebrating 10 years in the business of changing lives!  Everyone is invited to come by for appetizers and a Champagne toast, as well as giveaways, special discounts and awards.  For more information call 231-750-2525.

Odd Side Ales Full Moon Cruise
September 14 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Saturday, September 14 from 7:00pm – 9:00pm, board the Aquastar for an Odd Side Ales Full Moon Cruise!  Come howl at the full moon as you cruise Muskegon Lake and Lake Michigan and take in the show only West Michigan can provide…a beautiful sunset AND a full moon.  This cruise features Odd Side Ales beverages, live music by the Intolerables and light appetizers.  Tickets are $35 per person and include your first beer.  Book your spot now at www.aquastarcruises.com.

Retro Expo
September 15 @ 11:00 am – 3:00 pm
Sunday, September 15 from 11:00am – 3:00pm, come to the Muskegon Farmers’ Market for the Retro Expo! This is an outdoor vintage market filled with vendors selling retro goods and up-cycled items.  For more information call (231) 670-3722.

Grand Valley State University Winter Dean’s List

Grand Valley State University announces the names of students who were placed on the dean’s list for the Winter 2019 semester concluding in April. The list includes those students who have maintained a 3.5 grade point average and been enrolled in a minimum of 12 credits. The honor is noted on the students’ official records.

Students honored for the winter semester include:

Fruitport: Tyler A. Adams; Matthew C. Davidson; Ian M. Heil; Kaylin R. Peyerk; Brittany L. Preston; Alyson J. Rosema; Lauren R. Sander; Gabrielle A. Schaub; Isaac Stephenson; Michael M. Walstra; Rachel M. Weiland

Muskegon (49444): Bradley C. Chorny; Brandy M. Cumbee; Lauryn H. Doctor; Megan L. Harken; Jessica E. Herring; Madelynn F. Kelly; Stephanie A. Langlois; Shane M. Lucas; Zachary R. Manguem; Brendan S. Peterman; Cade B. Snuffer; Alexis K. Syswerda; Logan R. Vanderlaan

Nunica: Heather A. Carlson; Annemieke K. Engelsma; Morgynn M. Reedy; Taylor J. Stanton; Jenna M. Visniski

Ravenna: Marissa Aney; Lillian R. Lieffers

Spring Lake: Cameron J. Amaya; Carley E. Bench; Alexander C. Brower; Macayla M. Carrns; Matthew D. Cassar; Thomas M. Clover; Sarah C. Corgan; Aylissa M. Curry; Bradley D. Debien; Hannah M. Dursema; Michael T. Farwig; Eli L. Flores; Madeline J. Foster; Konnor A. French; Jillian F. Garzelloni; Olivia K. Grimmer; Drew A. Henman; Sabrina I. Hochhuth; Jillian C. Huizenga; Olivia R. Jones; Hannah R. Junglas; Jacob D. Kugler; Jeremiah B. Masvero; Jaime L. McCool; Rylan L. Peets; Christian L. Pelke; Benjamin A. Reck; Matthew A. Schmidt; Jillian J. Schnurstein; Veronica M. Schoemer; Dylan D. Styburski; Madison R. Terpstra; Breanna N. Tullis; Kyle R. VanDenHeuvel; Abby K. VanOtteren; Samuel N. Ventocilla; Hannah J. Walling; Jacob T. Weesies; Leah J. Wilcox

Grand Valley State University Winter Graduate List

More than 3,200 Grand Valley State University students participated in commencement ceremonies this past April at Van Andel Arena in Grand Rapids. A list of the names of Grand Valley’s most recent graduates follows.

Students who graduated at the conclusion of the Winter 2019 semester in April include:

Fruitport: Kaylin R. Peyerk, BBA; Allison L. Van Kampen, MSW

Muskegon (49444): Montoya J. Briggs, BSW; Joleen K. Cejmer, BS; Brandy M. Cumbee, BS; Jessica E. Herring, BS; Chelsey J. Kriger, MSW; Allie M. LaLone, BS; Stephanie A. Langlois, BS; Emily J. Leindecker, BBA; Logan R. Vanderlaan, BME

Nunica: Heather A. Carlson, BA; Nickolas M. Carrier, BS; Taylor J. Stanton, BSW; Jenna M. Visniski, BA

Ravenna: Alicia R. Cole, BA; Lillian R. Lieffers, BS; Kelly M. Merrill, MED; Lisa A. VanderWal, BBA; Leann K. Williams, BS

Spring Lake: Alexander C. Brower, BBA; Benton W. Conrad, BS; Aylissa M. Curry, BS; Shelby L. Kiser, MSW; Andrew R. McDonough, MED; Anne K. Revilla, BBA; Tiffany M. Sias, MSW; Katelyn E. Sinn, MSW; Saxton Q. Stafford, BS; Sarah E. Tibbe, MED; Erin R. Vargo, BS; Hannah J. Walling, BA

Americans Blinded by the God of this World

The God of this World is Satan, the Great Deceiver.  He has blinded Americans into believing killing unborn humans is a Woman’s right, but God forbids killing innocent humans made after His image.

We have done a terrible job in America, by not following God and the Word of God.  He told us we are to warn those that are committing iniquities against His Moral Laws, so they can turn around and not go to Hell.

Those warned, who don’t change their way, will die in their sin and be lost forever.  Their blood will be on their hands.  But if we failed to warn them, their blood will also be on our hands.

So, let this be a warning to politicians, and others, who support abortion.  You are supporting perhaps the greatest iniquity one can commit, the mass murder of the most innocent of human beings.

No matter what good things you done during your life time, when you come before Jesus, He will say, “I never knew you:  depart from me, ye that work iniquity,”  He will also say,  into the “everlasting fire, prepared for the devil and his angels.”

Our Declaration of Independence asserted certain unalienable rights, which includes, “Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness,” not the taking of life.

By the way, approximately half of those unborn murdered, were female, and most would have been loving mothers, like our mothers were.

Stop blinding others and accept the fact that abortion, is downright, the murder of innocent human beings, which God says He forms in the womb of the mother.

God’s will is that you believe, repent, and be saved.  Unbelief spells doom.

Ask Dr. Universe – Whales’ IQ

Hi Dr. Universe: Are whales smart? -Tishawnie P., 9, Massachusetts

Dear Tishawnie,

Whales can learn to do all kinds of amazing things. Humpback whales learn how to blow bubbles and work together to hunt for fish. Dolphins, a kind of toothed whale, teach their babies different sounds. It’s a kind of language the young dolphin will know for life.

But to find out just how smart whales really are, I asked my friend Enrico Pirotta, a Washington State University researcher who studies how blue whales make long journeys across the ocean.

Before he revealed the answer to your question, he shared a bit more about intelligence. Usually people talk about intelligence as the ability to learn something and apply what they learn, he said. It can be tricky to compare our intelligence with other animals, but it’s something some scientists think about.

“There is not an IQ test we can do with whales,” Pirotta said.

Whales have instincts. They follow their moms, go to the surface to breathe, but they can also learn. They have a pretty high level of intelligence when compared to a lot of other animals, he adds.

Pirotta told me that if we were in Australia, we might even see some dolphins who learn to carry sea sponges on their beak. They do this to protect their beaks from getting poked by critters or sharp pieces of coral while they search around for food in the sand.

It’s also important to note that what we know about whale intelligence comes mostly from studying those in captivity, especially dolphins. We still don’t know as much about wild whales, but Enrico said that the studies we do have are showing that the wild whales are likely just as intelligent.

Whales have pretty big brains. In fact, the largest brain on the planet belongs to the sperm whale. The sperm whale brain weighs about five times as much as a human brain. But just because you have a big brain doesn’t necessarily make you smarter.

However, we do know that animals that have a big brain compared to their body do tend to have a certain kind of intelligence. One particular thing scientists look at when studying intelligence has to do with special cells that help animals process information. They are called spindle neurons and they’ve been found in humans, elephants, and apes, too. Scientists have found connections between these parts and an animal’s ability to learn and apply knowledge.

Pirotta also said that some animals like whales also appear to have something called emotional intelligence. They can show signs of empathy, grief, joy, and playfulness. All of these learned behaviors, types of intelligence, and signs of teamwork have led scientists to think about groups of whales in new ways, too.

“We now believe this qualifies as a form of culture,” Pirotta said.

Who knows? Maybe one day you will use your own human intelligence to study whales and help us learn more about whale culture and what’s going on inside their brains.

Sincerely,
Dr. Universe

Submit a question!

Village of Fruitport Special Council Meeting Minutes – 08/26/19

VILLAGE OF FRUITPORT
SPECIAL COUNCIL MEETING
AUGUST 26TH 7PM

1. Call to Order
President Roger Vanderstelt called the meeting to order at 7:00pm

2. Pledge

3. Prayer

4. Roll call
Present: Roger Vanderstelt, Carl Rothenberger, Amy Haack, Bill Overkamp, Jeff Guiles and Jay Bolt.
Absent: Donna Pope

5. Approval of August 26th Council Meeting Agenda
Motion made by Bill to approve the meeting agenda, supported by Jeff. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

6. Public Comment
None

7. Sink hole on Beech between 7th & 8th
Roger reviewed the issue with the sink hole and the need for repair. He provided 3 quotes for the work. A discussion took place regarding the quotes. A motion was made by Carl Rothenberger to accept the bid of $14,800.00 from McCormick Sand, Inc. for Storm Sewer Crossing Repair on Beech Street between 7th & 8th Avenue with a payment from the Local Streets Fund, with the addition of payment upon completion and inspection of work, any changes to the quote must be received in writing and approved prior to work being down and that it is completed by September 6th, 2019, supported by Jeff Guiles.
Roll call AYES: Haack, Rothenberger, Overkamp, Bolt, Guiles and Vanderstelt
NAYS: None
Absent: Pope

8. Removal of Buoys
Roger advised that Bill Stone offered to remove the buoys for us at a cost of $100.00. Discussion took place and it was decided to stay with the current company for the removal of buoys.

9. Donated Park Property
Council had approved brush hogging the new park property in the spring and it has not been done. A discussion took place and Roger agreed to call Paul Schultz to have the work completed.

10. Public Comment
None

11. Adjournment
Motion made by Carl to adjourn at 7:58pm, supported by Jeff. With a unanimous vote, the motion carried.

Respectfully submitted by,

Ann LaCroix
Clerk

Fruitport Township Board of Trustees Meeting Agenda – 09/09/19

AGENDA
FRUITPORT CHARTER TOWNSHIP BOARD OF TRUSTEES
FRUITPORT TOWNSHIP HALL
5865 AIRLINE ROAD, FRUITPORT, MI 49415

SEPTEMBER 9, 2019

6:30 P.M. WORK SESSION
7:00 P.M. BOARD MEETING

01. Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States
02. Roll call
03. Approval of board minutes: 8/26/19
04. Approve / amend agenda
05. Correspondence / reports
06. Public comments regarding agenda items

07. Unfinished Business
A. Police Special Assessment District

08. New Business
A. Resolution in honor of Lueneda Johnson’s 100th Birthday
B. First Reading: 2018 Edition of the International Fire Code Ordinance
C. First Reading: Zoning Text Amendment Ordinance to prohibit recreational marihuana establishments
D. Approval to fill part-time Police Department clerical vacancy

09. Approval of Bills
10. Reports
11. Public Comments
12. Adjournment

The Township will provide necessary reasonable aids and services for this meeting to individuals with disabilities by writing or telephoning the following Township Clerk: Andrea Anderson, Fruitport Township Hall, 5865 Airline Road, Fruitport, MI 49415   (231) 865-3151

Beware of False Social Security and Medicare Advertisements

by Vonda Vantil, Social Security Public Affairs Specialist

Scammers have become more aggressive and sophisticated in the digital age. With millions of people relying on Social Security and Medicare, scammers target audiences who are looking for legitimate program and benefit information. Scammers sometimes try to scare people into giving out their personal information. Never give someone who called you any personal information unless you absolutely know who they are.

The law that addresses misleading Social Security and Medicare advertising prohibits people or non-government businesses from using words or emblems that mislead others. Their advertising can’t claim that they represent, are somehow affiliated with, or are endorsed or approved by Social Security or the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (Medicare).

People are often misled by advertisers who use the terms “Social Security” or “Medicare.” Often, these companies offer Social Security services for a fee, even though Social Security offers the same services free of charge. These services include getting:
A corrected Social Security card showing a person’s married name;
A Social Security card to replace a lost card;
A Social Security Statement; and
A Social Security number for a child.

If you receive misleading information about Social Security, send the complete ad, including the envelope (if applicable), to:

Office of the Inspector General Fraud Hotline
Social Security Administration
P.O. Box 17768
Baltimore, MD 21235

You can learn more about how we combat fraudulent advertisers by reading our publication What You Need to Know About Misleading Advertising at www.socialsecurity.gov/pubs/EN-05-10005.pdf.

Successful Local Businessman Speaks to Calvary Christian High School Assembly

tedfricano

Picture credit: Brad Richards

Local businessman Ted Fricano, owner of Fricano Place and Fricano’s pizza in Muskegon as well as the brand new “Ted’s”  restaurant in Spring Lake, was a highly anticipated guest speaker at Calvary Christian Schools in Fruitport.  Ted gave an impassioned speech about Civics, Entrepreneurship, and strategies for being successful after high school.  His main themes for success included “Hard Work, Dedication, and Prayer” as well as “Actions, Attitude, and Atmosphere”.  He gave important tips on how to apply for a job and good habits for the students to have in life, including starting everything with prayer.  These themes were given with real world motivational and inspirational examples, and the students of Calvary were active listeners and very enthusiastic about Fricano’s message.  Calvary Senior Emily Wesner said “I truly feel inspired, motivated, and enlightened by Mr. Fricano”, while senior Kristina Warren said “Mr. Fricano is a great example of perseverance and dedication”, and senior Nick Cadena said “It’s my dream to open my own restaurant someday”.  Calvary Christian Schools would like to extend a big thank you to Ted Fricano for his willingness to take the time and effort to share with our students!

 

Construction Continues on Idema Explorers Trail

Ottawa County Parks Foundation, Georgetown Township help fund new section of Idema Explorers Trail

Quick facts:
• Project is the result of government/non-profit partnership
• More work needs to be done to complete entire Grand River Greenway & Idema Explorers Trail
• This segment sets stage for future connections

Dozers, graders, and rollers are clearing the way for the next segment of the Idema Explorers Trail in Georgetown Township. Crews are constructing 1.17 miles of 10’-wide pathway along Cottonwood Drive and 10th Avenue near the Jenison business district.

This segment of trail was funded through the Ottawa County Parks Foundation’s Grand River Greenway Campaign in partnership Ottawa County Parks and Georgetown Township. The funding from these organizations leveraged a grant from the Michigan Department of Transportation’s (MDOT) Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP).

The Cottonwood Drive segment is part of a multi-year effort to complete the core Grand River Greenway in Ottawa County. The effort includes purchasing up to 700-acres of additional land along the Grand River and constructing 27-miles of new trail (the Idema Explorers Trail) to connect the Greenway lands together over the next five years.

roadconstructionThe Idema Explorers Trail is being constructed in phases along the south side of the Grand River. Once completed, the non-motorized multi-use pathway will be 35 miles in length and will connect together eight county and state parks in Ottawa County. It also connects Millennium Park to Grand Haven for the first time, the two Grand Valley State University campuses together, and hundreds of miles of regional trails including a direct route to downtown Grand Rapids.

The Parks Foundation funding was made possible through its Grand River Greenway Campaign which is co-chaired by Peter Secchia, Monica Verplank, and Samantha Verplank. To complete the entire project, more funding is needed and donor engagement is ongoing. Enough funding has been raised to leverage future potential grants and construct 2/3 of the trail route. Still, to help ensure that the $41 million, multi-decade Greenway project is completed, $1.2 million in philanthropic funding is still needed.

“We believe the Idema Explorers Trail will be a vital recreational and pedestrian/bicycle transportation route for people in Ottawa County as well as for visitors all over West Michigan and beyond,” said Secchia. “It is great to see the next step being taken, but we need to continue to work together to support the Greenway so that we can re-connect our communities back to the river.”

“There is seven miles of riverfront in Georgetown Township, but there is no bikeable/walkable access to the river for most of our residents,” said Georgetown Township Supervisor Jim Wierenga. “The work being done on Cottonwood Drive moves us closer to making that possible.”

The new segment of Idema Explorers Trail along Cottonwood Drive will be important transportation route for the more densely populated neighborhoods of the Jenison area. It also sets the stage for important future connections/amenities including:

• Future connections to protected park areas (the Bend Area and as yet an unnamed 40-acre space north of Baldwin Street)
• Future direct connection to Kent Trails near the Ottawa/Kent County border once trail is constructed to the east.
• Future connection to the Grand River waterfront which will the first walkable/bikeable route to public land along the Grand River in Georgetown Township.

The Ottawa County Road Commission is administering the TAP grant and also designed the project. Brenner Excavating out of Hopkins Michigan is handling construction.

For more info on the 2019 construction visit: https://news.miottawa.org/idema-explorers-trail/

Grand River Greenway Facts
• 14 county parks properties with over 2,700 acres of land
• Greenway also features a water trail (Grand River Heritage Water Trail) and a historic features tour for motorists (Historic River Road).
• Over 5,000 acres of land owned by other agencies between Grand Haven and Grand Rapids

To help complete the Greenway, the Parks Foundation launched the Grand River Greenway Campaign which is now only $1.2 million from completing its fund-raising goal. To learn more or donate, visit http://ottawacountyparksfoundation.org/ or call 616-215-6544.

Social Security Delivers the Most Popular Baby Names in Michigan for 2018

The Social Security Administration announced the most popular baby names in May for 2018. Noah and Olivia topped the list.

The top five boys and girls names for 2018 in Michigan were:

Boys:
1) Noah
2) Oliver
3) Liam
4) Benjamin
5) William

Girls:
1) Olivia
2) Ava
3) Emma
4) Charlotte
5) Amelia

Nancy A. Berryhill, Acting Commissioner of Social Security, announced last week that Liam and Emma were the most popular baby names in the U.S.  How does Michigan compare to the rest of the country?  Check out Social Security’s website — www.socialsecurity.gov— to see the top national baby names for 2018.

Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson Settles ‘Ballot Selfie’ Case

Agreement allows voters to photograph own ballot; other restrictions remain in place

May 8, 2019 – Subject to court approval, the secretary of state today settled a federal lawsuit challenging Michigan’s restrictions on ballot photography, sometimes known as “ballot selfies.”

Under the settlement, in which both parties to the suit agreed to dismiss the case, voters will be allowed to take a photograph of their own ballot but only while in the voting booth. The agreement doesn’t affect other prohibitions on photography in the area where voting is occurring or sharing ballot images within 100 feet from the polling place (the buffer zone where electioneering is prohibited).

Ottawa County Honors Employees for Customer Service

Join us in congratulating Judy Kettring, Community Health Worker, from the Department of Public Health and Frank Archer, Maintenance Worker, from the Facilities Maintainance Department, who have been recognized as Ottawa County’s Outstanding Customer Service Award recipients for the first quarter of 2019. You can read the nominations which earned each recipient an award plus learn more about them at miOttawa.org.

kettring

Judy Kettering

“Judy truly cares about the well-being of the people she works with in the community and it shows in her efforts to assure she is providing the highest level of customer service. She is consistent, compassionate, responsive and reliable. Judy is a great representative of the Ottawa Way and demonstrates what customer service is all about.”  said Susan Keen, Nurse Supervisor.

 

 

archer

Frank Archer

“In Frank’s twenty-five plus years with the County Facilities team, he continually demonstrates to all his natural talent for customer service.  He always greets our customers with a friendly hello and a smile. He gives his full attention to their issue and quickly follows up with a solution and a can-do attitude. We are all proud of Frank’s work, the example he sets for others and being recognized for this achievement,” said John Borgerding, Building and Grounds Supervisor.

 

Implemented in 2012, the Customer Service initiative is one of the County’s Four C’s, along with Communication, Cultural Intelligence and Creativity. Customers can nominate an Ottawa County employee for an Outstanding Customer Service Award at miOttawa.org.

Access services and learn more about the County at miOttawa.org, on Facebook, on Twitter or on Instagram.

Ottawa County Population and Growth Rates

headerThe 2018 population estimates for townships, cities, and villages were released by the U.S. Census Bureau in May.  Some of the Ottawa County highlights are provided below:

• All of the townships, cities, and villages in Ottawa County continued to grow in population between 2010 and 2018
• Since 2010, the local units that experienced the largest population growth rates were Allendale (28.9% increase), Jamestown (22.5% increase), Blendon (16.1%), and Grand Haven Townships (15.6% increase)
• Grand Haven Township experienced the largest population growth rate between 2017 and 2018 (3.9% increase)

The County population estimates, which were released in April, showed Ottawa County as the fastest growing in the State and the 8th most populous.

The County Statistics page has been updated to reflect the latest population estimates.

Secretary Benson to Expand Appointment Option to Every Secretary of State Branch Office

Move is a significant step toward achieving 30-minute guarantee for all Michigan residents

MACKINAC ISLAND – May 30, 2019 — Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson today announced that the Michigan Department of State is expanding the option for Michigan residents to schedule appointments to every branch office across the state.

“No one in Michigan should wait more than 30 minutes to renew their license, register their vehicle or register to vote,” Benson said. “With our statewide expansion of appointments, every Michigan resident will have the option to make an appointment at their local branch office and get in and out of a branch office in less than 30 minutes.”

The Department of State currently offers appointments in 43 branches. The appointment option will be expanded to the remaining 88 branches in phases beginning in mid-June. Customers also will be able to make appointments to complete interstate commercial truck registrations at the International Registration Plan office in Dimondale.

“As I visited our 131 branch offices during my first 100 days in office, every resident I met who had the option to make an appointment ahead of time was able to get in and out of the branch office in less than 30 minutes. But our limited appointment options weren’t available to all residents,” Benson said. “This important change will ensure we are able to serve more residents effectively and efficiently throughout our state. It’s the first of several steps we intend to take in the months and years ahead as we modernize how the Department of State provides services for Michigan’s residents.”

As the expansion is phased in, Michigan residents can schedule appointments at their convenience by selecting the day, time and location they would like to visit at Michigan.gov/SOSAppointments.

Jim Edmonson Selected to Lead a New Era of Economic Development as Head of Muskegon Area First

jedmonsonMUSKEGON, MI – The Muskegon Area First Economic Development Corp. – the Muskegon County-wide non-profit economic development agency – is being transformed by community leaders from a government-led organization to one mainly funded and directed by the private sector.

A newly recreated, private-sector-led Muskegon Area First (MAF) board of directors has selected Jim Edmonson as its new president and chief executive officer to launch the new direction of the agency. Edmonson brings 43 years of economic development experience to the new position, including three years as MAF head in 2004-07.

The former Muskegon Area First board of directors hired Edmonson Associates of Baton Rouge, LA to help it in the transition. Edmonson took over the leadership of the agency June 3.

“Every era in a community’s history has different economic development needs,” said new MAF Board Chairman Mike Olthoff, CEO of Nichols – one of the largest independently owned paper, package and sanitary supply distributors in the Great Lakes region headquartered in Norton Shores.

“In 2019, Muskegon County needs to support its current employers with a skilled workforce as it continues to grow the county’s manufacturing base with local company expansions and attraction of new companies to fill needed niches in our economy. The MAF board feels that Jim Edmonson is perfectly suited to launch a new direction for Muskegon Area First and have the agency address the current economic development needs of Muskegon County.”

Edmonson will be spending his initial months with MAF establishing the private-sector led agency, which will still have financial and strategic relationships with local governments in Muskegon County. Early work with the revamped agency will be with ongoing development of revenues, a first-year budget and reorganization of staff.

“Honestly, I did not consult with MAF to become its next president and CEO,” Edmonson said. “But board members were very persuasive and this is an incredible time to be involved in Muskegon County economic development. Look around, Muskegon County is going through an historic community transformation. As a county resident, I am thrilled to be asked to be a part of it.”

Muskegon Area First has been in transition since former President and CEO Ed Garner left the agency for a regional small business development position in October 2017. Leading MAF through its transition has been interim President and CEO Darryl Todd, who will remain with the agency to work on business and talent development.

“We have been fortunate to have Darryl Todd provide steady leadership in countywide economic development these past 20 months and the board thanks him for his dedication to the community,” Olthoff said. “As MAF evolves, we are confident that Darryl’s skills will be used to meet the economic development needs the agency will be addressing.”

Hometown Health Hero Award

hhhaward

State Representative Brad Slagh, Public Health Nurse Leanna Kermeen, MDHHS Director Robert Gordon, State Senator Roger Victory

Leanna Kermeen, public health nurse, Ottawa County Department of Public Health, received a 2019 Hometown Health Hero Award presented by the Michigan Public Health Week Partnership. This award recognizes people across the state working tirelessly to maintain and improve the health of their local communities. Kermeen received the award for her dedication to the migrant farm worker program in Ottawa County. When Kermeen clocks out of work, she does not go home or run errands, instead she visits migrant communities to provide sexual health services and education to break down barriers to STD testing and treatment.

“Your impactful work to improve the health of migrant workers outside of your normal working hours is exemplary and we wish you continued success,” stated James Koval, Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, in the award letter.

During the last two years, Kermeen has worked with public health agencies, private farm owners and growers and a multi-county migrant resource council to identify and treat communicable diseases within the camps; primarily in men 25 years of age and younger. Her work to slow or stop the spread of infections, such as chlamydia, has positively impacted migrant farm workers and the community. She also connects with local food pantries to seek donated food, ensuring the workers have access to fresh fruits and vegetables, clothing, toothbrushes and other necessities.

“Public health is vital to the health of our county, state and nation. An act of public health positively impacts a person but it has a ripple effect to the larger population,” exclaimed Kermeen. “It’s been my privilege, honor and passion to work in public health. Receiving a Hometown Health Hero Award is humbling and it gives validation for the work being done. This work matters, and it’s thrilling to drive public health forward with such a supportive network.”

Underfunding of Michigan Mental Health System Shifts Financial Burden to Counties

County governments are being forced to loan millions to cover state shortfalls

A lack of adequate mental health funding from the state is putting an increased financial strain on already cash-strapped county governments, including Muskegon County.

HealthWest, a department of Muskegon County, is the local Community Mental Health Service Program (CMHSP) and is responsible for providing government-mandated services to those on Medicaid with a serious mental illness, developmental disability, serious emotional disturbance, and/or co-occurring substance use disorder.

About 84 percent of HealthWest’s $69 million annual budget comes from Medicaid payments distributed by the State of Michigan through local Prepaid Inpatient Health Plans (PIHPs).  Muskegon County’s general fund is responsible for roughly 1 percent of HealthWest’s annual budget. The remaining budget is funded through grants, substance use block grants and Public Act 2, the state general fund, reimbursements, and third-party funding sources.

However, delays in payments from the state and inadequate funding of the PIHPs have forced county governments across the state, including Muskegon County, to loan millions of dollars to their Community Mental Health Service Programs to cover expenses for programs the CMHSPs are required by law to provide.

Of the 10 PIHPs across the state, 9 are projecting a funding deficit for FY2019 and 4 PIHPs have no reserve funds to cover the anticipated shortfalls, including the Lakeshore Regional Entity. Lakeshore serves as the PIHP for Muskegon, Allegan, Kent, Lake, Mason, Oceana, and Ottawa counties.

These shortfalls have forced Muskegon County to loan more than $9 million from the county to cover payments owed to HealthWest, some of which date back as far as FY2017. Those funds have been used to pay for Medicaid-eligible services, which HealthWest is legally required to provide to any eligible Muskegon County resident.

“It is unfair that Muskegon County taxpayers are asked to foot the bill for services the State of Michigan is legally required to pay for,” said HealthWest Executive Director Julia Rupp. “We are working hard to ensure Muskegon County residents are receiving quality mental health services in the most cost-efficient manner possible, while also working with legislators to find real solutions to the state’s shortfall in mental health funding.”

HealthWest workers are carrying larger than ever caseloads and serving more people with less. In addition, administrative costs have been cut in response to the state’s funding issues, making it very challenging to respond to the rapidly changing mental health care scene. Since FY2015, HealthWest has become increasingly efficient in its service delivery, reducing delivery cost per person by more than 20 percent.

HealthWest has also joined the Section 298 Pilot, which will improve the coordination of publicly-funded physical and behavioral health services in Michigan and overhaul how they are funded. “The pilot gives us the chance to use savings resulting from improved care coordination to expand the services we provide to more people, and to better manage care for the whole person,” Rupp adds. Research shows that integrated care leads to overall community savings and better outcomes for the individuals served.

The cost of providing services continues to increase along with demand for services. Since FY2015, HealthWest has experienced a 41 percent increase in the number of people it serves annually. However, funding from the state has not kept pace as Medicaid payments have increased only 12 percent over the same period.

A study released earlier this year by the Community Mental Health Association of Michigan revealed a $150 million gap between the cost of health care and the funding provided to Michigan’s public mental health system.

Properly addressing the state’s mental healthcare needs not only helps those struggling with mental health issues, but it also saves county taxpayers money by reducing the strain on other more-costly services, such as the criminal justice and emergency medical systems.

“The state’s payment formulas have not kept up with the increasing demand for mental health services,” said Rupp. “This puts our local governments, taxpayers, and individuals receiving services at risk.”

For more information on Michigan’s mental health system underfunding, visit https://cmham.org/systemic-underfunding-of-michigans-public-mental-health-system/. To learn more about HealthWest, visit www.healthwest.net.

Pilot Project in Holland Aims to Help get People Outside Using Nature Prescriptions

ocparksPark Rx America is a new platform available to Holland-area doctors used to prescribe patients with time outdoors at a park that is accessible and convenient.

Ottawa County Parks, along with the City of Holland, Holland Charter Township, Park Township, Laketown Township, and the Outdoor Discovery Center are partnering with a non-profit organization, Park Rx America, and the Holland Hospital Physical Hospital Organization (PHO) to bring nature prescriptions to patients. Leading this pilot project is Dr. Beth Peter MD whose background is in family medicine.

streamGo get some fresh air is advice that’s been given for years. Intuitively, many people know that fresh air and sunshine can make you feel better, but in the past there hasn’t been much science to back that up. That is changing.

A number of recent evidentiary studies are uncovering the science behind the healing power of nature. Researchers are finding that time spent outdoors can have many positive, measurable outcomes such as: reduced stress, improved sleep, lower blood pressure, and increased social connectedness. (A full list of findings can be found here: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5744722/).

beachAt the same time humans are spending more time inside and in front of screens and other studies beg the question: Why is our culture so stressed?

“What those researchers are finding is that we were designed to be healthier, to exercise more and to eat more plants,” says Dr. Peter. “Our brains are developed for sunshine and fresh air.”

Park Rx America is a platform physicians can use to get their patients outdoors more often and create healthier habits. It contains a database of area parks that includes information to help doctors prescribe a park that will be the right fit for a patient. “Park Rx America will be helpful to patients and doctors because we don’t always know what’s out there,” said Dr. Peter. “It can also help answer important questions like ‘are there accessible pathways and bathrooms’? Or, ‘are dogs allowed?’”

Once doctors find the right park, they can create a prescription for their patient. Individuals will receive text reminders to visit their prescribed park and are able to check in when they arrive. They can also opt-in to answer questions about how they are feeling after their time outside. After the initial prescription is filled, the hope is that people keep coming back and perhaps begin to explore new places.

“The PHO is always searching for resources we can give our physicians to help them motivate their patients to make important habit changes so they are healthier, feel better, and are less stressed,” said Dr. Peter. “Park Rx America is one we’re really excited about.”

Dismembering Human Beings is Wrong

Since New York endorsed abortion-on-demand through all nine months of pregnancy, prolifers have been on the move. Many people who considered themselves prolife but didn’t commit themselves to regular efforts to end abortion have suddenly been awakened and activated.

Many of those people have seen prolife legislation in other states and wonder what Michigan will do. In Michigan, our focus will be a ban on dismemberment abortions (also called a D&E abortion).

Sadly, in Michigan, this prolife crescendo came at a bad time. Michigan went from having an indifferent governor in Rick Snyder to now having an actively pro-abortion governor in Gretchen Whitmer. The silver lining is Michigan voters returned prolife majorities to the Legislature.

Thankfully, Michigan’s Constitution has a provision that allows citizens to initiate legislation directly to the Legislature by collecting a large number of signatures. If the Michigan House and Senate approve the legislation, it becomes law without the governor.

Right to Life of Michigan and local affiliates have been very successful in the past using these petition drives, most recently in 2013. Such an effort requires a laser-like focus, and for the next two years our focus is on banning dismemberment abortion.

Several other states have advanced different prolife laws: bans on abortion after 20 weeks, heartbeat bans, bans on targeted abortions for reasons of sex-selection or disability, etc. Most of these laws require Roe v. Wade to be overturned to be effective.

Michigan is unique. Michigan currently has a law on the books banning abortion except to save the life of the mother. After Roe was decided in 1973, the Michigan Supreme Court ruled that our law remains in legal effect, but not fully enforceable. The day Roe v. Wade is overturned, our law has an opportunity to be restored to full effect. So, Michigan law already bans abortions after 20 weeks, or after a heartbeat is detected, or abortions targeted at specific demographics; we’ve got that covered.

A ban on dismemberment abortion is different. It’s the next prolife law likely to be upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court if they aren’t willing to fully overturn Roe v. Wade yet. Crucially, it allows us to educate people about abortion itself. A dismemberment abortion involves tearing the arms and legs off a child in the later stages of pregnancy.

Dismembering a human being goes against our Michigan values and it’s time for us to stop it.

Chris Gast
Director of Communication/Education

Community: Reward Offered in 2018 Assault

***REWARD***
Fruitport Police are seeking new tips in a random assault case that occurred in November of 2018. A reward of up to $10,000 is being offered through Muskegon County Silent Observer for any tip(s) that lead to an arrest and conviction in this incident.

On 11/01/2018, in the area of Jensen Rd and Cloverville Rd, a woman reported that she walked outside of her home to get the mail, when a small gold colored vehicle (possibly a Toyota Camry) pulled into her driveway. The driver of the vehicle got out, chased after her and physically assaulted her. The woman was able to get away from the subject, and flee back into her house.

The subject was described by the victim as a white male approximately 6’3” – 6’ 4” tall and weighing approximately 225 pounds. He was said to be wearing all black clothing with Brown colored work boots, a ski mask and gloves.

Anyone having information which would help lead polic e to the positive identity of the above described subject or vehicle, please contact the Fruitport Police department (231-865-8477), or Muskegon County Silent observer (72-CRIME or Online).